Comic Book News & Previews

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Re: Osamu Tezuka's "Barbara"

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jan 17, 2012 6:30 am

DMP Launches Kickstarter Campaign to Translate Tezuka's Transgressive Manga "Barbara" - Publisher aims to raise $6,500 to release adult Tezuka work
Scott Green wrote:As part of its effort to accelerate the licensing and publishing of high-quality niche and classic manga in the United States, Digital Manga, Inc. launched a campaign on crowd-funding site Kickstarter to translate Barbara by Osamu Tezuka, an adult drama never before published in English
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby Tyrone_Shoelaces on Sat Mar 03, 2012 3:32 am

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:23 pm

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Wed Mar 28, 2012 10:53 pm

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Thu Apr 12, 2012 2:00 am

JEFF LEMIRE Talks UNDERWATER WELDER

Eisner nominee Jeff Lemire talks about this new 250-page graphic novel, 4 year in the making, UNDERWATER WELDER.
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Re: "GODZILLA:THE HALF CENTURY WAR" by James Stokoe

Postby TheButcher on Tue May 22, 2012 1:36 am

From Stokoe's blog:
Only Masers Can Keep Us Apart


From Ghetto Manga.com
PREVIEW- "GODZILLA:THE HALF CENTURY WAR" by James Stokoe

samax amen wrote:For all the James Stokoe fans out there, I just got a few pages from his upcoming IDW Godzilla comic, The Half Century War, as well as some pages from his creator-owned book, Orc Stain, which has slowed down lately. At least now I know why...

"Godzilla is something that has been near and dear to me since I was about 5 years old," Stokoe confessed on his blog "so this a dream come true for me." The 5-issue miniseries drops in August, and I expect it to be 5 issues of pure destruction in the Mighty Marvel Stokoe Manner! "Godzilla: The Half Century War is about a group of soldiers who have to test experimental weapons on Godzilla." he explains "Each issue takes place a decade after the last, all over the world, so I get to play with Godzilla through the ages. I promise Mothra hippies, drill tanks, and a proper monster showdown in Antarctica."

I knew this was the perfect project for Stokes after seeing this Godzilla World War G short he drew back in the day, just for kicks. Anyone who has ever tried to draw comics (even way less detailed than this) can cosign on my theory that this dude is some kind of evil genius. Thankfully rather than destroying us all, he limits himself to creating worlds on paper, and destroying THEM instead.

Anyways, in case this Godzilla story and the limited edition baseball horror hardcover Sullivan's Sluggers that's he's currently Kickstarting with Mark Andrew Smith had you afraid that Stokes was totally abandoning his creator-owned monster epic Orc Stain, here's some pages to tide you over.

Yeah, you're welcome. Anyways, I have my OWN drawing to do, so I best get to it before looking at these pages makes me fall on my sword or something!
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Mon May 28, 2012 6:48 pm

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheBaxter on Fri Jun 01, 2012 12:25 pm

the green lantern is Dumbledore


and now i finally understand why they cast Ryan Reynolds in that role.
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby so sorry on Fri Jun 01, 2012 12:28 pm

TheBaxter wrote:the green lantern is Dumbledore


and now i finally understand why they cast Ryan Reynolds in that role.



Rainbow Corps?
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:59 pm

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Re: Get Jiro

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:00 pm

Last edited by TheButcher on Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:02 pm

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jun 26, 2012 5:51 am

From CA:
Link Ink: Unpublished Frazetta Sketches, Moore Movies and Anti-Venom Action
Caleb Goellner wrote:Upcoming: Vanguard Publishing has announced that the hardcover edition of The Frazetta Sketchbook will arrive in stores on December 26 and include 160 pages of previously unpublished drawings and painting preliminaries by the artist. [ICv2]
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Re: Get Jiro

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:39 am

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Re: Shmuggy & Bimbo

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 29, 2012 4:08 pm

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Re: CHEW

Postby TheButcher on Mon Jul 02, 2012 5:54 am

From CS:
Comic-Con: The Full Schedule for Friday, July 13
2:30-3:30 Spotlight on Chew: John Layman and Rob Guillory— Writer/letterer John Layman and artist Rob Guillory discuss the past, present, and future of their New York Times bestselling and multi-Eisner Award-winning cannibal cop crime comedy Chew from Image Comics. Marvel over Layman's preternatural handsomeness, while Guillory engages the audience with his sardonic wit. Room 8
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Sat Sep 15, 2012 6:31 am

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Re: Free Comic Book Day 2012 Part 2!!!

Postby TheButcher on Wed Oct 03, 2012 5:25 am

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Re: Frank Quitely's 'Jupiter's Children'

Postby TheButcher on Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:42 am

First Look: Mark Millar & Frank Quitely's 'Jupiter's Children' (Heat Vision Exclusive)
Heat Vision presents the first glimpse of the new superhero saga. While Hollywood is being kept at bay for now, Millar and artist partner Frank Quitely are hoping it's the next "Lord of the Rings."

Borys Kit wrote:Jupiter’s Children is one project Mark Millar is keeping away from Hollywood. For now, anyway.

Millar and his artist partner Frank Quitely are unveiling the 12-issue miniseries, a superhero sci-fi epic, early next year. Millar is hoping this will be his Lord of the Rings or Star Wars, a vast story involving a large cast of characters spread out over many generations.

Millar usually is eager to sell his creations to studios and producers, sometimes even before the comic is published. His Wanted and Kick-Ass went on to become hit adaptations, Kick-Ass 2 is in production, and several other comics, such as Nemesis and The Secret Service, are in development with Joe Carnahan and Matthew Vaughan attached.

But with Children, Millar wants to wait until he’s finished the first miniseries (he plans three volumes) before he opens the development door.

“It’s a story I've been thinking about for the past five years. It's a massively ambitious project and planned as an enormous trilogy, the first one being I think the best thing I've ever written,” Millar tells Heat Vision.

And while Millar also is keeping the plot under wraps, we at Heat Vision are proud to exclusively show off Children's main cast of characters. (A note: Millar woudn't reveal the names of the characters or their powers.)

Children takes a multigenerational approach to tell a story of the offspring of superheroes who haven’t lived up to the standards of their parents, who first got their powers in the '20s after the discovery of a mysterious island.

“We have the last remains of these old-school heroes and their mainly vacuous children living in L.A., a massive disappointment to the first generation of super-people and just lost, no real direction in their lives beyond advertising gigs and opening night clubs," the writer says. "This is literally where we find everyone and then we go into the future, taking these guys on a journey like we've never seen in comics before.

Millar says everything he’s ever written has been a prologue to this story, which he sees as vast and epic as Tolkien’s Rings or Lucas’ Star Wars.

“From Superman: Red Son to The Ultimates to Wanted to Kick-Ass, I guess I've been kind of training for this one. I love Batman and I love The Avengers, but they're either set in Gotham City with a solo lead or we're talking about maybe seven superheroes fighting a single antagonist. What I'm proposing here is a universe of characters, who have been around for a while and a vast network and world we can play with. ... This kind of scale, this event-level storyline, is something I don't think I'd have been ready for before. This is what I've been buidling to."



Exclusive: Frank Quitely's 'Jupiter's Children' (Photos)
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Re: The Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion

Postby TheButcher on Wed Dec 19, 2012 3:23 am

Comics Alliance:
Gerard Way And Scott Allie On 'Killjoys' And The Future Of ' The Umbrella Academy' [Interview]
Caleb Goellner wrote:Even though it's been more than three years since the last issue of the second volume of The Umbrella Academy, the sci-fi family saga illustrated by Gabriel Bá is never far from writer Gerard Way's mind. The My Chemical Romance frontman just got a little busy between starting a family, touring the world, and releasing Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys and working on its similarly-titled comic with Shaun Simon, Becky Cloonan and Dave Stewart. Finding himself with a moment to catch his breath, Way traveled to Portland, Oregon last week to work on the latest chapter of the UA saga, Hotel Oblivion, with his longtime editor and current Editor-in-Chief of Dark Horse Comics, Scott Allie. Way and Allie took a break from planning the future of the Hargreeves children to catch ComicsAlliance up on where The Umbrella Academy is headed, and what fans can expect from the Killjoys comic when it debuts this summer.

ComicsAlliance: It's been a couple years, there's been kind of an extended wait for the newest book - and it's still [called] "Hotel Oblivion," right?

Gerard Way: Yeah, it is.

CA: Can you kind of catch me up the timeline from the initial teaser announcement a couple of years ago to now?

GW: I think that right away I pretty much knew what I wanted series three to be about, and I knew it was going to be about this hotel that [Sir Reginald] Hargreeves had built to keep everybody that [The Umbrella Academy] encountered who were extremely dangerous - he built this hotel to keep them in this kind of pocket dimension. So I knew that right away, and I had this image in my head that I talked to Gabriel [Bá] about drawing and I said, "This is definitely what it's going to look like." It's a hotel a lot like this one. It's some old hotel. Then he created that image and I think we thought we were going to get it going a lot sooner than we have.

CA: So he's still drawing the third series for sure?

GW: Yeah, I mean as far as I'm concerned Gab will always draw it. If Gab's too busy to draw it, I'll just wait for him. Whenever I have an arc completed for him to draw, I just always want him to be the artist on it.

CA: It's kind of like keeping a band together.

GW: Yeah, completely. He just kind of gets the world. He immediately got it. Because I couldn't draw it. I drew a lot of the initial characters, but I didn't draw any buildings - I just described this stuff and he really got it right away, and what it was.

CA: You've given a basic setup for this latest series, can you tease what you've come up with since your initial concept?

GW: I guess it hasn't changed from its initial concept. I really do want the story to be about a couple of different things this time. Obviously it's always going to be about the family, but I really did want it to be about the hotel and occupants and I really want it to be about this newer character we're going to introduce in the new series. They have a very compelling story that will connect with The Umbrella Academy and just be a really interesting character to have in there.

CA: Every series has something of a time jump, or covers a different era. Can you say anything about when the comic will take place in this storyline?

GW: Pretty much right after [Dallas]

Scott Allie: Yeah, actually the second one came right after the first one, didn't it?

GW: Right. The flashbacks make it seem like time jumps around a lot.

SA: But the main story flowed right after the first one and this one is the same way. It's been a long break for us, but story three will pick up pretty much right where two left off. In fact, in a lot of ways it seeks to resolve stuff that was still at a high pitch at the tend of two.

GW: Right, right.

CA: Since you started the series your life has changed a lot. You as a person have gotten married, had a kid. How has that shaped your perspective and shaped the way that you want to tell this story, especially considering its family themes?

GW: What's interesting about that question is, there's actually a situation or scenario in Hotel Oblivion that has very much to do with the pressure of being just about to have a kid. That comes up. And that was always in there, I think, even before I had a kid.

SA: Yeah, for sure. That's interesting, I didn't think about that before, but that hasn't changed at all. But what's changed is how work gets done. That's what's totally different because of life changes.

GW: For both of us, too. Now you're Editor-in-Chief, but even before that. We went from being relatively busy. I mean I was in a band touring the world, he was editing Hellboy and The Goon and tons of other great books, but then it seemed like we had a lot more time even though we were both busy and then both of our lives got incredibly difficultly busy. I think it just kind of comes with age? I don't know.

SA: Yeah, both our lives changed drastically and things got a lot harder. It's funny looking back Sierra [Hahn, Editor at Dark Horse] and I talk about this a lot, like, "How is it that we were able to crank out these two series in such a short amount of time?" In a way it's weird that it's taken us so long to get to the third one, but it's almost just as strange that we were able to do those two six-issue series, because we started the first one right as The Black Parade was about to come out, which was the point where MCR really blew up, and during that whole explosion we managed to jam out two six-issue series that were pretty time-intensive for everybody - Bá most of all of us. We managed to do it all. But again, then life managed to change really drastically. It's been harder to be as full-time on Umbrella for either of us.

GW: Yeah, it was almost like recovering from two-and-a-half really intense years and dealing with the aftermath of that. So that was maybe what slowed the process down. Recovering and looking back and saying "Holy crap, we just spent two-and-a-half years doing all this stuff," without batting an eyelash or realizing what we were doing while we were doing it and I guess there was a moment of "Whoah." It wasn't intentional like, "Let's slow down a minute."

SA: Yeah, it wasn't intentional, but I think we had this crazy momentum and then we blinked and years went by. We let the moment stop and had to heat back up both for him to do Killjoys and Umbrella and anything else going. It's just taken a long time to get any of that momentum going again and that's why he's in town. We felt like face-to-face was really the way to kick start it.


CA: A couple of years ago, Umbrella Academy got optioned for a film, around the time Dallas came out. Has there been any movement with the film at all, or is it hanging out in Hollywood for now?

GW: I'd say it's hanging out a little bit. Every once in awhile there's a burst of movement and it's kind of how I've noticed Hollywood works. There's a burst of movement and then a burst of nothing. We actually recently got a script and it's really great, so I think it's just a matter of waiting for [Universal Studios] wanting to take the risk on it.

CA: It's not really a small budget film.

GW: Well the good news is that it's not as big as it was before, which actually takes a lot of the pressure off the storytelling in the script and made it so things could exist like Space[boy] still being half a Martian gorilla, Bobo still being a chimp - you know what I mean? Those are things that, when your budget starts to get higher and higher you notice that discussions will start to happen like, "Well, let's maybe phase some of this weird stuff out." So, your budget getting smaller is sometimes the best thing that can happen.

CA: Back to Scott mentioning Killjoys - that's a project that's already in motion. There's already an on-sale date, you've got the Free Comic Book Day issue coming out in May and then the actual miniseries in June. How far ahead have you worked on that and how much is already ready to print and all set?

GW: Well, we've been working on that for so long, and because I have a really great partner on it [co-writer Shaun Simon], script-wise we're in great shape and Becky [Cloonan] is drawing it right now, so it's moving like Umbrella was moving. It's moving forward.

SA: Half the scripts are done and there's drafts of the rest.

CA: Killjoys was another project that got announced and then there was some quiet time as far as promotion and talking about it, and now it's coming for sure. Do you think that break that you were talking about before -- letting the dust settle for a second and starting back up -- do you think that's improved the final products of both Hotel Oblivion and Killjoys?

GW: Yeah, that's the greatest benefit of the break, which another thing about that break is important to point out is that we were recording an album. So it was weird because I guess the extracurricular activities I would do or the other stuff I was doing meant it really wasn't a break at all. So that was difficult.

SA: And originally Killjoys was just a comic and then it was an album and a comic, but the album had to get done first. And now the comic is a completely different comic than it was going to be. The reason is that the Killjoys that he originally conceived is so different from the Killjoys that's about to come out, because the album did a certain amount of what the original intent was. So there's different characters and a whole different arc. The hiatus made it better, but it also transformed it into a whole different thing.

CA: Since the comic is so linked to the album, is that going to change how you promote the comic and how you talk to your fans about it? Umbrella Academy wasn't a My Chemical Romance comic. With this you can talk to your fanbase and point out that the comic can be an extra component of the last album. What are the pros and cons of a project linked to your band?

GW: That's always been really important. That'll work itself out as organically as possible. I've never been really interested in trying to force people that like the band to like any comic I make, even one that's tied in to the record. Obviously it's a lot more connected to the band, but I still don't want to force that on them.

SA: Yeah, and it's not a My Chemical Romance comic. You could make that assumption, but it's not, it is different enough. We were very careful with Umbrella, about how much we exploited MCR. We were very careful and we set up a lot of rules along the way about how much we would use that name. We'll probably be a little more liberal about it with Killjoys just because you can't miss the fact that it's the same title.

CA: You'd done some other comics work before [Umbrella Academy] and you had a very comics-intensive background and fandom, but you weren't obnoxious with it and the original marketing message for Umbrella that started in the first issue's letter page kind of said, "This isn't a guy in a band doing comics, this is a comics guy in a band doing comics" and then the comic came out and spoke for itself and generated the fanbase it has so you didn't have to have a dual identity anymore. What do you think is the most liberating thing about being where you're at now with comics as opposed to when you had just put out the first issue of Umbrella Academy?

GW: You know, that's interesting. It makes sense that I had to prove it. That made a lot of sense in that there are unfortunately a lot of vanity projects. Every time you go to Comic-Con that's actually mostly what you're looking at is weird vanity projects by people who are just kind of moonlighting in comics because they're assuming that it's what's generating movie deals or whatever. I guess I knew that because the work was special and because of my background, I felt very safe. I wasn't really nervous when it came out. I knew that when it came out it was going to prove that it was a very real comic. And again, Dark Horse being extremely careful with how they promoted the book -- you didn't see writeups in Rolling Stone, or even Spin or anything.

SA: Yeah, we were very conscious of it, I don't know how self-conscious [Way] was, but we were self-conscious of "Well, is he going to be viewed that way and is the whole book going to be dismissed because of that?" And now we don't have to think about that. Umbrella won a shitload of awards and sold really well. So we had the critical success and a fan success. So now it's like, "Okay, Gerard does comics" and we don't have to worry about it that way. I'm glad we lead with a book that was just a comic and had no connection to the music world before doing [Killjoys]. If Killjoys had been your first comic and it had the same name as a record, it would've been hard to make that clear.

GW: I almost didn't even want to do it as a comic for that reason, because I felt a fair amount of safety and protected by my work in comics. It was really a giant risk to go ahead and make Killjoys a comic because I didn't want to screw that up. I wanted people who were just fans of my comic work to be able to enjoy it so they didn't have to go back and listen to the record.
Dec 18th 2012 By: Caleb Goellner

Gerard Way And Scott Allie On 'Killjoys' And The Future Of ' The Umbrella Academy' [Interview]
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Even though it's been more than three years since the last issue of the second volume of The Umbrella Academy, the sci-fi family saga illustrated by Gabriel Bá is never far from writer Gerard Way's mind. The My Chemical Romance frontman just got a little busy between starting a family, touring the world, and releasing Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys and working on its similarly-titled comic with Shaun Simon, Becky Cloonan and Dave Stewart. Finding himself with a moment to catch his breath, Way traveled to Portland, Oregon last week to work on the latest chapter of the UA saga, Hotel Oblivion, with his longtime editor and current Editor-in-Chief of Dark Horse Comics, Scott Allie. Way and Allie took a break from planning the future of the Hargreeves children to catch ComicsAlliance up on where The Umbrella Academy is headed, and what fans can expect from the Killjoys comic when it debuts this summer. You can read the full interview after the jump.

ComicsAlliance: It's been a couple years, there's been kind of an extended wait for the newest book - and it's still [called] "Hotel Oblivion," right?

Gerard Way: Yeah, it is.

CA: Can you kind of catch me up the timeline from the initial teaser announcement a couple of years ago to now?

GW: I think that right away I pretty much knew what I wanted series three to be about, and I knew it was going to be about this hotel that [Sir Reginald] Hargreeves had built to keep everybody that [The Umbrella Academy] encountered who were extremely dangerous - he built this hotel to keep them in this kind of pocket dimension. So I knew that right away, and I had this image in my head that I talked to Gabriel [Bá] about drawing and I said, "This is definitely what it's going to look like." It's a hotel a lot like this one. It's some old hotel. Then he created that image and I think we thought we were going to get it going a lot sooner than we have.

CA: So he's still drawing the third series for sure?

GW: Yeah, I mean as far as I'm concerned Gab will always draw it. If Gab's too busy to draw it, I'll just wait for him. Whenever I have an arc completed for him to draw, I just always want him to be the artist on it.

CA: It's kind of like keeping a band together.

GW: Yeah, completely. He just kind of gets the world. He immediately got it. Because I couldn't draw it. I drew a lot of the initial characters, but I didn't draw any buildings - I just described this stuff and he really got it right away, and what it was.

CA: You've given a basic setup for this latest series, can you tease what you've come up with since your initial concept?

GW: I guess it hasn't changed from its initial concept. I really do want the story to be about a couple of different things this time. Obviously it's always going to be about the family, but I really did want it to be about the hotel and occupants and I really want it to be about this newer character we're going to introduce in the new series. They have a very compelling story that will connect with The Umbrella Academy and just be a really interesting character to have in there.

CA: Every series has something of a time jump, or covers a different era. Can you say anything about when the comic will take place in this storyline?

GW: Pretty much right after [Dallas]

Scott Allie: Yeah, actually the second one came right after the first one, didn't it?

GW: Right. The flashbacks make it seem like time jumps around a lot.

SA: But the main story flowed right after the first one and this one is the same way. It's been a long break for us, but story three will pick up pretty much right where two left off. In fact, in a lot of ways it seeks to resolve stuff that was still at a high pitch at the tend of two.

GW: Right, right.



CA: Since you started the series your life has changed a lot. You as a person have gotten married, had a kid. How has that shaped your perspective and shaped the way that you want to tell this story, especially considering its family themes?

GW: What's interesting about that question is, there's actually a situation or scenario in Hotel Oblivion that has very much to do with the pressure of being just about to have a kid. That comes up. And that was always in there, I think, even before I had a kid.

SA: Yeah, for sure. That's interesting, I didn't think about that before, but that hasn't changed at all. But what's changed is how work gets done. That's what's totally different because of life changes.

GW: For both of us, too. Now you're Editor-in-Chief, but even before that. We went from being relatively busy. I mean I was in a band touring the world, he was editing Hellboy and The Goon and tons of other great books, but then it seemed like we had a lot more time even though we were both busy and then both of our lives got incredibly difficultly busy. I think it just kind of comes with age? I don't know.

SA: Yeah, both our lives changed drastically and things got a lot harder. It's funny looking back Sierra [Hahn, Editor at Dark Horse] and I talk about this a lot, like, "How is it that we were able to crank out these two series in such a short amount of time?" In a way it's weird that it's taken us so long to get to the third one, but it's almost just as strange that we were able to do those two six-issue series, because we started the first one right as The Black Parade was about to come out, which was the point where MCR really blew up, and during that whole explosion we managed to jam out two six-issue series that were pretty time-intensive for everybody - Bá most of all of us. We managed to do it all. But again, then life managed to change really drastically. It's been harder to be as full-time on Umbrella for either of us.

GW: Yeah, it was almost like recovering from two-and-a-half really intense years and dealing with the aftermath of that. So that was maybe what slowed the process down. Recovering and looking back and saying "Holy crap, we just spent two-and-a-half years doing all this stuff," without batting an eyelash or realizing what we were doing while we were doing it and I guess there was a moment of "Whoah." It wasn't intentional like, "Let's slow down a minute."

SA: Yeah, it wasn't intentional, but I think we had this crazy momentum and then we blinked and years went by. We let the moment stop and had to heat back up both for him to do Killjoys and Umbrella and anything else going. It's just taken a long time to get any of that momentum going again and that's why he's in town. We felt like face-to-face was really the way to kick start it.


CA: A couple of years ago, Umbrella Academy got optioned for a film, around the time Dallas came out. Has there been any movement with the film at all, or is it hanging out in Hollywood for now?

GW: I'd say it's hanging out a little bit. Every once in awhile there's a burst of movement and it's kind of how I've noticed Hollywood works. There's a burst of movement and then a burst of nothing. We actually recently got a script and it's really great, so I think it's just a matter of waiting for [Universal Studios] wanting to take the risk on it.

CA: It's not really a small budget film.

GW: Well the good news is that it's not as big as it was before, which actually takes a lot of the pressure off the storytelling in the script and made it so things could exist like Space[boy] still being half a Martian gorilla, Bobo still being a chimp - you know what I mean? Those are things that, when your budget starts to get higher and higher you notice that discussions will start to happen like, "Well, let's maybe phase some of this weird stuff out." So, your budget getting smaller is sometimes the best thing that can happen.

CA: Back to Scott mentioning Killjoys - that's a project that's already in motion. There's already an on-sale date, you've got the Free Comic Book Day issue coming out in May and then the actual miniseries in June. How far ahead have you worked on that and how much is already ready to print and all set?

GW: Well, we've been working on that for so long, and because I have a really great partner on it [co-writer Shaun Simon], script-wise we're in great shape and Becky [Cloonan] is drawing it right now, so it's moving like Umbrella was moving. It's moving forward.

SA: Half the scripts are done and there's drafts of the rest.

CA: Killjoys was another project that got announced and then there was some quiet time as far as promotion and talking about it, and now it's coming for sure. Do you think that break that you were talking about before -- letting the dust settle for a second and starting back up -- do you think that's improved the final products of both Hotel Oblivion and Killjoys?

GW: Yeah, that's the greatest benefit of the break, which another thing about that break is important to point out is that we were recording an album. So it was weird because I guess the extracurricular activities I would do or the other stuff I was doing meant it really wasn't a break at all. So that was difficult.

SA: And originally Killjoys was just a comic and then it was an album and a comic, but the album had to get done first. And now the comic is a completely different comic than it was going to be. The reason is that the Killjoys that he originally conceived is so different from the Killjoys that's about to come out, because the album did a certain amount of what the original intent was. So there's different characters and a whole different arc. The hiatus made it better, but it also transformed it into a whole different thing.

CA: Since the comic is so linked to the album, is that going to change how you promote the comic and how you talk to your fans about it? Umbrella Academy wasn't a My Chemical Romance comic. With this you can talk to your fanbase and point out that the comic can be an extra component of the last album. What are the pros and cons of a project linked to your band?

GW: That's always been really important. That'll work itself out as organically as possible. I've never been really interested in trying to force people that like the band to like any comic I make, even one that's tied in to the record. Obviously it's a lot more connected to the band, but I still don't want to force that on them.

SA: Yeah, and it's not a My Chemical Romance comic. You could make that assumption, but it's not, it is different enough. We were very careful with Umbrella, about how much we exploited MCR. We were very careful and we set up a lot of rules along the way about how much we would use that name. We'll probably be a little more liberal about it with Killjoys just because you can't miss the fact that it's the same title.

CA: You'd done some other comics work before [Umbrella Academy] and you had a very comics-intensive background and fandom, but you weren't obnoxious with it and the original marketing message for Umbrella that started in the first issue's letter page kind of said, "This isn't a guy in a band doing comics, this is a comics guy in a band doing comics" and then the comic came out and spoke for itself and generated the fanbase it has so you didn't have to have a dual identity anymore. What do you think is the most liberating thing about being where you're at now with comics as opposed to when you had just put out the first issue of Umbrella Academy?

GW: You know, that's interesting. It makes sense that I had to prove it. That made a lot of sense in that there are unfortunately a lot of vanity projects. Every time you go to Comic-Con that's actually mostly what you're looking at is weird vanity projects by people who are just kind of moonlighting in comics because they're assuming that it's what's generating movie deals or whatever. I guess I knew that because the work was special and because of my background, I felt very safe. I wasn't really nervous when it came out. I knew that when it came out it was going to prove that it was a very real comic. And again, Dark Horse being extremely careful with how they promoted the book -- you didn't see writeups in Rolling Stone, or even Spin or anything.

SA: Yeah, we were very conscious of it, I don't know how self-conscious [Way] was, but we were self-conscious of "Well, is he going to be viewed that way and is the whole book going to be dismissed because of that?" And now we don't have to think about that. Umbrella won a shitload of awards and sold really well. So we had the critical success and a fan success. So now it's like, "Okay, Gerard does comics" and we don't have to worry about it that way. I'm glad we lead with a book that was just a comic and had no connection to the music world before doing [Killjoys]. If Killjoys had been your first comic and it had the same name as a record, it would've been hard to make that clear.

GW: I almost didn't even want to do it as a comic for that reason, because I felt a fair amount of safety and protected by my work in comics. It was really a giant risk to go ahead and make Killjoys a comic because I didn't want to screw that up. I wanted people who were just fans of my comic work to be able to enjoy it so they didn't have to go back and listen to the record.


CA: There's an entire fanbase or group of people who see you as Gerard Way the comic book writer and artist - they may not even care about your band. Do you like having that whole different side of your career as an artist?

GW: Yeah, I absolutely love that. If there was just kind of one side to me -- or to anybody -- I think that would be really boring. So to have people be able to appreciate equally different things and not even be that aware of the other component? That's fine. I think I'll always be involved with stuff like that in my life. If I ever do get to maybe make a film, I would expect people who go to see that film to not know about the two different other component, be it comics or music or anything else. That's kind of how I always want to do it. So I'm actually really happy that I'll do a signing, and sure there'll be some people who really like MCR and Umbrella Academy, but there'll be a lot of people who are just, y'know a guy in a Superman shirt or a lady in a Star Trek shirt or something. That's really cool because you can tell that not only do they have a different side to them, but that also they really like your comic book. So not only does it not bother me, I actually really like it. It's a nice escape to have that duality.

CA: Your brother [Mikey Way] has also done some comics work - he's done stuff for DC. If you google you guys and "comics," there's always a rumor that you'll do something together eventually. Do you have anything planned right now or is that still kind of off in the distance?

GW: Nothing planned with him. He's been writing a lot. He really wants to dive into writing horror novels. I can see him doing that at the same time as trying to write comics. He's definitely interested in them. I think he's still developing what he wants to say in comics. And he's got a bit more time when he can do that. He's got some room to stretch.

CA: You've kind of become a fixture at conventions now with MorrisonCon and Comic-Con and New York Comic Con. Do you have specific plans to promote Killjoys this summer or do you have to look at touring plans, then see what you can do with cons?

GW: Hopefully I'll be at everything I usually have, which is San Diego and New York. I'd like to do some other cons this time for Killjoys as well. When Umbrella comes out I'd like to try to go to Brazil with the twins [Bá and his brother Fábio Moon] or Australia. I'd really try to go more globally to promote that book. The hope is that we do series three and try to rush right in to series four like we did with the first two arcs. That'll be really nice to be involved with Gabriel for a lengthy stretch of time and maybe do some signings with him.

CA: Now you just mentioned series four and I can't let you mention it without going "Oh, so what's series four about, what's it called?" Can you say anything about that yet?

GW: I can't. I guess I could say that it is... I think four to me is less of an exercise and a study and more of a kind of heavy epoch movement forward. That's not to say the stuff that's going to happen in Hotel isn't valuable or doesn't move the story forward, but in the basic, most bare bones plot of the Umbrella Academy being the 43 extraordinary kids -- Hargreeves, all that basic stuff -- series four deals mainly with that element and it's going to move that forward. Eventually my hope is that by the time we get to eight or nine, you'll know exactly what The Umbrella Academy was and is and what they're supposed to be doing.

CA: So we're going to be seeing eight or nine series?

GW: Yeah.

SA: That was always the plan.

GW: I think I've always said I wanted to do eight.

SA: Stuff changes a lot. Like, Hotel Oblivion, I think since early in Dallas we knew that Hotel Oblivion was next, but this week we've been banging around a lot of the big parts of what happens in Hotel Oblivion and there's a thing that came up yesterday that we realized was too big to co-exist with Hotel Oblivion in the same series, so it was like, "Well that could be the big thing in series four." He has a plan for all of it, but it's also really flexible. There's big things and I think the ultimate endgame is pretty well worked out. The ideas on Umbrella are so weird that they gotta stay fluid so that new things can show up. I wondered when he came up here to talk about it to try to work it all out - I wondered if Hotel Oblivion was even going to still be the focus of the next one. Just because it had been so long and all that. I was glad to see that that's still the main story, but the way the hotel impacts the kids changed just this week.

GW: I guess I'll say this. Hotel Oblivion was originally very much a study in the hotel to the point where it may have been borderline alienating to a fan of either graphic novel that had come out. So it was really almost like this weird slice of life, like you're getting all these different vignettes about this hotel. So now it has a very major effect on the characters. It's a component that I think will be around now in all subsequent series.


CA: Is there anything else you want to mention or talk about?

GW: I really missed working with Scott and I really missed Gabriel a lot. He and his brother do amazing work and they're very actively busy still, but it will be nice to work with Gabriel again.

SA: You get that momentum back. Right now I don't know if the twins are working on multiple things, but they're doing a B.P.R.D. series for us and I know of other things they have lined up, so it's not a case where if Gerard produces a script for issue one this week, it's not like it's going to go right onto Gabriel's desk. But we were in that real golden space where we were just working on Umbrella Academy full time. If Hotel Oblivion can get that back into gear where it's a constant part of all our lives, that'd be great. Working with the twins is one of the most inspiring parts of my 18 years in comics. These guys blow my mind every time. Their love and passion and creativity - I always want that in the mix of what I'm doing. So when we got them on Vampire, I knew I could count on the next six or seven months to have a lot of twins in my life.

GW: It's kind of funny, I'm almost saying the same thing as him, but if you ever get to meet the twins you'll know what we're saying. They have a vibrancy for life. I've never met anybody.

CA: Yeah, they're really... gentle? I guess. My first Comic-Con -- not to intersperse the interview with my own story, but it was 2009 and I was doing panel reports -- like five or six a day -- and partying at night and I was just miserable by day three. I had to sit through a panel to get to the one I was covering and it turned out to be the twins. They came out and they were angelic and glowing and I'd just been hammered over the head with all these comic and movie announcements for projects that may never happen and these two very real comic guys who I'd been following for awhile start talking about their love of the medium and it was like, "Okay, I like comics again. I guess I can come back next year."

SA: I need the twins.

GW: They have a gift. And they also have the ability to -- there's nothing in this world that could break either of them down or change their work ethic or take away their creativity. There's nothing that exists that could do that. There's not a mortgage in the world or a stress or a deadline or anything that's going to mess with them. They just remain who and what they are, they're so pure. To be around that is very infectious. So it's weird. I want Gab back in my life. I'm writing this to have him back in my life and hopefully up until we finish it.
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Re: Primates

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:31 am

Looking Forward, Looking Back | Creators weigh in on 2012 and 2013 (Part 1)
JIM OTTAVIANI (Feynman, T-Minus: The Race to the Moon)

Primates

What was your favorite comic of 2012?

I must cheat, and give more than one: One Soul/Ray Fawkes; Harvey Pekar’s Cleveland/Harvey Pekar and Joseph Remnant; Drama/Raina Telgemeier; The Mighty Alice/Richard Thompson; The Score/Darwyn Cooke; Big Questions/Anders Nilsen; Sailor Twain/Mark Siegel. They’re all too different, and too good, to place one above the others.

Comic-wise, what are you most excited about for 2013?

I haven’t kept up, so I don’t know what’s in store [in 2013] for me. I look forward to reading the other responses!

What’s one project you’re personally working on for 2013 that you’re especially pumped about?

Again, I cheat: Coming in 2013, with art by Maris Wicks: Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas (First Second). Also, with 99 percent certainty, The Imitation Game (a book about Alan Turing) with art by Leland Purvis.
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Re: DOUBLECROSS

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:32 am

Offset Comics: Ivan Brandon Reveals Details Of New Publishing Venture [Interview]

Read More: http://www.comicsalliance.com/2012/10/1 ... z2Gj6guVXZ
Andy Khouri wrote:Teased as far back as Comic-Con weekend in July, Offset Comics is an enigmatic new project devised by Ivan Brandon (writer, Viking, Men of War; editor 24Seven) that's set to launch "soon." Some very handsome illustrations by talented co-conspirators Daniel Krall, Chuck BB and Eric Canete have been released very quietly here and there, offering vague hints, but otherwise very little is known about what Offset is or what it intends to offer.

Brandon and co. will set up shop at this weekend's New York Comic Con to sell some limited edition wares and answer questions for curious parties. One of those curious parties was me, and I spoke with Ivan Brandon in advance of the event to find out more of what ComicsAlliance's particularly aesthetic-conscious readers can anticipate from this ambitious new... thing.

Brandon confirmed for ComicsAlliance the first three Offset projects, which break down thusly:

DOUBLECROSS by Daniel Krall

"He was the brains behind their operation. An integral part of their plan to hold back a tide of shadows. Then the shadows put in a higher bid."
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Re: Captain America

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 23, 2013 2:02 am

It Could Be A War Crime To Use Biologically Enhanced Soldiers
George Dvorsky wrote:Earlier this month, a report funded by the Greenwall Foundation examined the legal and ethical implications of using biologically enhanced humans on the battlefield. Given the Pentagon's open acknowledgement that it's working to create super-soldiers, this is quickly becoming a pertinent issue. We wanted to learn more, so we contacted one of the study's authors. He told us that the use of cyber-soldiers could very well be interpreted as a violation of international law. Here's why.
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Fri Mar 01, 2013 3:53 am

iFanboy Upstarts: Kilian Eng
Chris Arrant wrote:There’s more than one way to be an artist in comics. While some follow the standard path of blind-submitting to the Big Two or making their name on the independent scene, some artists do comics on their own terms — and do many other things besides comics.

Swedish artist Kilian Eng channels the classic work of artists like Syd Mead and Moebius to create stunning works both post-modern and classical. Although Eng admires the work of comic art, to date he has only done one comic of his own — a short prestige-format graphic novel titled Syklus with writer Martin Ernstsen. This ultra-rare tome shows the cycle of the ending of the world and a look into what comes next, skirting the lines between surrealism and classic science fiction.

Recently, Portland’s own Floating World Comics published a monograph of Eng’s illustration and graphic design work titled Object 5, and the artist later contributed to the comic stories’ tribute to The Incal. This work potentially foreshadows more work from Eng aimed at American audiences in the future, and is something any fan of art or comics should look for. Eng’s currently working on a follow-up to Syklus along with an animated film project based on his work.

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Re: Steve Ditko's Monsters

Postby TheButcher on Sat Mar 02, 2013 3:10 am

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:26 am

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Re: The Star Wars

Postby TheButcher on Sun Mar 31, 2013 8:09 pm

Dark Horse To Adapt George Lucas’ Original Concept, The Star Wars, Into Comics – Anakin Starkiller, General Luke Skywalker And More

Joshua Stone writes from WonderCon for Bleeding Cool; At WondeCon, Dark Horse announces new eight issue Star Wars series for September – The Star Wars. Based on George Lucas‘ original concept that eventually became the Star Wars films.
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Re: The Star Wars

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 01, 2013 6:18 am

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Re: The Star Wars

Postby TheButcher on Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:35 pm

‘The Star Wars!’ Dark Horse gives Lucas script comic book treatment
Jevon Phillips wrote:The Force is strong with Dark Horse Comics editor in chief Scott Allie.

The Oregon-based company recently announced plans to publish George Lucas’ original screenplay for “Star Wars” as an eight-issue comic series launching in September, adapted by Lucasfilm executive editor and writer J. W. Rinzler and Mike Mayhew.

As first drafted in 1974, “The Star Wars!” told the story of Jedi Annikin Starkiller and General Luke Skywalker, an alien named Han Solo and evil Sith Knights. Many had long speculated that the complete original version would never see the light of day, conflicting as it does with the saga’s mythic canon. But Allie said they found a powerful ally in Rinzler.

“We ran some samples by him in order to show proof of concept, and now here we are,” Allie said. “We’ve had a great relationship with Lucasfilm for a long time — but it will be a huge event in a year that’s already seeing some huge successes for us. This is ramping up to be the best ‘Star Wars’ year we’ve ever had.”

To underscore the point, the company’s newest “Star Wars” title, written by Brian Wood and set in the time period of the original trilogy, just sold out its third printing.

In a recent interview with Hero Complex, Allie, who took over as editor in chief in October of last year after 18 years with the company, provided a broad view of the current crop of books on the Dark Horse horizon — among the big names in the outfit’s stable of talent? Joss Whedon, Gerard Way and Guillermo del Toro.
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Re: MARVELMAN

Postby TheButcher on Wed Apr 10, 2013 2:56 am

TheButcher wrote:From Newsarama June 3rd, 2011:
Brevoort: Marvelman Is Still Coming, Honest

Axel Alonso Says MARVELMAN Announcement Coming Soon
Albert Ching wrote:Newsarama: Axel, not sure how much you can speak to this right now, but given the recent Angela news, fans are naturally wondering about another character in a seemingly similar situation, Marvelman — is there any progress involving that character?

Axel Alonso:
There has been progress. Considerable progress. And we'll be making an announcement soon.

I'm a huge fan of Marvelman. I'm very excited about seeing him being published by Marvel.


Who Actually Owns What With MARVELMAN, Anyway?
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Re: The Star Wars

Postby TheButcher on Wed Apr 10, 2013 11:54 pm

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Re: The Star Wars

Postby so sorry on Thu Apr 11, 2013 8:52 am




That's a pretty neat idea in an alternate universe kinda way. But ultimately it will probably fall into the trap of trying too hard to add in characters from the "real" Star Wars universe, just to keep SW intererst high. He's working from an early Lucas draft, so it can't possibly have enough characters and story lines etc.
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby Fievel on Thu Apr 11, 2013 10:20 am

so sorry wrote:That's a pretty neat idea in an alternate universe kinda way. But ultimately it will probably fall into the trap of trying too hard to add in characters from the "real" Star Wars universe, just to keep SW intererst high. He's working from an early Lucas draft, so it can't possibly have enough characters and story lines etc.


It's only 8 issues and only following the original film's script, so I think they'll be okay. I'm super stoked to see the McQuarrie art in "action" on these pages!
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby so sorry on Thu Apr 11, 2013 10:32 am

Fievel wrote:
so sorry wrote:That's a pretty neat idea in an alternate universe kinda way. But ultimately it will probably fall into the trap of trying too hard to add in characters from the "real" Star Wars universe, just to keep SW intererst high. He's working from an early Lucas draft, so it can't possibly have enough characters and story lines etc.


It's only 8 issues and only following the original film's script, so I think they'll be okay. I'm super stoked to see the McQuarrie art in "action" on these pages!


Its only 8 issues until it becomes a successful run, then they want to turn it into 16 issues, etc etc.!
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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby Lord Voldemoo on Thu Apr 11, 2013 11:49 am

so sorry wrote:
Fievel wrote:
so sorry wrote:That's a pretty neat idea in an alternate universe kinda way. But ultimately it will probably fall into the trap of trying too hard to add in characters from the "real" Star Wars universe, just to keep SW intererst high. He's working from an early Lucas draft, so it can't possibly have enough characters and story lines etc.


It's only 8 issues and only following the original film's script, so I think they'll be okay. I'm super stoked to see the McQuarrie art in "action" on these pages!


Its only 8 issues until it becomes a successful run, then they want to turn it into 16 issues, etc etc.!


I find your lack of faith disturbing....but probably warranted. Still, even if it twists into something else down the road, the initial run should be pretty neat. I'm excited for this. As Fievel notes, I too have always been intrigued by the McQuarrie art and the little glimpses it gives us into the Star Wars that might have been. This sounds like fun.
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Re: MARVELMAN

Postby TheButcher on Fri May 10, 2013 4:47 pm

On Keeping Your Mouth Shut and Wishing You’d Done That Earlier

Graeme McMillan wrote:When asked, over at CBR, whether fans can expect Marvelman to appear anytime soon, CCO of Marvel Entertainment Joe Quesada had this to say:

No. We’re still not prepared to talk about it. We’ve been very patient and very deliberate on how we talk about Marvelman. The internet leaks aside and the stuff that may be out there which you’ve read and isn’t true, we’re very careful with this. We don’t want to talk about this before its time — especially with something as great as Marvelman.


“We don’t want to talk about this before its time.” That’s a great idea, and one that the Joe Quesada of 2009 should have considered before telling the world that Marvel had bought the character, with Marvel telling fans to “stay tuned” for more news. It’s not as if fans started wondering, out of nowhere, whether Marvel would do something about the character; they were told four years ago that it was happening. Hell, as recently as last month, current EiC Axel Alonso was promising “an announcement soon.”

I get that it’s got to be frustrating to be continually asked about a project that is, quite clearly, taking longer to sort out than expected – but saying that the company doesn’t want to talk about it before its time, or that the company has been quite deliberate on how to talk about it rings somewhat false. After all, if that were really the case, why was it announced four years ago, and followed by a short-lived reprint series of the material that nobody really wanted, leading to everyone wanting to know when the good stuff would finally be available?
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Re: The Star Wars

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jun 13, 2013 3:06 am

A Galaxy Far Away 4: Adapting THE STAR WARS
Chris Arrant wrote:Newsarama: The ideas for what became the original Star Wars movie went through numerous, numerous drafts. How’d you nail down which one to do, and what does that draft actually look like?

Jonathan Rinzler: I don’t know if you saw the book The Making of Star Wars, which was my attempt at going through all of the various scripts which led up to the Star Wars film. George wrote them all and the story kept evolving. Sothe choice was simple — the draft we’re working from is the rough draft; the very first script he wrote.

As for what it looks like, it looks like a script; although clearly a rough draft. Reading it, you can see George trying out ideas and concepts that haven’t yet been finalized. That said, it’s highly readable and very exciting and different from Star Wars’ final shooting script.

Nrama: People know the over-arching story of Star Wars, but what about this divergent story — The Star Wars?

Rinzler: I don’t want to give away the whole eight issue comic story, but a lot of the elements from the original trilogy are mixed up in there like a kaleidoscope. There is an Empire and there is an Emperor, but you only see him a little bit. There’s an evil governor character like Grand Moff Tarkin, and there is a Luke Skywalker but he’s not a farm boy; he’s an experienced Jedi general.

Much like in the Star Wars movies, the Jedi are all but extinct, though there are at least two of them in this script. The Sith in this story have been actively hunting down the Jedi, who consequently are fading into legend at this point. In The Star Wars, there’s one Sith lord who, when he hears there’s a Jedi running around, comes to the Empire almost like a bounty hunter; he doesn’t work for them, but he wants to go after the Jedi. The Sith Lord comes to the Empire stating this is what they do — hunt Jedi.

There’s also a Princess Leia in The Star Wars, but she’s not Luke’s twin… but she has two brothers. There’s also a guy that’s half-man, half machine…. But it’s not Darth Vader. There is a Darth Vader, but here he is a general and not a Sith. There is a Han Solo and he does have an affinity with Wookiees, but he doesn’t have his own ship and he’s not even human. And so on and so forth.

There is an R2-D2 and a C-3PO, but unlike what people expect — this R2 actually talks, so prepare yourself for a shock.

Nrama: Are they called R2D2 and C3PO? I remember something about their names not being finalized until the filming of Star Wars.

Rinzler: They go by those names, but they’re spelled slightly different. And these earlier renditions of the characters are more clearly modeled on the two bickering peasants from Akira Kurosawa’s film Hidden Fortress.

And for the locations, there are shades and variations of what would become Tatooine and other worlds, but in The Star Wars they’re still evolving into what they finally become. The Death Star is here, but it’s called a Space Fortress — a tribute to Hidden Fortress, the Kurosawa film that influenced George.

Overall, this script — and this adaptation — is a very fascinating look at George Lucas’ first take on the Star Wars story.

Nrama: With that in mind, fans can’t take anything for granted that the way things were in Star Wars is the way things will be in The Star Wars. What’s the universe like as the series begins?

Rinzler: In this one, it’s a little different. Whereas in Star Wars: A New Hope the Empire had been ruling for a while and the rebellion was already somewhat established, in The Star Wars it shows a younger Empire. The Empire exists, but they haven’t taken over everything like they had at this point in the movies. As the series opens, they’re launching an attack on the planet Aquilae because it has a lot of technology that the Empire wants. And so what happens is that their attack instigates a rebellion on the planet. Even by the end of the story it’s not clear if the rebellion is going to spread across the galaxy; it’s set up as a cliffhanger even though The Star Wars is a complete story on its own.

Even from the beginning, George had always intended, one way or another, to have sequels.

Nrama: So with holding that original rough draft of Star Wars you have the story down, but what about the looks? Comics are of course a visual medium — for determining how something or someone looks, did Lucas have much notes on that in the original draft? And where else did you pull ideas for how to instruct them to be drawn?

Rinzler: The process goes differently for each character.

There were actually maquettes and models made based on George’s second draft of Star Wars that include several of the characters here. There’s a character that could be General Luke Skywalker in the early Ralph McQuarrie illustrations that looks like George Lucas himself.

What Mike Mayhew, Randy Stradley and I did was pore over the different designs and go back-and-forth with each other on what would work for each character. I know a lot of the artwork pretty well from doing the Making Of books, and I could point to certain things, like an off-hand McQuarrie sketch, and say it might work for such and such.

And in some cases you fill in the blanks. In the rough draft there was a huge studly character that only appeared in one scene. It was a Jabba-type character, but never identified by that name. What we did is pick an early concept of Jabba that Ralph did that was never used. We also found these great early versions of the Sith that we’re using in The Star Wars.

But even with all these resources, there are some characters and some vehicles we had nothing to go with. Dark Horse had some designers who have been just taking vehicles and creating them from scratch.


For the Space Fortress, there’s this early design for the Death Star that Colin Cantwell did which was all in silver that was great to re-purpose. And then there’s things like the Millennium Falcon, which was originally looked like the Blockade Runner — which makes a cameo in The Star Wars. We’re really having a lot of fun piecing it together.

Newsarama: Some of the names in The Star Wars are the same as what would come in the movie like Luke Skywalker, but as you said they end up being very different characters. Can you point out who’ll be the most shockingly different from how they’re portrayed in the movies?

Rinzler: I’d imagine it’s Han Solo, because he’s a giant green alien. I just finished writing the issue adaptation in which he appears for the first time. The Jedi are still human beings, and the Sith are still human. The Sith do wear ceremonial masks; not a mask like the one Darth Vader uses to breathe, but more decorative.

After Han, I’d say Darth Vader is the most different, because he’s not a Sith, and he’s not a man/machine…. He’s a villainous general.

But the key motivations for characters are still there in some form or another. You have to remember, when George wrote the rough draftit was very much a ‘blue sky’ endeavor; there was no way any studio would ever have had enough money to turn this rough draft into a live-action movie.

Newsarama: Jonathan, you’re best known as the Lucasfilm person heading up their various non-fiction books like The Making Of books you mentioned. You’ve done some fiction writing for Lucasfilm before, but never quite on this scale. Can you tell us about getting here?

Rinzler: I previously wrote an Indiana Jones novel for young adults, which came out in 2009, and I also wrote several of the stories that writers expanded into subsequent novels for Scholastic. I also wrote and directed an animated short called Riddle of the Black Cat not affiliated with Lucasfilm.

But as for The Star Wars, I’m not writing this; this is George’s story; I’m simply the one adapting it.

Nrama: But how did this project come about? This story’s been sitting in the Lucasfilm archives for over thirty years. And furthermore, why as a comic and not — I don’t know — an animated series, a novel or in some other format?

Rinzler: It came about pretty organically.

I don’t think we’d do this as an animated show, as we’d want that to be canon. The Star Wars isn’t canon; it’s a variation of the original story. As for why we chose the comic book format, after reading the original script you could see how George was very inspired by comic books. At that time, George was inspired by things like Hidden Fortress and a fair amount of Flash Gordon comics, so doing The Star Wars as a comic seemed like the natural way of doing it.

When I was working on the Abrams book, Star Wars Art: Comics, I got the chance to talk with George about comics. He told me several times about how much he loved comics that told the story visually, where you didn’t necessarily have to read word balloons. I know he likes his movies to carry the story visually, as well.

Nrama: And I know for a time that George co-owned a comic shop in the late 70s, which shows just how deep his comic fan roots run.

Rinzler: Right. I found out that Dark Horse was thinking along the same lines as me, so we got together and had an artist illustrate a few scenes from the Star Wars rough draft, with no word balloons, to show George. We got it together, showed it to George and he signed off on it. It actually took several years to get this together, depending on how you count it; I mentioned this to George verbally, and at first he was dubious to say the least.

Nrama: You’ve worked hand-in-hand with George Lucas — what’s it like taking something obviously so personal like this rough draft and adapting it? I don’t know how accessible George is, but do you have him on speed-dial to answer any questions you have?

Rinzler: Actually, I do have George on speed-dial. [Laughs.]

Right now of course he’s a tad busy getting married, but in general I can call him up and ask him a question if it’s urgent enough. He’s been shown the first issue and he is okay with us going forward on this adaptation. There have been times where I might run across something that doesn’t quite make sense, but we’re able to insert a line of dialogue here or there to cover it. For instance there might be a scene where a character that hasn’t seen his father in a while is in a room alone with him with no dialogue. I’d insert something along the lines of “Hey dad, how are you doing?” to acknowledge their mutual existence, but then we just want to move the plot along.

But everything is pretty laid out in this original script. There’s so much stuff in this between characters, vehicles, planets and situations to work with. I think fans are going to really enjoy it — hey, it is, in a sense, a brand new Star Wars story from its creator, featuring all of the original characters!
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Re: MARVELMAN

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 19, 2013 10:49 pm

SDCC: Marvel Comics Teases Marvelman During Retailer Lunch
A slide featuring the Marvelman icon with the words "We have not forgotten."
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Re: The Star Wars

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Re: The Star Wars

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:15 pm

Gustav Holst - The Planets - Mars, the Bringer of War
The Star Wars Book Trailer Dark Horse Comics
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Re: Shmuggy & Bimbo

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

Postby TheButcher on Tue Aug 13, 2013 5:12 pm

From BC:
Joshua Dysart’s Godzilla That Wasn’t
This is the rejected Godzilla pitch that let Joshia Dysart write Harbinger…
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Re: Darwyn Cooke's PARKER

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Re: MARVELMAN

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Re: Comic Book News & Previews

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Re: Paul Pope's Battling Boy

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Re: Stephen Hawking

Postby TheButcher on Thu Nov 14, 2013 9:24 pm

Stephen Hawking to Get Graphic Novel Biography in 2016
New comic book biography came about as a result of Hawking's enjoyment of creators' work on an earlier graphic novel about Richard Feynman.
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