French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Graphic novels. Weekly rags. The @$$holes.

Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Pacino86845 on Tue Dec 02, 2008 11:32 am

Looks like the collective mind has been crying out for Jodorowsky...

Jodorowsky on his new film, King Shot

He describes it as being a metaphysical spaghetti western.
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Moebius & Jodorowski’s L’Incal

Postby TheButcher on Tue Dec 23, 2008 7:25 am

From Funnybook Babylon: Re-Coloring Moebius
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Re: Moebius & Jodorowski’s L’Incal

Postby Seppuku on Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:18 am

TheButcher wrote:From Funnybook Babylon: Re-Coloring Moebius


I just finished the original Incal a week or so ago, and I wasn't as blown away as I was with the prequel and the Metabarons. Whereas most of Jodo's other comics work had its own weekly rag or was released directly in TPB form, you can really tell that Incal was written to fill a few pages here, a few pages there in Heavy Metal. Also, the colouring was a little peculiar. Characters with skin tone more orange than celebrities in wintertime... Blood red seas... I'm not surprised it's getting recoloured. The new version looks a lot more like Janjetov's Incal prequel, whose art I greatly preferred; though it perhaps lacked the character of Moebius' lines, it more than made up for it with insanely intricate detail and some of the most beautiful and ugly characters in comics. I think Moebius' style lends itself better to a more Westerny kind of sci-fi, like the little story I scanned earlier, rather than the Incal macrocosm, where every inch has something going on.

The best thing about this new version (I hope) is that they'll finally get the translation right. The original Incals have been translated into English a few times, and each of those translations comes off a little wooden and the attempts at verbal humour a bit lame.

I still really enjoyed it, though. Jodo says in the intro: "I primarily set out to tell an adventure story, not deliver a message." In that it succeeds wholeheartedly- it hardly lets up for a second. Still, I'm glad I started out with some of his later comics work, because I might not have been inspired to delve much further if I'd started with l'Originale Incal.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Al Shut on Wed Dec 31, 2008 2:26 pm

I gave in and bought the first volume of Castaka, the Meabarons prequel (it was the cheapest of all the Jodorosky stuff)

:shock:

Strangly fascinating, certainly interesting and I although wouldn't call it actually good it was worth it.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Al Shut on Fri May 08, 2009 6:32 am

Recently rereading my criminal undersized and cheap Blueberry comics made me think of this thread. Turns out that despite dropping tghe name before I somehow forgot to mention how incredible great it is.

Chihuahua Pearl and Ballad for a Coffin are prime examples of comic books exellence with traces of the Good, the Bad and the Ugly thrown in, as it's basicly a big treasure hunt with treason and changing alliences every 15 pages.
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Re: Philippe Druillet

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:09 am

Who is Philippe Druillet ?
Is his work worth tracking down?

From Bleeding Cool: Do Anything 002 by Warren Ellis

Warren Ellis wrote:I’d have liked to see someone put the work of French writer/artist Philippe Druillet in front of Jack Kirby. I try to do it now, holding the pages in front of the robotic head of Jack Kirby, but it’s damp in Britain and there’s little viridian flecks of moss growing on his eyeballs. I think he would have seem himself in Druillet’s LONE SLOANE pages, if not necessarily in Druillet’s exegetic, excruciating LA NUIT.

In a 1979 interview, George Lucas explicitly cited Druillet — but not Kirby — as a visual influence on STAR WARS. Publicity images for the latter three films in that sequence (which I’ve never seen) look like photographic versions of character designs from Druillet’s SALAMMBO. But Darth Vader exudes the stench of Darkseid, and those huge spacegoing wedges could easily be Kirby’s. I like to think they would have found something to talk about. More than Kirby or Phil Dick would have found to talk about, even though — because? — they both clearly mythologised themselves a little bit in their later years. (Kirby, on the subject of his mother: “She was full of legends…she used to dramatise everything…”)

Druillet was already doing New Gods, five years before Kirby’s NEW GODS. And more, he was doing the postmodern, deconstructed version, Kirby with gravemoss grown over him and his towers and starships, designing STAR WARS ten years before Lucas had beaten out the first awful draft of the film (the one whose treatment begins “The is the story of Mace Windu, a revered Jedi-bendu of Ophuchi who was related to Usby C. J. Thape, a padawaan leader to the famed Jedi.”). Druillet’s work is the mystery ancestor to the mad French architect Francois Roche, who has designed buildings specifically intended to necrotise and rot. I met him recently – we were interviewed together for ICON magazine, an architecture journal – and stood stunned and fascinated as he described his “strategies of sickness” for this building he was projecting on a big screen, his “Thing That Necroses.” On completion of a building, Roche hires a writer to produce a piece of (science) fiction about it, in order to control the story and render it impermeable to critics. As if to say, the criticism is not the story, this is the story.

LONE SLOANE features a mysterious character called Kurt Kurtsteiner. Kurt Wargar and Kurt Steiner were two pseudonyms of the French science fiction writer Andre Ruellan. Ruellan once wrote a novel called LE 32 JUILLET (JULY 32nd) in which the protagonist finds himself within an extradimensional city that is in fact the innards of a vast animal, a suppurating organic city that is trying to digest him.

The head of Jack Kirby gnaws on the end of the Dominican cigar I’ve given him because I’m sick of wasting my expensive Romeo Y Julietas on the complaining bastard and tells me that he knows about architecture too. He designed vast architectural conceits for a theme park to be based on sf writer Roger Zelazny’s novel LORD OF LIGHT via an intended film adaptation by one Barry Geller. Kirby said the project would be “very valuable to humanity.” Neither film nor park were ever made. But Kirby’s design sheets were lifted by the CIA and used as part of an elaborate stunt to free six American citizens during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis.

The head of Jack Kirby smirks. “I am a concept man,” he says to me (he said it to Barry Geller). “I can get to the nut of a story.” He knows everything connects through him. He sees the nut of the story.

Somewhere, Francois Roche is thinking about designing a theme park inside a vast artificial stomach that very slowly digests the buildings and the people. There will be Science, and Fiction. He is happy.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:15 am

I read that today and was like, WHOA? Who is THAT dude?

I am loving this Warren Ellis column.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:16 am

Me too. :D
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:20 am

Much more so than his comics work lately, as a matter of fact.

Thus far, Bleeding Cool has become an interesting site in the comics landscape.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Al Shut on Fri Dec 25, 2009 2:21 pm

Oh my what a headfuck. :?

I read The Airtight Garage by Moebius, one of those stories he improvised as he went along completing 2-3 pages at a time. Right now my reaction is bafflement similar to having watched a David Lynch for the first time, before you can start making sense of it. I have no clue what was going on but the talent at display keeps me from getting totally frustrated.

Another comparison would be if Clive Barker spoke techno-babble and had no clue what he's doing, Imajica or the Books of Art might look like this (although the Airtight Garage has a good deal less sex)
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Pacino86845 on Fri Dec 25, 2009 4:58 pm

Hehe I've got that lying around somewhere, Moebius is GENIUS even if I rarely know what the fuck is going on... one sort of hard to find book of his that I've been keen on reading is "The World of Edena" (my translation)... I have the second issue of the original printing, but then he changed publisher for the last couple of books in the series, it's all confusing now especially since the books aren't even in the same format.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:35 pm

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Universal War One

Postby TheButcher on Fri Mar 26, 2010 9:08 pm

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby John-Locke on Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:32 pm

:shock:

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Seppuku on Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:57 pm

Sweet mother of mercy, awesome find! They both have a real hypnotic Rene Laloux vibe going down. Now I'm incredibly angry that neither of them got made. Jodorowsky and Moebius spend millions on the pre-production of a Dune movie that didn't happen, and yet they couldn't find the funding for this? Sucks isn't the word.

Ah well, I just suddenly got a yen for French animation and found this beautiful Rene Laloux short movie on Youtube that I didn't know existed. I think Moebius did a few storyboards for it, like he did for most of Laloux's stuff. It's no Incal or Arzach feature, but it'll do. I actually think The Metabarons or the Technopriests would make a pretty good basis for a weird European sci-fi film, but studios seem to be more into remaking than adapting these days. Although in this case they're probably a bit too offbeat for mass consumption. And we basically already got an Incal flick with The Fifth Element.

Anyhoo:



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Re: Kurosawa, Moebius and The Airtight Garage

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 26, 2010 9:49 pm

From Wired:
Mark Frauenfelder wrote:
Moebius

Jean Giraud's stunning cartoons scan like movies.

"The Long Tomorrow" could have been the prototype for Blade Runner. His designs have appeared in Tron, Alien, and The Abyss.

But attempts to turn his stories into movies have always fallen through. Until now.

"The Airtight Garage" is headed for the big screen, produced by legendary Japanese filmmaker Kurosawa and animated by the people who brought you Akira.

By Mark Frauenfelder

Will next year be remembered as the year that French comic book artist Moebius finally conquered America? Will kids get to cruise in spaceships across his frozen, ochre planet-scapes, courtesy of their neighborhood location-based-entertainment theme park? Will moviegoers have the opportunity to groove on the cool computer effects of his animated The Airtight Garage? Will they recognize Moebius as the same artist who gave them the space suits in Alien, the characters in The Abyss, and the designs in Tron?

Maybe. Jean Giraud - aka Moebius - is widely recognized in Europe as the gifted creator of surrealistic western, science fiction, and fantasy comics, but he's practically unknown in the US, except among the discrete group of adults who read comic books. Giraud has tried several times to make a movie, but he hasn't been able to break his run of bad luck.

If creative genius were all it took to make a movie, Giraud would have made one long ago. He is regarded by many critics as the artist who changed the look of science fiction, not only in comic books but in films as well. "Moebius was a major precursor in gritty, ground-level science fiction. Before Moebius, science fiction was glistening starships," says Kim Thompson, co-publisher of Fantagraphics, the Seattle comic book company responsible for the brilliant Love & Rockets, Eightball, and Hate. "Graphically, his work was a revolution. Moebius is one of the few European cartoonists who's big in the US, because he funneled a lot of American influences into his comics."

"The Long Tomorrow," a story written by Dan O'Bannon and drawn by Giraud that appeared in the French magazine Metal Hurlant in 1977, has a dystopic urban feel that can be described in two words: Blade Runner. No wonder Giraud has helped to flesh out the visions of movie directors Ridley Scott and Jim Cameron.

Moebius's first opportunity to make his own picture came when he teamed up with Chilean filmmaker Alexandro Jodorowski to create an adaptation of Dune (not related to the DeLaurentis/David Lynch disaster of the same name). The money for Dune ran out somewhere between the time Giraud finished designing the sets and characters and the time cameras were supposed to roll. His next project, Starwatcher, was slated to be the first feature- length animated movie to be made with 3-D computer graphics. But the film's producer died in a car accident, and shortly thereafter it was discovered that the French production company bankrolling the film was FF85 million (US$15 million) in debt. (Many suspected the car accident was no accident.)

Then, in 1990, Soyuzmultfilm, a Russian animation studio, announced that it was bringing one of Giraud's most famous comic book stories, "The Airtight Garage," to the screen. But when the Soviet Union dissolved, so did the movie deal. It seemed that Giraud just couldn't crack the movie nut. Now, independent movie maker Philippe Rivier wants to change that.

In the '60s, in a provincial town in the south of France, young Rivier would queue up behind the rest of the villagers making their weekly pilgrimage to Nimes's magazine store. They were all waiting to buy the latest copy of Pilote, in which the new chapter of Jean Giraud's Lieutenant Blueberry awaited them. Giraud's weekly comic strip, scripted by Michel Charlier, told the story of a US Cavalry lieutenant in the Wild West. Completely unlike the American comic books of the day, it aimed to imitate motion pictures, because, as Giraud explains, "for my generation, pictures, especially American pictures, were synonymous with culture, total art, philosophy."

Lieutenant Blueberry remains his most popular work, based on unit sales of books, but after a decade of drawing in a conventional genre and style, Giraud felt that his personal expression was being cramped: "I was looking for something that would allow me to maintain contact with another universe." That something was a radical departure from drawing cowboys and Indians on the Great Plains. "All of a sudden, in the late '60s and early '70s, I discovered the American underground, Robert Crumb, and all that jazz, and I felt 'the times, they were a-changing,' and consequently, I found my own personal way of expression through Moebius."

In 1975, Giraud and a couple of other experimental French cartoonists started a magazine called Metal Hurlant (republished in the US as Heavy Metal). It was in Metal Hurlant that French readers - and movie directors around the world - discovered not only a fine storyteller and cartoonist, but an artistic genius. By the '80s, Giraud was creating sets and costumes for motion pictures, and in 1985 he was awarded the highest French award for cultural and artistic achievement by President Francois Mitterand.

Now, twenty-five years after the cool summer mornings spent reading Blueberry on the sidewalk in front of the newsstand, Philippe Rivier is seeing one of his dreams come true. Rivier has picked up the pieces that the Russians dropped and has signed on to produce The Airtight Garage as an animated feature. "It's a treat to be working with somebody with such an incredible imagination, because it makes you realize that all the little parts of life that you think are so important don't matter that much," says Rivier. He says that he has secured the US$20 million production budget, and that a famous rock group (rumored to be U2) will provide the soundtrack.

This might be the start of another sad "Moebius can't make a movie" story if it weren't for Kurosawa Enterprises USA, which has hooked up with Rivier and Starwatcher Graphics (Giraud's US corporation) to produce The Airtight Garage. Kurosawa is working on securing a worldwide distribution deal, and is supporting the animation production in Japan.

Japanese film master Akira Kurosawa and French comic master Moebius make a complementary team. Giraud started out making Western comics and then moved into science fiction. Kurosawa directed Seven Samurai and Yojimbo, which became the basis for two world-famous westerns: The Magnificent Seven and A Fistful of Dollars. His film The Hidden Fortress foreshadowed the plot of Star Wars.

Rivier says that one reason he was so excited to have animation buff Kurosawa involved with the movie project was that the director has access to Japanese animators. The Starwatcher movie never got past a six-minute demo because nobody involved in the project realized how expensive it was to make a full-length movie using only high quality 3-D computer graphics. This time around The Airtight Garage will use a combination of traditional cel animation and computer animation. The cel animation will be done in Japan under the direction of Katsuhiro Otomo, whose animated feature Akira was a huge hit in Japan and a cult classic in the United States. Like Giraud in his cinematic approach to comics, "Otomo uses traditional cinematography techniques for animation," says Rivier. "His angles and camera movement look like real life movies." The computer animation will be done in the United States. Though Rivier says he's been talking with Jim Cameron at Digital Domain, they haven't chosen a studio yet.

The move from making comic books based on western movies to making science fiction movies based on comic books is just one of many odd, circular trips Giraud has taken. His definition of the Wild West sounds like a description of cyberspace: "It's about the contact with nature, not completely primeval but not yet under the control of man; it's about technology that is already impressive but retains its human dimension; it's about the forces of government trying to exercise pressure but failing."

Giraud is optimistic that finally his movie will be made. If all goes well The Airtight Garage will be in full production by the time you read this, and released by Christmas of 1995. "This is like a dream about to come true, because I have been wanting to make this film for quite a few years now. But the truth is, it would have been difficult to do it the way I envisioned, because the computer technology was not available yet. I am now hopeful that we'll be able to create the kind of striking and powerful images and effects that I hope to employ in faithfully conveying the universe of The Airtight Garage."

If Giraud's movie hopes come to fruition, an interactive version of The Airtight Garage universe might appear on our planet as well. Avatar Partners, the virtual reality development company from Boulder Creek, California, that makes the financial product vrTrader, is planning to develop a family of virtual reality games based on the film. Their ambitious project includes home games (for Sega, 3DO, IBM, and the upcoming Nintendo/SGI gamebox), tele-games in which people play in a graphical MUD, and a location-based environment. Peter Rothman, president of Avatar, plans to develop the games parallel to the movie's production and to incorporate computer animation developed for the movie into the games.

Giraud is familiar with the computer as an artistic tool. His first experience with digital art was his work on Tron. "Later I began experimenting with my son's Amiga system, and eventually I learned how to do real artwork using paint box programs."

Giraud views the computer art process as a "form of pure graphic expression. I personally am fascinated by its seemingly direct link with the unconscious mind. I've noticed that, after a while, you start using the computerized tools like a sleepwalker. You travel half-consciously through its infinite and incredibly flexible range of forms and colors for hours and hours, without an actual pen, brush, or a tube of paint. You can enter an unbelievably complex domain, where you can break a picture, take it apart, change it, put it back together, start it all over. Computers make artistic expression and the expression of the unconscious mind one and the same thing. A true artist doesn't become warped or lost because of this infinity of possibilities, because he learns to recognize, to feel the moment when his true oeuvre has emerged and is there."

As much as he enjoys using computers, Giraud is not about to throw away his brushes and Bristol board. "There are still some forms of pleasure derived from putting a pen to paper that you can't yet get from working on a computer."

Giraud will surely derive some pleasure from making the film version of The Airtight Garage; but it has also become a matter of spiritual survival. Of his prior experience with the film industry, Giraud says, "I discovered that people who make movies regard filmmaking almost as a matter of life and death. They feel they're going to die if they don't make their films. I am starting to understand that."

Too bad this never happened.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Pacino86845 on Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:10 pm

This thread just got very real, awesome posts guys, especially JL raising the quality to 11.
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Re: Kurosawa, Moebius and The Airtight Garage

Postby Al Shut on Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:35 pm

TheButcher wrote:Too bad this never happened.


I dunno. Somehow I got the feeling a movie version of The Airtight Garage would be even harder to digest than the comic.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jul 24, 2010 2:24 pm

CBR @ CCI: "Cyclops" Comes to America
Kevin Mahadeo wrote:War, what is it good for? For comic book readers, the answers is high-octane action, commentary on the human condition and reality television taken to the extreme as seen in the upcoming miniseries "Cyclops" by writer Matz and artist Luc Jacamon.

Originally published as a French graphic novel in 2006 by Casterman, "Cyclops" finally makes its way to American audiences by way of Archaia, who previously brought over the duo's first collaboration together "The Killer." The publishing company announced the news Friday at its All Access panel at Comic-Con International in San Diego and plans to release the first issue of the miniseries in Spring 2011. Taking place approximately fifty years in the future, the story follows Douglas Pistoia as he finds himself drafted into a war where soldiers wear cameras that broadcast their actions all across the globe. As Pistoia continues to rise higher and higher in rank, he begins making decisions and following orders that soon bring into question his own humanity. The graphic novel delves into ideas behind the privatization of war and the evolution of the entertainment industry as reality TV continues to progress into stranger and more unusual territory - but the title mainly tells a very human story about how much it costs to lose one's self.
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Re: An Evening with Moebius Nov 20, 2010

Postby TheButcher on Tue Sep 21, 2010 2:50 am

Comic Legend Jean Giraud "Moebius" Comes to US Expo for the First Time in 20 Years

The Creative Talent Network (CTN), one of the entertainment industry’s most exclusive communities for top talent artists in the film and animation industries presents in a US exclusive appearance the multi-faceted legendary author and comic strip artist Jean Giraud "Moebius" in “An Evening with Moebius” held on November 20 in Burbank CA.

Internationally recognized, Jean Giraud's work has profoundly influenced the worlds of science fiction, animation, publicity, 3D imagery and video games for over thirty years. His drawings have also attracted the attention of great filmmakers including Luc Besson’s 5th Element, James Cameron’s Abyss, Steven Lisberger’s Tron and Ridley Scott’s Alie among many others.

Like the Moebius strip, whose two ends fold together to form a one-sided loop, the artist sees his identity as dual. Known as both Gir and Moebius these dual pseudonyms reflect his own shifting artistic identity resulting in a variety of fully realized styles, from the detailed realism of Blueberry, to the dreamlike drawings of Arzach.

Having not been in the United States for over 15 years "An Evening with Moebius" is a rare exclusive opportunity to see and hear from this internationally recognized artist. Now less than 70 days away this once in a lifetime opportunity with limited seating is designed to promote a "special event" atmosphere that includes moderated interview, presentation, drawing demonstration along with surprise special guests. All attendees are invited to the after hours cocktail party directly following the event. Only one US appearance. Tickets $75.00.

An Evening With Moebius
Special event and cocktail reception
Saturday Nov 20th, 2010 - 8pm
Reservations available at: http://www.regonline.com/ctnx2010

Burbank Convention Center
2500 Hollywood Way
Burbank, CA
1-800-604-2238 (USA Toll Free)
1-818-667-3224 (USA Local)
http://www.ctnanimationexpo.com
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Re: Re: An Evening with Moebius Nov 20, 2010

Postby TheButcher on Sat Nov 13, 2010 12:12 am

From Hero Complex:
Moebius to make rare U.S. visit for Burbank animation expo
Moebius is coming. There are few living illustrators whose name possesses a true mystique, and near the top of that list is Jean Giraud, a.k.a. Moebius, the 78-year-old artist whose work has rippled throughout pop culture and influenced several generations of filmmakers and comic-book artists – as well as fashion designers, musicians, video-game creators and pop artists of every stripe. He also worked for Hollywood with memorable concept or design contributions to “Alien,” “Tron,” “The Abyss“ and “The Fifth Element.” The French creator hasn’t been stateside in more than a decade and a half, but on Nov. 20 he is a featured speaker at the CTN Animation Expo, a three-day event at the Burbank Convention Center. We caught up with a key expo organizer, Tina Price, via e-mail to talk about the international visitor and the event as it goes into its second year.
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Re: Möebius: Transe-Forme

Postby TheButcher on Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:58 pm

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Pacino86845 on Tue Feb 01, 2011 10:53 pm

Holy moly that is a thing of beauty... some amazing pieces there, and yeah: "immense" is definitely the word for that exhibit!
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Re: Möebius: Transe-Forme

Postby TheButcher on Wed Feb 02, 2011 6:54 am

From Design Boom:
moebius: transe-forme at the fondation cartier, paris
the fondation cartier pour l'art contemporain presents an exhibition devoted to the work of
french comics artist jean giraud, more commonly known by his pseudonyms moebius and gir.
'moebius-transe-forme' is the first major show in paris dedicated to giraud's contribution to
the graphic medium, chronicling his earlier work to his more progressive delineation that often goes
beyond the traditional boundaries of the discipline. presented in an impressive collection of
original notebook sketches, comic book panels, paintings, unpublished drawings as well as
an animated film, the exhibition explores the theme of metamorphosis, an overriding motif present
in the artist's body of work.


http://www.moebius-transe-forme.com/

http://www.moebius.fr/Site-officiel-de- ... al-website
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Pacino86845 on Wed Feb 02, 2011 11:25 am

The Flash animation on the fondation's website is a wicked little preview at what Moebius's art could look like animated. MAKE IT SO!
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Re:Moebius

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:55 pm

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Re: Moebius

Postby TheButcher on Sun Apr 03, 2011 11:06 pm


For his fans, the man called Moebius could never live up to the mystery conjured up by that name. Like Houdini or Hendrix, Fellini or Frazetta, the 72-year-old French artist’s name has become supercharged by the unreal, which has made it disconcerting to see him sipping from a beige coffee cup in a hotel room near the Burbank Airport while a maid attempted to lug her vacuum cleaner through the doorway. “We need a moment,” the artist said with a Parisian bow of the chin and an apologetic smile. “It’s time to talk about art.”

The name on his passport is Jean Giraud and he was born in May 1938 (just one month before Superman arrived in a small rocket from another planet in the pages of “Action Comics” No. 1) and he has long been regarded as the most important cartoonist of his country. That phrase, however, falls wildly short of capturing the essence of his career and breadth of his influence through comics, book covers, paintings and movie work. As filmmaker Ridley Scott said last year of the Moebius influence on contemporary sci-fi film: “You see it everywhere, it runs through so much you can’t get away from it.” Perhaps, but the artist is still caught off guard by the breathless reception he gets these days. In late November, Giraud made a relatively rare visit to the U.S. to speak at the Creative Talent Network Animation Expo and again and again he was approached by fans and younger professionals who gushed.

“They said that I changed their life,” Giraud whispered in amazement. “‘You changed my life.’ ‘Your work is why I became an artist.’ Oh, it makes me happy. But you know at same time I have an internal broom to clean it all up. It can be dangerous to believe it. Someone wrote, ‘Moebius is a legendary artist.’ I put a frame around me. A legend — now I am like a unicorn.”

The affable artist has been enjoying a surge of affection in his home country, too, with the large and lavish exhibit at Fondation Cartier Pour L’Art Contemporain recently staged in Paris. The collection features enormous pieces — entire walls have been given over to the artist’s oddly serene images, which veer from Old West frontiers that Sergio Leone would find welcoming as well as fantastic beasties that seem to roam the dream-time landscapes bordered by the imaginations of Winsor McCay and Rene Magritte. Also Moebius has just returned to his most famous fantasy character, Arzak, the traditionally tight-lipped traveler who, after 36 years of gliding in silence, speaks for the first time in the hardcover comic book ”Arzak: L’Arpenteur” (which has yet to be translated for the English-reading audience).

The recognition is plainly pleasing to Giraud but bittersweet realities tug at the corners of his smile. He is dealing with profound vision problems and finds that the time devoted to his true love, writing and drawing comics, is diminishing as he uses his hours to paint the large commission pieces that sell for tens of thousands of dollars. And though he has enjoyed some memorable success in Hollywood (he was responsible for design elements in “Tron,” “The Fifth Element“ and Scott’s “Alien“) he looks back on his work with film as a sour reminder of what could have been if timing, geography and luck had worked in his favor. He relates all of this things with a wink and a shrug.

“After all the years I have a problem with my eyes. In my left eye I have the cataract. They took my eye out, they took it to a shop. They did the sort of sushi chef stuff to it” — here he does a chopping-board pantomime — “and they put it back and now it is special. It is like the Terminator and his android eye. The vision in my left eye is different in the right eye and it is very difficult to have the skill I had. The computer is very good for me, I can magnify my work very easily. With the painting, it is very expensive there are a lot of people who want to have my stuff. The level of price increases every year. It is a better, for me, way of life. But with my eye it is not that easy.”

Giraud was born in the Paris suburb of Nogent-sur-Marne and by 18, with little formal training, his cowboy adventure tales were being published in the pages of Far West magazine. In his early 20s, he became the apprentice of the Belgian artist Jijé, best known for his work on “Spirou et Fantasio” and the western adventure comics series “Jerry Spring.” Giraud worked on one of the ”Jerry Spring” books and the experience clearly informed his first signature creation, Blueberry, the Old West wanderer who first appeared on Halloween 1963. The stories of Michael “Blueberry” Donovan — a Southerner framed for murder who rides the range and fights against bigotry despite (or because of) his heritage –were written by Jean-Michel Charlier until his death in 1990 when his longtime collaborator took on both the writing and art chores.

“I started in 1957 when I sold my first story to a magazine,” he said. “It’s impossible to count how many stories I did, how many pages. But there have not been very many characters. I have just six, you know, and a lot of it started with Blueberry.”

The western still holds a special place in the heart of Giraud — he could barely, for instance, contain his excitement about the release of the Coen brothers film “True Grit” — and in his native country the long, lonesome ride of Lt. Blueberry is regarded by many as the defining work. But while the realistic frontier tales gave him a compelling storytelling outlet, his imagination was restless to explore strange new vistas. That led to the 1960s adoption of the pen-name Moebius (as well as a third identity, Gir).

“In the beginning I had two different levels,” Giraud said. “To be an artist in comics because it was my dream as a teenager and when I was 7, 8, 10. I was such a fan. I committed already to drawing. The comics were not only stories to enjoy for me they were drawings that possessed me. I saw very early on the difference with my friends. They were using comics like a book but to me I saw a drawing exposition. The purpose was different for us, the experience was not the same. The second level for me, another side – which would maybe be my Moebius face – was the other wonderful art I was discovering with a lot of appetite. The expression of art as something bigger than life, bigger than anything. There was something very mysterious about that and beautiful. It was a kind of heaven with Picasso and everybody at the same table. I wanted to be part of that. For me it was a feast through the ages. Timeless.”

At that point, though, there were frustrations with the divides between the hard-bordered world of comics and the judgmental canvas of the art world.

“There was a new generation of comic book artists in America and Europe [coming up in the 1960s and 1970s] and we wanted to connect the ambitions of art and comics,” Giraud said. “[To combine] the dream of being artists and the culture and traditions of doing comics. We wanted to put art in comics and comics into art and then send it to the audience. Into the dream, that was the dream of painting and drawing and doing everything. But especially the painting. I started trying to be a traditional painter with brush. I never started with oil. I’m not really completely traditional but with the brush I wanted to do something almost the same, to imitate oil with the brush and after that with acrylic and after that with watercolor. Always it was about color. The color for me is so very important. It is part of my open dream in art, not only in comics. In the 1970s, I made a bridge between the two things.”

The 1970s brought Giraud a strange new character, an odd fellow with a strange, tall hat and a great winged beast. ”I did the first Arzak in 1977. It was very strange. We were creating the magazine Heavy Metal – in France it was Screaming Metal, Metal Hurlant – and we wanted to change everything. We wanted to be completely original and bizarre. That story was in the first issue and the next four after that. I didn’t myself know what I was doing. I just wanted it to be different. It was mute. It had no story, almost, and it was strange in the situations and the background. When it was finished it came out as a book … and it was like the stone in ’2001: a Space Odyssey,’ the monolith, and it gave me a specific energy through all those years…the first one had no story so everything was possible with it I did a lot of posters, pictures, drawings, all of this guy with this guy with the strange hat and that bird.”

Two years ago, Moebius was eager to return to the storyteller mode with a new comic book epic. He put pencil to paper in search of a new face but the sketch lines on the page took him back to an old friend. ”I was looking for a new character. But I didn’t want to do a new character, not really, or I was not sure. So it came back to Arzak. The question then was it possible to redo Arzak as the mute and I said no. The time is now to give life and to incarnate him. Before it, the first stories, it was like watching from a distance with difficulty, there’s much that was not known. To find his voice I had to build the world around him, the context, where, why, how — all of those questions and the answers give to Arzak his position.”

He said there may be more to come. “In the first book with Arzak I tried to do a story where possibilities were open and the doors were not closed too much. It was a moment, not a story. The world and the stories are built around what has come before. I want to create a house not a box. I cannot tell you where he’s going, but I can tell you it will be great. My pleasure is to do the stories. I am a storyteller. I must manage between the pleasure and the work. It is also a pleasure for me to do the paintings but is different. I try to make time for both.” Then his head tilted in consternation and he turned to an interpreter who helped him find the phrase he wanted. “A balance,” he said with an expression of exaggerated defeat.

With an eye to the 1960s and America, when Marvel comic books were crackling with the creations of Jack Kirby, Giraud said he was most intrigued by the work of R. Crumb and the underground movement that was taking the storytelling traditions of comics and using them for startling expressions of self and wonderfully subversive commentary on the world beyond the page. With a confessional whisper he added that he was not a man of the times when it came to mind expansion. “I did mushrooms in 1964, I did them only once. It was very violent on my stomach. It was not comfortable. There was psychic adventure for others but for me there was no comfort.”

Giraud met Kirby once near the end of the artist’s life and “it was a very warm meeting, I was a very big fan, of course,” and the French admirer famously took on one of the American icon’s creations for the 1988-89 Marvel miniseries “The Silver Surfer: Parable.” It was a landmark moment for Marvel Comics and even popped up as a random topic in the submarine-crew dialogue of the film ”Crimson Tide,” much to the delight of Giraud. “I was glued to my seat in the theater, I can tell you,” he said with a vigorous laugh.

Filmmaking and Hollywood have been elusive for Giraud and he can tick off the failures and fizzled adaptations. Even the successes were limited.

“‘Tron’ was not a big hit,” he said of the 1982 film that recently yielded a sequel that again used his design work as a starting point for some of its digital creations. “The movie went out in theaters in the same week as ‘E.T.’ and, oh, that was a disaster for it. There was also ‘Blade Runner’ and ['Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan'] that summer so it was a battle of giants. ‘Tron’ was a piece of energy trying to survive. It is still alive. It survives. And the new movie is what Steven wanted to do back then but at that time CG was very odd and we were pioneers. I almost did the first computer-animated feature after that, it was called ‘Star Watcher,’ we had the story, we had the preparation done, we were ready to start. But it came apart; the company did not give us the approval. It was too far, the concept to do everything in computer animation. We were waiting, waiting, and then our producer died in a car accident. Everything collapsed. That was my third contribution to animation and my worst experience.”

In 1982, Giraud and director René Laloux released the feature-length animated movie “Les Maîtres du Temps” (released in English as “Time Masters“) based on a Stefan Wul novel. The artist winces at the mere mention of the project. “It’s a strange story, it’s a small movie, and cheap — incredibly cheap –it was more than independent. When I saw the film for the first time I was ashamed. It’s not a Disney movie, definitely. But because the movie has, maybe a flavor, a charm, it is still alive after all that time. More than 35 years now and it is still here.”

The artist says he finds it hard to retrace his steps and he nodded toward his wife and business partner, Isabelle Giraud, leaning over a laptop computer nearby.

“She says I exist because I always do something new, but many people they exist because they do something that is always the same,” Giraud said. “It is a kind of a performance to always stay; the audience sees them and admires it because they remind them of the past and they seem to always stay young, stay strong, stay active. The purpose of transformation is not for everyone.” A musical analogy was offered; Bob Dylan continues to push and experiment and revamp his music and persona instead of trying to stay forever young, while the Rolling Stones tour with all the familiar hits as a tenacious declaration that, no matter what the calendar says, time is on their side. “Yes, that it is. The Rolling Stones keep their audience and new ones come in and understand it. Their career is a piece of art. Dylan has pieces all over and it’s a diffused audience and there are chapters to him.”

The man they call Moebius trailed a finger along the brow above his healthier eye. “I have no explanation but I am interested in being alive. No, seriously, staying alive for an artist means to always be in an unknown part of himself. To be out of himself. The exhibition in Paris, the theme was transformation. Art is the big door but real life is a lot of small doors that you must pass through to create something new. You don’t always need to go far. If you are in the space station Mir and you need to fix something, you go outside, but not too far. If you travel too far you’ll die. Outer space is not human but you can visit. You need to be a little bit out there but you need to stay close to human.”

– Geoff Boucher
Last edited by TheButcher on Wed Jun 29, 2011 12:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Tue May 17, 2011 4:22 am

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Re: Moebius

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 29, 2011 12:09 am

From ComicsAlliance:
Moebius Visions of American Superheroes and Comic Book Icons [Art]
Andy Khouri wrote:Moebius -- aka Jean Giraud -- is an illustrator whose work we've discussed at relatively great length here at ComicsAlliance. Described by our own David Brothers as "your favorite artist's favorite artist," Moebius is best known around the world for his beautiful works like The Incal, The Airtight Garage, Arzach, Blueberry and, of course, Silver Surfer: Parable, which he collaborated on with Stan Lee. The beloved 1998 story is one of just a handful of projects Moebius has created within mainstream American comics. While few in number and mainly taking the form of covers or pin-ups, each image of American superheroes and comic book icons the master sends into our orbit is memorably beautiful.



Humanoids is preparing to release this week a new hardcover collection of The Incal, one of Moebius' most sought after and long out-of-print European works (created with Alejandro Jodorowsky). Hopefully it will be the first of many such reprints of Moebius' largely out-of-print English editions. We'll have more on The Incal later, but for now we thought it was a good time to assemble some of the artist's unique interpretations of some very familiar icons to prepare you for that gorgeous book and also just because these are awesome.
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Re: Moebius

Postby TheButcher on Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:27 pm

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Seppuku on Tue Dec 06, 2011 6:26 am

Been on a bit of a Euro-comics kick the last few weeks, so I'm just droppin' by to rattle off a few of my favourites.

Pretty much everything by Jason. Favourites: I Killed Adolf Hitler, The Last Musketeer, The Left Bank Gang and Hey, Wait

Requiem Vampire Hunter by Pat Mills (originally put out in France). Really fucking vivid depiction of hell in which the worse you acted in life, the better a lot you get when you reincarnate in the afterlife: ranging from the Vampire nobility to the zombie and ghouls and, I think, leprechauns way down at the bottom of the [literal] food chain. Pat Mills is the king of super-masculine comics with some iota of depth. Defoe's also pretty brilliant.

Green Manor by Fabien Vehlmann. Asterix style art with smart little murder stories, usually involving the bored noblesse indulging in the ultimate taboo of murdah!

Orbital by Sylvain Runberg. It seems that the French are the best at creating really elaborate sci-fi worlds in comic form. Also check out Aldebaran/Betelgeuse and especially the Valerian comics.

Laika by Nick Abadzis. One of the things European comics seem especially good at is not overloading the panels with too much dialogue and description; acting like a great silent movie. If you've ever "read" The Arrival by Shaun Tan (and if you haven't, you really should- best comic ever!), this should be up your alley.

Blacksad. Fun Spanish film noir-style comic book with anthropomorphic characters. Was cool seeing Joseph McCarthy rendered as a cockerel and Allen Ginsberg as a bison. Sounds about right to me.

The Hollow Grounds by Luc Schuiten. I wanted weird transportive illogical sci-fi and this is what I got.

Adele Blanc-Sec. Recently made into a Luc Besson film. Bit Tintinny. Also check out the Blake & Mortimer series.

Keepers of the Maser. Italian fantasy about dwarfs and shit. Really pretty art...kinda ropey plot and dialogue, but pretty fun. Very Heavy Metal.
Dale Tremont Presents...

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Al Shut on Tue Dec 06, 2011 7:09 am

Seppuku wrote: Also check out the Blake & Mortimer series.


I kinda dug the volumes where Tibet blitzkriegs the entire world
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Re: Möebius

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:53 am

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Al Shut on Thu Jan 19, 2012 5:46 am

The images with the scull forehead resurrect some unwanted memories.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Sat Mar 10, 2012 3:48 pm

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Sat Mar 10, 2012 4:02 pm

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby DennisMM on Sat Mar 10, 2012 4:47 pm

*sigh* Thanks, Monsieur Giraud.
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MŒBIUS

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:06 am

Unblocking Moebius
Rich Johnston wrote:
We respectfully ask the estate of Jean Giraud, aka MŒBIUS, to authorize the publication of English-language editions of his comics by HUMANOIDS PUBLISHING, FANTAGRAPHICS BOOKS, or any other suitable English-language publisher that shows interest.

Craig Fischer writes on behalf of the Moebius USA Petition Facebook page.
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Re: Universal War One

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 22, 2014 1:59 am

Universal War Comes To Titan?
Rich Johnston wrote:Denis Bajram’s Universal War One was one of the most outstanding graphic novels that got reprinted in English by Marvel during their four year long joint-venture with French publisher Soleil (2008-2011). Originally released in the sumptuous oversized European format, Marvel adapted the material into US-sized format: 6 comic-books and 2 hardcover collections.

Recently, Variety reported on a big screen adaptation assigned to U.S. scribe Skip Woods, whose credits include “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” and “A Good Day to Die Hard,”

Unsurprisingly, such a high-profile book has now sparked the interest of a new English-language publisher, Titan Comics, whose plans to aggressively increase the European originated section of their catalog were covered by Bleeding Cool recently

Now, on top of that, Titan wants to collect Universal One War, the whole 300 page shebang, into one single volume.

But first, they have to convince Denis Bajram. The one-man orchestra who writes, pencils, inks, colors and letters the Universal War saga, and who recently released in France the first installment of the long-awaited second part Universal War Two, is seriously ponder the offer he has received from Titan Books’ comic label.

At least, that’s what we can infer from this post on his Facebook wall, where he asks:

“Question aux pros du marché comics anglo-saxon : Universal War One en intégrale anglaise chez Titan Books, est-ce que ça vous parait être une bonne idée ?”

Yes, Denis, it does sound like a good idea…



Skip Woods Tapped To Pen ‘Universal War One’
UMedia is producing "Universal War One," based on the popular sci-fi graphic novel published by Marvel
Elsa Keslassy wrote:U.S. scribe Skip Woods, whose credits include “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” and “A Good Day to Die Hard,” is set to pen the bigscreen adaptation of epic sci-fi graphic novel “Universal War One.”

The live-action project – reportedly budgeted at about $40 million — is being developed by Adrian Politowski’s Brussels-based film production and finance group Umedia.

Published by Marvel and Gaul’s Soleil Prods., “Universal War One” was created by French author Denis Bajram. The six-part graphic novel has been translated into languages including German, Spanish, Dutch and Italian.

The action-packed dystopian tale is set in a world threatened by a looming civil war between the core planets and outlying planetary settlements. It follows the deadly mission of a band of disgraced soldiers who investigate a gigantic barrier in the outer reaches of space that absorbs all light and matter. After breaching it, the soldiers are fired upon by a vessel of unknown origin.

“Skip (Wood)’s work offers the grit and intelligence that permeates the world of ‘Universal War One,’” said Politowski. “He will undoubtedly retain the essence and spirit of adventure that has made Denis Bajram’s work such a masterpiece.”

Wood is repped by CAA and Sentient Entertainment.
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Metabarons Genesis: Castaka

Postby TheButcher on Fri Feb 14, 2014 7:52 pm

Al Shut wrote:I gave in and bought the first volume of Castaka, the Meabarons prequel (it was the cheapest of all the Jodorosky stuff)

:shock:

Strangly fascinating, certainly interesting and I although wouldn't call it actually good it was worth it.

'Metabaraons' Prequel From Jodorowsky and Das Pastoras
Nathan Wilson wrote:Arriving in March from Humanoids is the latest installment in the ongoing and highly successful Metabarons series, Metabarons Genesis: Castaka.

Now, Jodorowsky has teamed with Das Pastoras (Thor: God of Thunder) for an exploration of the Metabaron's origins and first ancestor Dayal de Castaka. Leader of a clan of lawless pirates, readers will find a far from noble beginning for the Metabarons.

The 112-page, color hardcover will be printed in Humanoids’ standard oversized, deluxe edition format. Retailing for $49.95, Metabarons Genesis: Castaka will be available for US audiences in March, and UK readers in May.

Initially emerging out of the vast universe Jodorowsky and Moebius created with The Incal, the original Metabarons ran for seventeen issues and has been collected entirely by Humanoids. 2010 saw Weapons of the Metabaron, an original hardcover graphic novel that detailed the character's rise to prominence and power. In 2012, Humanoids released a Metabarons Ultimate Colleciton, with an intro by Matt Fraction (see “’Metabarons Ultimate Collection’”).
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Feb 14, 2014 8:08 pm

THIS WEEK IN COMICS! (2/5/14 – One to Grow On)
Joe McCulloch wrote:Hey, it’s Das Pastoras drawing a huge fucking dragon! Always, always a pleasure to see this guy around; I recall discovering his stuff in issue #1 of the revived Métal Hurlant in July of ’02, about two months after I started reading comics again on a regular basis, and his huge, fleshy human-beast creatures really freaked me out. Every organic being in a Das Pastoras comic has the same putty-modeled, three-dimensional certainty you expect from Richard Corben, where even the most outlandish sights seem to possess some biological truth: tactile and unnerving, like you’re at a petting zoo at a local fair and you’re standing next to a really enormous ox or something you can’t even identify and you think “god, this thing could curl its head over and bite my neck open really easily and the last sight I’ll know is the polished emptiness of its hungry black eyes.” Das Pastoras captures that scope, that human diminution, that amorality very well. That earthiness. You can smell his comics.

I’ve since found bits and pieces of this artist’s stuff going back to Heavy Metal in 1995 (and his professional career in his native Spain dates to 12 years before that), though the most significant localized collection of Das Pastoras’ work thus far would have to be DC/Humanoids’ 2004 release of Deicide, an all-in-one package of two fantasy-comedy albums made in collaboration with writer Carlos Portela; Humanoids had previously released a hardcover translation of the first album almost as soon as it had dropped in France, so expectations for crossover success were presumably high. Unfortunately, the series never continued beyond part two’s cliffhanger, and before long its artist was working with Alejandro Jodorowsky on Castaka, a prequel to Jodorowsky’s & Juan Giménez’s The Metabarons, which just wrapped its initial serialization in French last year; an English translation is due soon.

However, this is not how most comic book readers know about the former Julio Martínez Pérez. In 2009, seemingly out of nowhere, Das Pastoras began publishing superhero work with Marvel: a pair of isolated Wolverine shorts (Switchback and Revolver, both collected in the trade paperback Flies to a Spider), and small stories in The Punisher MAX #75 and Deadpool: Merc With a Mouth #7. And then, all was quiet on the spandex front – until last week, when readers of this column alerted me to a new appearance by the artist in Thor: God of Thunder #18, written by Mr. Jason Aaron.
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Re: Metabarons Genesis: Castaka

Postby Al Shut on Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:22 pm

Al Shut wrote:I gave in and bought the first volume of Castaka, the Meabarons prequel (it was the cheapest of all the Jodorosky stuff)

:shock:

Strangly fascinating, certainly interesting and I although wouldn't call it actually good it was worth it.



Holy crap did I really write that?

Time must have made more critical because now I would call the book a mess. (Note that my volume is only about 50 pages so it's only the first half of what will be released soon)

Everyone follows bushitaka, some sort of questionable "code of honour" that serves as justification for various acts of genocide, suicide and some sorts of -cide I don't even know the names for.

Except when they don't feel like it. ("How naive, no rules without exception"). In fact compliance seems to be completely arbitrary. Which doesn't matter much because the code itself is so contradictory your head will start to hurt.

example

"I hate that guy and will kill him" "But your majesty, you must respect the bushitaka, so you have to honour him and give him a hug."

one page later after the hug

"You make me sick (actually starts puking). The bushitaka orders me to kill you, instead I will exile you"

some times later

"Damn, the bushitaka obliges me to make the guy I hate my successor, I will be doomed forever if I don't follow the law" "But6 your majesty, the bushitaka doesn't forbid murder"


And the the first half ends on a high note of nonsensical randomness when the main character, member of a voluntarily non spacetravelling society, survives the sudden and kind of unnecessary destruction of his planet because his hunting lodge turns out to be a spaceship and spontaneously decides that he and his family will become space pirates


The only thing more confusing is my initial post on this comic. :?
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Re: Metabarons Genesis: Castaka

Postby so sorry on Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:36 pm

Al Shut wrote:
Al Shut wrote:I gave in and bought the first volume of Castaka, the Meabarons prequel (it was the cheapest of all the Jodorosky stuff)

:shock:

Strangly fascinating, certainly interesting and I although wouldn't call it actually good it was worth it.



Holy crap did I really write that?

Time must have made more critical because now I would call the book a mess. (Note that my volume is only about 50 pages so it's only the first half of what will be released soon)

Everyone follows bushitaka, some sort of questionable "code of honour" that serves as justification for various acts of genocide, suicide and some sorts of -cide I don't even know the names for.

Except when they don't feel like it. ("How naive, no rules without exception"). In fact compliance seems to be completely arbitrary. Which doesn't matter much because the code itself is so contradictory your head will start to hurt.

example

"I hate that guy and will kill him" "But your majesty, you must respect the bushitaka, so you have to honour him and give him a hug."

one page later after the hug

"You make me sick (actually starts puking). The bushitaka orders me to kill you, instead I will exile you"

some times later

"Damn, the bushitaka obliges me to make the guy I hate my successor, I will be doomed forever if I don't follow the law" "But6 your majesty, the bushitaka doesn't forbid murder"


And the the first half ends on a high note of nonsensical randomness when the main character, member of a voluntarily non spacetravelling society, survives the sudden and kind of unnecessary destruction of his planet because his hunting lodge turns out to be a spaceship and spontaneously decides that he and his family will become space pirates


The only thing more confusing is my initial post on this comic. :?



I think I would have understood this post more if it was in German.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby Al Shut on Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:41 pm

Das möchte ich bezweifeln.
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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:12 pm

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Re: French Comics (Besides Tintin, Asterix, etc)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Aug 29, 2014 5:52 pm

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Re: Valerian

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jul 11, 2015 3:41 pm

The Story Behind 'Valerian,' the Most Important Sci-Fi Comic America Hasn't Heard Of
Introducing the source material behind Luc Besson's 2017 space opera.
Graeme McMillan wrote:Valerian, the comic strip serving as the basis for Luc Besson's forthcoming 2017 movie of the same name, is far from being well known in the United States, despite being one of the best-selling French comics of all time — and, it turns out, an inspiration for a number of far more famous sci-fi projects, including Star Wars and Besson's own The Fifth Element. Not bad for a onetime traveler and his redheaded love interest.

The series, created by Pierre Christin and Jean-Claude Mezieres, debuted in the anthology magazine Pilote — also home to Asterix and Moebius' classic Western Blueberry — in 1967. Its lead character is the eponymous Valerian, a handsome "spatio-temporal agent" tasked with protecting the 28th Century's Terran Galactic Empire from time paradoxes and problems caused by errant time travelers.

In fact, Valerian: Spatio-Temporal Agent was one of the series' alternate titles during its four-decade run; another was Valerian and Laureline, placing the hero's partner (in both professional and personal senses) on equal footing. Of the two leads of the strip, Laureline is by far the more interesting; while Valerian is a straightforward — if somewhat occasionally dim — hero, Laureline was born in the 11th century, ending up in the 28th after saving Valerian's life and demanding to return to the future with him. (More ambitious and less passive than her partner, Laureline was, according to Christin, inspired by the feminist movement of the late '60s.)

Valerian ran for 43 years, with the series being collected into 21 volumes, as well as an additional short-story collection and accompanying encyclopedia of the various characters, concepts and eras visited during that time. Along the way, the strip reinvented itself on occasion; the characters went from authority figures to freelance time travelers when their home time period disappeared thanks to a time paradox, for example, while the relatively uncomplicated adventure of initial stories became more nuanced as time went on, with Christin working in more political themes and influences.

The subject of influence is a tricky one when it comes to Valerian; it's widely considered to be a major, if almost entirely unrecognized, influence on George Lucas' Star Wars movies (as can be seen in these comparisons), and thanks to Mezieres' early '90s work with Besson, directly on The Fifth Element. The artist also has claimed to see elements of his work on the strip in Conan the Barbarian and 1996's Independence Day.

Whether that's just wishful thinking remains unclear, however; for all its success in Europe, Valerian has never managed to cross over to the U.S., in part because of an entirely irregular release schedule; multiple publishers, including Heavy Metal, NBM and iBooks have released parts of the series before abandoning the run due to lack of reader interest (or, in iBooks' case, bankruptcy).

With Besson's movie set for release two years from now, it's possible that American audiences could finally have a chance to warm to Valerian — assuming, of course, that some enterprising publisher decides to pick up the English-language rights and try to make it happen one more time.
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