The Official Grant Morrison Thread

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Re: The Multiversity--- Pax Americana

Postby TheButcher on Wed Apr 06, 2011 1:58 am

CBR @ WC11::
Frank Quitely Spotlight
The next fan asked when to expect "Multiversity," the mammoth project being written by Morrison.

"I've not started on it yet," Quitely said. "I'm halfway through the ten extra "We3" pages, so I'm guessing -- I'm hoping -- by, like, from a month from now, I'll hopefully have some 'Multiversity' script. I really know very, very little about it. I know it's the Charlton characters, the book I'm doing. I don't know how many other books there are or what other groups of characters they've covering but Grant's told me that I'll have script by the time I finish the 'We3' stuff, so that is the next thing I'll be starting on, so it shouldn't be too long.

Ganem prompted Quitely to relate what Morrison had told him about the project. "He did also say it's going to take me forever to draw, because he's made it super complicated," Quitely answered to chuckles from the crowd.
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Re: The Official Frank Quitely Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Apr 08, 2011 2:57 pm

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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 6:45 pm

From CA:
Parting Shot: Batman Punching Schoolgirls
Batman knocks out a schoolgirl assassin on the cover of Batman Inc. #9 by Chris Burnham.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 25, 2011 11:01 pm

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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:22 pm

Batman's Argentinean adventure concludes with Batwoman, Gaucho and The Hood.
Here's a preview: DC Preview: BATMAN INCORPORATED #5
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Re: Dinosaurs Vs. Aliens

Postby TheButcher on Wed May 11, 2011 11:02 pm

From CBR:
Morrison & Sonnenfeld Team On "Dinosaurs Vs. Aliens"
Acclaimed comics scribe Grant Morrison will prep a graphic novel and film script called "Dominion: Dinosaurs Versus Aliens" for "Men In Black" director Barry Sonnenfeld and Liquid Comics.


DEADLINE EXCLUSIVE:
How Would Aliens Fare Against Dinosaurs? Barry Sonnenfeld Aims To Find Out
MIKE FLEMING wrote:Barry Sonnenfeld, finishing up his third Men in Black film, has come up with a new spin on the alien film genre. Sonnenfeld is at the center of a publishing/movie deal with Liquid Comics and producer Arnold Rifkin and his Cheyenne Enterprises. Sonnenfeld will team with comic book writer Grant Morrison to develop a graphic novel and movie under the title: Dominion: Dinosaurs Versus Aliens. Morrison, whose comic book work includes Batman and The Invisibles, will write both the graphic novel and the script. Sonnenfeld will direct the film.

While Sonnenfeld has scored his biggest commercial successes with aliens, he's also a dinosaur fanatic who sparked to the idea of combining them. "Growing up, my fascination was all things dinosaur, and as an adult, I've had some success making films about aliens, so this is a dream come true," said Sonnenfeld, who first met Liquid Comics founder Sharad Devarajan when he wrote a forward for one of Liquid's graphic novels. "We've been trying to do a project ever since."

The graphic novel will chronicle a secret prehistoric world war battle. When an alien invasion attacks Earth in the age of the dinosaurs, the planet's only hope is the giants that roam the planet with, it turns out, a lot more intelligence than previously realized. Sonnenfeld, Rifkin and Devarajan will produce, while Liquid cofounder Gotham Chopra will be executive producer. WME will package the film.

The graphic novel will be published later this year in print and digital formats.
Artwork will be done by Liquid's Mukesh Singh, who teamed with Morrison on 18 Days.
Morrison's repped by ICM.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 12, 2011 2:16 am

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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 28, 2011 6:45 pm

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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 01, 2011 2:08 am

From CBR:
Details Emerge On DC's Relaunch
A new title starring Superman written by Grant Morrison.
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Re: BATMAN, INC

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jun 07, 2011 3:00 am

New 'Batman Inc' #1 by Grant Morrison to Relaunch in 2012
Laura Hudson wrote:Fear not, Batman Inc. fans! Despite speculation that the Grant Morrison-scripted comic about turning Batman into a worldwide franchise was about to go the way of the dodo in September, DC has announced that the current series will continue through #10, and will relaunch with a new #1 comic in 2012 after a hiatus.

As Morrison told The Source:

Batman, Incorporated will continue through to Issue #10 and August's shocking season finale that changes the Batman status quo yet again. The series will take a brief hiatus while I work on a major new project to be announced shortly. Batman, Incorporated returns next year with me, Chris Burnham and Batman: Leviathan, the epic 12 part conclusion to my 6 year Batman saga. Don't miss it!

The very brief announcement offers no indication of what month we can expect the new series, although it will obviously not be part of DC's relaunch in September. Regardless, the news will doubtless come as a relief to many Morrison fans. *COUGH*daviduzumeri*COUGH*

Read More: http://www.comicsalliance.com/2011/06/0 ... z1OZTG04o0
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Re: Supergods: Our World in the Age of the Superhero

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 22, 2011 2:57 am

From The List (Issue 682):
Supergods - Grant Morrison interview
Grant Morrison describes his journey to become one of the world’s leading comics writers

As one of the world’s leading comics writers, with titles including All-Star Superman and Justice League to his name, Glasgow’s Grant Morrison was the perfect man to write a history of superheroes. But his book, Supergods, covers a lot more than the world of pen and ink. He explains how he first became hooked on comic heroes, and what the superhero means to the world post-9/11

When I was eight my mum, who was a big fan of science fiction in all its forms, took me to see 2001: A Space Odyssey three times in one month. It was a profound thing to see. The second time I was so freaked out by the Stargate sequence that I couldn’t watch. I made my teddy bear watch instead. Even as a kid I was totally into it. I didn’t mind that there were 20 minutes of apes at the start and guys just talking for an hour and half after that – it was just compelling. It’s up there with the Sistine Chapel as one of the greatest things humans have ever made.

In terms of the film’s influence, the cosmic dimension was what I took from it more than anything else – the idea that there is a state that can be reached and then surpassed that takes us into a much bigger and more encompassing, holistic view of the universe and of life and death. Having that rubbed in at such a young age haunted me. I found that same stuff in Jack Kirby’s work such as New Gods – a real sense of the ineffable and of things beyond the veil. That point of being on the edge of comprehension fascinated me even then. Now I try to embody that in my characters and situations.

My mother was also a fan of comics, though it was my granddad, who was a riveter on the Clyde, who first brought them into the family. My first exposure to the superhero idea was when I saw a Marvelman comic, aged about three. I read comics like every other kid read them; they were really cool but at that age everything is: a flower on a stick or a caterpillar is cool. It was only when I became the classic withdrawn teenager that comics became an absolute obsession.

I loved the old Flash comics, which were very trippy with these bizarre far-out stories. They also really influenced me as a kid. Flash looked the best and represented a lot of cool stuff: lightning bolts and speed and energy and coffee. He seemed like the true hero of modernity. A lot of the superheroes, like Flash, don’t even need a great backstory. If you look back to the early Zorro film, which influenced Batman, Zorro just turns up and starts kicking ass. There’s no indication why he became Zorro or why he chose to dress like that. The modern approach to comic superheroes only came in later, when adults started to ask dumb questions like, ‘Why would he do that? How could he afford to do that?’ These are really stupid questions to ask of fantasy, but people did ask them, and then try to answer them. A superhero doesn’t really need a major motivation, though the best ones tend to have something big going on: Batman’s parents or Superman losing an entire planet so he has to protect this one. And a superhero needs to have a good silhouette; they need to be distinguishable.

After World War II, the popular comics were about crime, war, romance and horror. Superheroes vanished because they had been created for one purpose, which was to serve as heroes during the depression. They’d look after the poor and protect the weak. During the war they became patriotic, but after that they had no reason to exist. We’d just fought a war without superheroes and they suddenly started to look a bit ridiculous. Superheroes didn’t really become popular again until the late 50s, when there was a resurgence of the pioneer spirit. America started looking forward again, with Kennedy and the space race. Superheroes had the ‘right stuff’. They slotted quite nicely into this new optimism.

More recently, there’s been an onslaught of superheroes, starting with the first X-Men movie in 2000. This stuff that was once kept behind closed doors, and seen as the preserve of collectors or hobbyists, now belongs to everyone. What interests me is the way that the superhero is trying to claw its way into reality. There are now people who dress up like superheroes and try to fight crime. As an idea, the superhero seems to be getting stronger and more persistent. It almost demands that we connect with it.
The only way to make things in comic books real is to make comic books about real things. That’s not to have Superman sitting on the toilet or Batman filling out his tax form, but dealing with the feelings we all have. The stories now have to be about grief and loss and joy and hope and things that people feel – something meaningful and not just punch-ups.

The fears are what it’s all about. When I was doing Justice League, the writing was all about how you can marshal these forces of the human imagination against your depression, and against your fears for the world. It was very therapeutic for me. I feel better about life now, but I still use my characters to talk about the way I feel, and we feel, collectively. Moreso after 9/11, in that dark world that followed where kids were cutting themselves and the soldiers were dying.

Through this terrible sense of oppression – in which we’re being watched constantly, we’re stuck on the internet, and we’re scared of everything – the superhero has surged up as an imaginative response; a reminder that there is a future: stop telling kids that the planet is going to die and start using your minds the way that superheroes use their minds and get us out of this.

It’s a positive moment for superheroes, though not necessarily for the comics that they grew out of. They are seen as an old-fashioned way of selling the superhero story. It’s an interesting progression how the concept has evolved and developed its way from two dimensions, onto a moving screen, and then into real life. But for those who have shepherded these characters for decades, the vast number of movies is not necessarily a good thing.

The idea of doing Supergods was suggested to me. Originally we were going to put together a lot of the interviews I’d done over the years on the subject of superheroes and I thought, ‘That sounds really easy, no problem.’ I started it off in that way, and wrote an introduction. But when my agent saw it he said he really liked it, and why not just write something new?

It wasn’t what I’d intended doing, but obviously it’s something I’m passionate about. I just sat down and the whole thing came out without a lot of research. Most of my source material was available to me on the shelves a couple of feet away. I decided I wanted to just talk about the subject in the way that Nick Kent or Lester Bangs would talk about music. I felt that kind of approach would communicate with people who weren’t that into comics, but were familiar with the ideas because of movies.

The superheroes that endure, like Batman and Superman, are modern stand-ins for the old gods. Every culture has its own skyfather like Zeus, so we get Superman. And there’s always a god of the underworld like Hades or Pluto or the characters you get in Celtic culture or voodoo: Batman takes that role. Aquaman is the old Neptune and Flash is Mercury, the messenger of the gods. Those that persist are the ones who are simply those ideas in new clothes. They still mean so much to people and exist in symbolic dramas that teach us how to live.

(As told to Brian Donaldson)
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:03 am

From Newsarama:
Does This Make Shazam The Ultimate Superhero?
Graeme McMillan wrote:
The superheroes that endure, like Batman and Superman, are modern stand-ins for the old gods. Every culture has its own skyfather like Zeus, so we get Superman. And there’s always a god of the underworld like Hades or Pluto or the characters you get in Celtic culture or voodoo: Batman takes that role. Aquaman is the old Neptune and Flash is Mercury, the messenger of the gods. Those that persist are the ones who are simply those ideas in new clothes. They still mean so much to people and exist in symbolic dramas that teach us how to live.

There really is little as inspiring about the superhero genre these days as listening to Grant Morrison describe them, is there? The above is from an interview promoting Supergods, his upcoming prose book about superheroes and their importance in the world we live in, due out next month. I really can’t wait.
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Re: The Multiversity---Watchmen 2

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 29, 2011 3:31 am

ROBOT 6 Quote of the day | Grant Morrison on Watchmen 2
[Bobsy:] The bloke in my local comic shop was sure that [Morrison's upcoming DC miniseries] Multiversity was just a smokescreen and that you were going to be writing a sequel to Watchmen.

[Morrison:] Yeah?

Yeah.

No, they asked me to do that, and I said, “Why would you want a sequel to Watchmen?” [Laughs] No, I mean, c’mon. Watchmen is actually perfect in its construction. I mean, not necessarily in other areas, obviously, but as a story it’s complete, it’s utterly circular, and there’s absolutely no need for anything else in it.


–Superstar writer Grant Morrison on being pitched the much-rumored Watchmen sequel-writing gig by DC, in conversation with Bobsy and Gary Lactus of the Mindless Ones blog. The Mindless Ones’ interview with Morrison on the occasion of his (absolutely delightful) new prose book on superheroes Supergods is only available in audio form right now, but it’s well worth listening to while you wait for a full transcript to go up. Topics tackled include the status of Multiversity and Seaguy 3, Morrison’s contentious relationships with Mark Millar and Alan Moore, Lady Gaga as proto-superhuman, the superhero concept’s Lovecraftian attempt to extricate itself from fiction and implant itself in reality, and much more. If you’re interested in hearing three smart guys, including one of the biggest writers in the industry, talk about superheroes, then I know how you ought to spend the next hour.
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Grant Morrison vs Mark Millar

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 29, 2011 7:10 pm

Grant Morrison On The Mark Millar Question
Rich Johnston wrote:The Mindless Ones blog has just completed an interview with Grant Morrison, over his new book Supergods, beset a little by speaker interference and a roadside cherry picker. But through the white noise came some elucidation.

“The S is a serpent and there is a Curse Of Superman…”

“There’s something quite predatory about the superhero ideal”

Oh and there’s the Julius Schwartz version of Elton John comic book series he’s written, that he’s waiting until Elton dies so he can publish it without legal issues.

But there’s something we were bound to cherrypick ourselves, and it sounds like Grant expected it too. The matter of Grant and Mark Millar, which the boys bring up and, as Grant recognises, often grabs the headlines. The industry has been aware of issue between Mark and Grant, previously writing partners and close friends, which seemed to come to a head over the authorship of an issue of Authority, but seemed to have many personal aspects beneath that.

In an interview with Mark Millar last the year, The Daily Blam asked Millar about any issues with Grant Morrison as his documentary came out. He told them;
I haven’t seen the documentary, so I don’t really know, but I hung around for a long time with Grant in the 90s. I haven’t really seen him in about a decade or something – he lives between LA and somewhere north of Scotland. There’s no enmity or anything like that. I always enjoy his comics, Grant’s always been good fun. I really like his stuff – there are no hard feelings whatsoever.

In the Mindless Ones interview, Grant is asked (around 23 minutes in)
“It seems like a massive reversal of cosmic justice that you’re writing a memoir and Mark Millar appears to be able to just walk into any room and make a film any time he wants to. Do you feel like there’s still a tension between you there?”

And he replies;
“There’s a tension between us based on past history, but not… what you say isn’t necessarily true, I don’t want to say bad things about people like Mark and anyone but yes Kick Ass was made, Wanted was made, there are no other films any more made than say Joe The Barbarian and We3 which are all in the same state of production with directors attached, with screenplays…

WHollywood doesn’t work that way, you can’t walk in a room, and he doesn’t… you know I live in Hollywood, I live here four months of the year and I can know what goes on, there aren’t 200 million dollars films being made, what can I say… I don’t really want to say… I don’t want to come out against somebody who will see it as an attack, it’s all too easy to do.

WMark has to make a certain smoke screen of himself, to look a certain way you know. Look at sales of Ultimates Comics Ultimates Vs Ultimate Avengers… that’s what it’s all about right now…

“I wish him well but there’s not good feeling between myself and Mark for many reasons most of which are he destroyed my faith in human fucking nature.”

We don’t get any more details, and I don’t expect any are forthcoming, but it seems as if that enmity is still on. Supergods is published very very soon.
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Re: Grant Morrison vs Mark Millar

Postby Pacino86845 on Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:29 pm

TheButcher wrote:
Grant Morrison wrote:“I wish him well but there’s not good feeling between myself and Mark for many reasons most of which are he destroyed my faith in human fucking nature.”


Holy crappa, what's THAT about?! There's a "past" between Millar and Morrison? Is this summarized/explained somewhere, and is there dink-touching involved? I'd like to know more!
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby DennisMM on Thu Jun 30, 2011 10:27 pm

Morrison got Millar into the US comics biz, though Millar had some English credits beforehand. Morrison co-wrote the early issues of Millar's Swamp Thing so that Millar could get a foot in the door. He thought Millar owed him a bit of gratitude. And there is this, from a late-2002 report at CBR:

Indeed, during reports that Grant Morrison had been boasting to West Coast creators that he had written much of Mark Millar's work (vehemently denied by Millar), it emerged that Morrison had actually written most of Authority 28, while Millar was ill. Nevertheless, this spurred a feud between the two, who had been co-writers and friends for quite a considerable time. Millar barked his exasperation but was reprimanded by Alessi [his editor].



Apparently, Millar refused to give Morrison credit on the issue, despite Morrison's repeated kindnesses and request for a mention.

I would say, however, that the biggest issue is that Morrison, while a psychotic weirdo, is essentially a generous person secure in his own accomplishments. He promotes his work, but who doesn't? Millar, on the other hand, is a self-obsessed clown who thinks the entire comics industry is a means to create storyboards for his next movie project.

Lecko probably can fill in some information.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby Leckomaniac on Fri Jul 01, 2011 2:21 pm

That is about what I understood to be the point of contention. I have the Grant Morrison documentary and he mentions his "friend" who destroyed his faith in humanity many times. But he never goes into detail. I am assuming now that it is Millar.

I needn't mention that I absolutely cannot stand the man, correct?
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby DennisMM on Fri Jul 01, 2011 9:11 pm

In a recent online article, he spoke of the five movies he has in process.

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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jul 02, 2011 8:47 pm

SciFi Now Interview: Grant Morrison - Comic-book heavyweight talks DC reboot, Batman And Robin and Batman Inc
James Hoare wrote:Having freshly released his history of the Superhero genre, Supergods, Scottish comic-book creative powerhouse Grant Morrison is not only looking to the past, but taking a stake in its future, heading up Superman-fronted flagship title Action Comics in September and continuing his run on the irreverent Batman Inc in 2012. We catch up with the great man to talk about the future, and what we can take away from his sadly concluded run on Batman And Robin.

Did you feel as though you were swimming against the tide with your Batman And Robin series with Dick Grayson and Damian Wayne, and that Bruce Wayne would have to be the one and only Batman?

Absolutely, but the best you can do in comics that you can’t do in any other medium is at least run the idea through these different filters. There could be sixteen issues of Batman And Robin with a completely different Batman and Robin, and people are interested because they want different things, especially young people: they want to compare it to dad’s Batman and Robin and see which is better. Only dad’s version is also grandad’s version, and I think that’s the problem. You only have to look to Doctor Who, which I think is one of the best series, because you can change the actor and feel of the show every season, and that’s really clever – he never grows old he just changes and updates. I kinda wish we could do more of that, and it nearly did work with Dick Grayson and Damian in Batman And Robin, people really responded to that and I think we could have kept that running, but these things are like McDonalds recipes and have to always be restored to some kind of base level which is the trademark.

Is that frustrating?

I’m working with a universe of characters that have existed for a long time beyond me, so I’m just in there doing my bit. I’ve been lucky I’ve been able to do all of these things with Batman and that’s one of the great things about comics – that you have the freedom to do that. So I’m quite happy I’ve had my say on Batman and shown everything that it could be or it might be, tried all these different approaches and then leave it back in the hands of whoever wants to get Bruce Wayne driving around in the Batmobile as usual.

What kind of impact has the DC reboot had on your other Batman title, Batman Inc?

I’ve not had to majorly change it at all, Green Lantern and Batman are the most successful franchises at DC and they don’t want to mess too much with it. The idea of the relaunch is to jolt the stuff that isn’t doing quite as well as it might do or could maybe do with a bit of fresh meat. So it doesn’t impact much at all – there’s a couple of cosmetic changes that’re happening but as far as I’m concerned the story’s still the same story that I’ve been telling. It’s with the other stuff that I’m doing with Rags Morales [in Superman’s Action Comics] that the real change is quite considerable.

Are you able to tell us about your run on Action Comics yet?

You’re not allowed to talk about things; I’ve even signed bits of paper. So, no, I can’t actually say what I’m doing with Superman.

Is it fair to assume it’s going to be a radically different take on the character, in a similar way to Batman And Robin… or is that saying too much?

It probably is, what I’m trying to do is to solve some of the problems with Superman and make him appeal to a contemporary audience.

What do you think is the root of comic’s fascination with continuity cleaning? Why not just ignore the things that don’t work like Doctor Who?

It came about with the move from a mainstream newsstand audience towards a comic-book store audience, which is a much more partisan, fan audience. These guys wanted to see a consistent history and logic around this thing, where everything would tie in – you could read it for a long, long time and it would all be very consistent. Marvel have done quite a good job of it, because Marvel started out obviously with Stan Lee, Jack Kirby and Steve Diko – so basically three guys were responsible for the narrative of what became the Marvel universe, so it was very consistent. It was set in New York, characters did meet each other – it was all very co-ordinated. DC tried to do the same thing when it saw that that was a popular approach, but DC was a whole bunch of editorial offices that didn’t even speak to one another, had nothing to do with each other and didn’t really support one another in any way. So from the Sixties onwards they had a problem fitting all of it together, and then they bought a bunch of other comic companies like Fawcett with Captain Marvel and his characters, and the Quality characters like Doll Man and Uncle Sam. So DC’s problem was that DC was never a universe, it was this collection of different characters who would barely interact ever and even when they did interact there was no reference to the last time they interacted. DC’s problem was that in the Eighties they had to deal with that because they were trying to compete with Marvel’s more consistent universe, and every time they tried to fix it, it would lead to more problems. And then the same thing began happening to Marvel because of all the accumulated history, because not all of the younger Marvel writers had read every single Marvel comic so they might make mistakes. I made quite a few mistakes in X-Men that drove Chris Claremont mad – I wasn’t doing it on purpose. So with DC there was 70 years of history and with Marvel there was 40 years, and as they got further and further into selling to a fan audience, continuity became more arcane and it became about correspondency with score cards, with heights and weights and power levels, and all that weird World Wrestling Federation kind of stuff [laughs]. So the problem of the last ten years is how to reclaim a more mainstream audience, that’s why they keep re-designing the continuity with a big story where the entire universe is threatened so they can draw attention to it.

Does it feel a bit self-perpetuating, with a human centipede of world threatening events all backing into one another?

They need to find something new, because universes have been threatened as often as banks used to be robbed in the Fifties and Sixties. It was just assumed that if you were a supervillain you’d spend your entire time doing nothing but robbing banks. And now if you’re a supervillain you spend your entire life changing entire timelines and deleting histories and dividing universes, so yeah, it’s become a cliché. It’s become quite tedious and that’s the next paradigm shift we have to get out of. But these things sell, and it’s gotten to the point where’s there’s nothing but events, because as these things sell more and they’ll lean the product more towards it.

Do you think the reboot will break the cycle?

For me, what I’d like to see happen – and what’s always been my approach to it – is to go back to doing what we do best, which is the things that come from the imagination, that the producers will axe because it’s too crazy or two expensive to be filmed. There used to be format experiments on the page that you don’t really see anymore – now all panels are designed to look like widescreen cinema screens. It’d be nice to see stories a bit more contained, maybe shorter stories rather than arcs. People should be writing comics like TV seasons where you have individual episodes but they also have an over-arcing structure because it allows you to play the epic thing as well at the. We’ll see how people approach it, I don’t know – the opportunity’s there.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby Leckomaniac on Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:44 pm

My favorite voice in comics. I have similar hopes for the DCnU.

What is funny is that the thing he is going against (wide screen comics used as hollywood storyboards) is basically Mark Millar's whole approach. Just to bring that thread back into it. :wink:
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby Pacino86845 on Sun Jul 03, 2011 10:58 am

Thanks for the replies, dudes!
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Re: Grant Morrison vs Mark Millar

Postby TheButcher on Mon Jul 04, 2011 12:00 am

From Newsarama December 22, 2004:
Grant Morrison: Talking All-Star Superman, Newsarama

NRAMA: Speaking of the last time you worked with the character, during your JLA run – is this a different story now than it would have been had you written it then?

GM: It's very different. Comic books have changed and my ideas are constantly evolving and changing with the times. The best Superman idea I ever had, I gave to Mark Millar for the conclusion of Red Son, so I've been forced to try even harder to do something even better here.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby Pacino86845 on Mon Jul 04, 2011 9:05 am

HAHA, so basically Grant Morrison is responsible for making Red Son into a wicked-awesome book? LOLz, it is ON now!
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Re: Grant Morrison vs Mark Millar

Postby Ribbons on Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:38 am

TheButcher wrote:From Newsarama December 22, 2004:
Grant Morrison: Talking All-Star Superman, Newsarama

NRAMA: Speaking of the last time you worked with the character, during your JLA run – is this a different story now than it would have been had you written it then?

GM: It's very different. Comic books have changed and my ideas are constantly evolving and changing with the times. The best Superman idea I ever had, I gave to Mark Millar for the conclusion of Red Son, so I've been forced to try even harder to do something even better here.


Man, this is like Bill Hicks's feud with Dennis Leary
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jul 06, 2011 12:41 am

From Bleeding Cool:
When Grant Morrison And Frank Quitely Dropped Acid To See Robbie Williams – Bryan Talbot Expanded Digital Naked Artist
From Bleeding Cool:
“The Flash Is Cocaine Culture” – Grant Morrison At Foyles In London
Rich Johnston wrote:
Foyles of London is a grand old bookshop of much note, ostensibly for its heritage in providing a higgledy-piggledy browsing experience, with books stacked in any old order to encourage surprise and happenstance.

These days it looks far more professional, in that you can actually find what you’re looking for. And what I was looking for was on the third floor in a secluded and very full room. Where men of a certain beard had gathered to hear Grant Morrison launch his new book Supergods, a part memoir, part examination of the role of superheroes in modern culture, society and civilisation.

No photos were allowed, nor any kind of recording. Which leaves me with a few random notes and beer sodden thoughts. Let’s see how I do.

Grant told us how Supergods began as a collection of interviews he’d taken part in, then adding an introduction and then being persuaded to write a whole book out of new cloth.

He talked about how people relate to gods and create those they need to portray certain qualities, from the feeling of being sixteen, to love and rage – gods as qualities that we dip into, and how superheroes “developed in the darkness” which only “added to their power” now as culture finally takes a proper look at them. And gave us that headline quote about The Flash, before diving into the qualities of Captain Marvel and how both reflect Kabbalah teachings and symbols, if subconsciously, about lighting paths. Expect a lot of this in Supergods.

How continuity is like playing twelve bar blues, you can do pretty much anything but you stay within certain parameters, how “Superman is more real than we are”, “only in fiction do the dead come back, your mum is still dead, your dad is still dead, unless your dad is The Flash”, and how an alien abduction taught him that global warming is incubation.

As to writing superheroes, while he states that Watchmen is beautifully written, he objects to the theme or writing “realistic” superheroes, as the actions of a missionary rather than an anthropologist, pointing out what is wrong with them and infecting them with our issues, rather then accepting their rules and playing with them.

Oh and taking the topic of how superheroes go to the bathroom in their costumes, “Batman has never pissed ever, he has no bladder”… which seemed rather resonant with those who have read Kevin Smith’s Widening Gyre.

He talked in depth about the nature of reality, are we being written in the same way as characters we write? Do they have a life of their own just as we feel we do? And are we nothing but three dimensional illusions of a two dimensional brane reality, just like the comic book character?

Grant called his own take on Superman in Action Comics #1 as being the champion of the oppressed and hero of the working class, “the Bruce Springsteen of superheroes.”

He tells us his new Seaguy series is the best book he’s ever written, that superhero characters are more powerful that the companies who own them in that “even the owners die” and that soon everything will be open source anyway.

Oh and, I forget how we got onto this, looking at the progression of the telephone over the last century, “machines don’t want to fight is, they want to fuck us – and we want to fuck them!”

He also told us that he’s not a big comic book fan and that “I actually just like super hero stories – I’m interested in one particular aspect of it” although he recognises that, looking at how media is changing, with digital comics and more, “I think everything will be video games in ten, twenty years.”

I think that should do it.

Tomorrow Grant Morrison will appear at Orbital Comics in London to record a podcast before heading to Forbidden Planet for a signing for Supergods. So if you missed tonight, you do have another chance…
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby DennisMM on Wed Jul 06, 2011 1:25 am

Morrison is either on a continuous flashback or still taking waaaay too many psychedelics.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Jul 06, 2011 4:01 pm

TheButcher wrote:From Bleeding Cool:
When Grant Morrison And Frank Quitely Dropped Acid To See Robbie Williams – Bryan Talbot Expanded Digital Naked Artist
From Bleeding Cool:
“The Flash Is Cocaine Culture” – Grant Morrison At Foyles In London
Rich Johnston wrote:
Foyles of London is a grand old bookshop of much note, ostensibly for its heritage in providing a higgledy-piggledy browsing experience, with books stacked in any old order to encourage surprise and happenstance.

These days it looks far more professional, in that you can actually find what you’re looking for. And what I was looking for was on the third floor in a secluded and very full room. Where men of a certain beard had gathered to hear Grant Morrison launch his new book Supergods, a part memoir, part examination of the role of superheroes in modern culture, society and civilisation.

No photos were allowed, nor any kind of recording. Which leaves me with a few random notes and beer sodden thoughts. Let’s see how I do.

Grant told us how Supergods began as a collection of interviews he’d taken part in, then adding an introduction and then being persuaded to write a whole book out of new cloth.

He talked about how people relate to gods and create those they need to portray certain qualities, from the feeling of being sixteen, to love and rage – gods as qualities that we dip into, and how superheroes “developed in the darkness” which only “added to their power” now as culture finally takes a proper look at them. And gave us that headline quote about The Flash, before diving into the qualities of Captain Marvel and how both reflect Kabbalah teachings and symbols, if subconsciously, about lighting paths. Expect a lot of this in Supergods.

How continuity is like playing twelve bar blues, you can do pretty much anything but you stay within certain parameters, how “Superman is more real than we are”, “only in fiction do the dead come back, your mum is still dead, your dad is still dead, unless your dad is The Flash”, and how an alien abduction taught him that global warming is incubation.

As to writing superheroes, while he states that Watchmen is beautifully written, he objects to the theme or writing “realistic” superheroes, as the actions of a missionary rather than an anthropologist, pointing out what is wrong with them and infecting them with our issues, rather then accepting their rules and playing with them.

Oh and taking the topic of how superheroes go to the bathroom in their costumes, “Batman has never pissed ever, he has no bladder”… which seemed rather resonant with those who have read Kevin Smith’s Widening Gyre.

He talked in depth about the nature of reality, are we being written in the same way as characters we write? Do they have a life of their own just as we feel we do? And are we nothing but three dimensional illusions of a two dimensional brane reality, just like the comic book character?

Grant called his own take on Superman in Action Comics #1 as being the champion of the oppressed and hero of the working class, “the Bruce Springsteen of superheroes.”

He tells us his new Seaguy series is the best book he’s ever written, that superhero characters are more powerful that the companies who own them in that “even the owners die” and that soon everything will be open source anyway.

Oh and, I forget how we got onto this, looking at the progression of the telephone over the last century, “machines don’t want to fight is, they want to fuck us – and we want to fuck them!”

He also told us that he’s not a big comic book fan and that “I actually just like super hero stories – I’m interested in one particular aspect of it” although he recognises that, looking at how media is changing, with digital comics and more, “I think everything will be video games in ten, twenty years.”

I think that should do it.

Tomorrow Grant Morrison will appear at Orbital Comics in London to record a podcast before heading to Forbidden Planet for a signing for Supergods. So if you missed tonight, you do have another chance…


I can't wait to buy/read Supergods. I honestly can't get enough of Morrison. Wish I had been there.
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Re: Supergods, Action Comics And Multiversity

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 11:10 am

Grant Morrison Talks About Supergods, Action Comics And Multiversity
Rich Johnston wrote:From the Orbiting Pod podcast from Orbital Comics, who had Grant Morrison in before his Forbidden Planet interview on Wednesday. Naturally we recommend you listen to the whole interview, talking about his Supergods book, but here are a few headline grabbers…

He sees how Marvel superheros are like totemistic characters, full of animals and insects, how Iron Man represents the god of technology, or money and of industrial military complex.

How the readers of Batman Incorporated have also been recruited into the Batman Inc approach to heroism.

Of Action Comics #1, “Superman doesn’t stop moving all the way through so it’s really like as if the cameras on him for twenty pages and he never stops moving at any point… can you story where you don’t do cuts and you just follow this guy cos he’s constantly moving so fast and doing interesting things all the time. It completely changes the form.”

Of Multiversity, it wil be nine issues, seven set in different parallel worlds with two bookend issues. He describes “the Nazi one” opening with a constipated Hitler on the toilet reading Action Comics.

And how he’s writing it “taking all those Watchmen techniques and updating them and it’s not taking the story or anything but its the idea that no none in so many years has done a comic like Watchmen with that intense self relfective quality. So I kinda wanted to do that in a modern way with and try and develop new techniques to do it.”

Happy listening…
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Re: FLEX MENTALLO

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:25 pm

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Re: Marvel Boy

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:31 pm

Grant Morrison on "Marvel Boy"
"Not only am I working with one of the best comics artists ever, the colouring gauntlet has been thrown down once again with the most incredible video game lighting and atmospherics. The whole thing really becomes something new with issue 3, however, which I'm unusually proud of. Apart from the fact that the potentially impenetrable central idea (HEXUS, THE LIVING CORPORATION) wound up beautifully simple, original and ridiculous all at once, that was the issue I really began to utilise J.G. Jones' preposterous genius to its best effects and decided to rethink the prevailing vogue for cinematic/money shot panel structures and page layouts. Marvel Boy's visual style becomes more like MTV and adverts; from #3 on it's filled with all kinds of new techniques; rapid cuts, strobed lenticular panels, distressed layouts, 64 panel grids, whatever. We've only started to experiment but already MARVEL BOY looks like nothing else around. Some of the stuff J. G. is doing is like an update of the whole Steranko Pop Art approach to the comics page. Instead of Orson Welles, op art and spy movies, J.G.'s using digital editing effects, percussive rhythms, cutting the action closer and harder, illuminated by the frantic glow of the image-crazed hallucination of 21st century media culture and all that. Comics don't need to be like films. They don't need to look like storyboards. This is not to dis the many great comics which have used filmic narrative techniques but I wanted to go back and explore some of the possibilities of comics as music."

-Grant Morrison on "Marvel Boy"
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Re: Marvel Boy

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:34 pm

GraphiContent :
The Future Is X-Rated: Marvel Boy, The Modern World And The History Of The Marvel Universe
Chad Nevett wrote:Marvel Boy has been a bit of a forgotten treasure in Grant Morrison's career. It was his first major work for Marvel following his acclaimed work on JLA, but was quickly overshadowed by his run on New X-Men. That's not terribly surprising considering the book is filled with new characters, big ideas and is really only the first book in a trilogy of books that will most likely never be completed. Basically, despite the high profile creators, it just isn't what mainstream superhero audiences are looking for. Despite its lack of popularity, Marvel Boy is probably Morrison's most complex piece of work for Marvel and is, in a way, his defining statement on the Marvel universe as a whole and on modern superhero comics.

In this essay, I will outline various readings of Marvel Boy, including how the book can be seen as the history of the Marvel universe contained within six issues, how the book can be seen as the first "ultimate" book Marvel produced (although not as a part of what is now the official "ultimate" continuity obviously), how the book is a statement upon modern superhero comics, and how it is also a statement upon the modern world, specifically the modern corporate world. One aspect of Marvel Boy that I will not be looking at is what Morrison described as "a fairly blatant supersigil invocation/download of the incoming current of Horus, the newly arriving Lord of the Aeon" (Ellis 126). While this may be an aspect of Marvel Boy's subtext, it is beyond my understanding and I wouldn't know where to begin talking about it.

Marvel Boy as the history of the Marvel Universe

Even a casual reading of Marvel Boy shows an extensive amount of Marvel concepts taken by Morrison and altered in some way. The entire book is steeped in Marvel history and ideas, and the three primary actors (Noh-Varr, Midas and Exterminatrix or Oubliette) are no exception, with each representing one of the "ages" of Marvel's history (Noh-Varr being the only exception as he represents two "ages," but in a way that shows the cyclical nature of comics).

Noh-Varr is the representation of both the "golden age" and what I will call the "modern age" for lack of a better term. In initial comments on the series, co-editor Joe Quesada points to both the "golden age" and "modern age" aspects of the character: "The name is a tip of the hat to Bill Everett, who created the first Marvel Boy [during the 1940s], but it's Grant's attempt at finally creating an angst-ridden, Marvel hero for the next millennium . . . Grant's Marvel Boy is a guy who walks in the grey area between good and evil, sort of constructed on the Sub-Mariner principle" (Brick 42). The comparison to the Sub-Mariner is an easy one to make as both he and Noh-Varr are outsiders who essentially declare war on mankind. While the Sub-Mariner attempted to flood New York, Noh-Varr simply destroys the UN's headquarters and carves the words "FUCK YOU" into Manhattan and justifies it by saying, "Because it was the likes of you and this whole murky, hypocrite race who powderized my guiltless crewmates for no reason better than profit and ignorance" (Morrison "Boy" 18). As for his representation of the "modern age", I will explore that more in-depth later on.

Midas represents quite obviously the "silver age". It is key to point out here that Midas is a superhero, not a supervillain. While Noh-Varr is the protagonist of the story and Midas the antagonist, Noh-Varr is the alien invader, of sorts, and Midas is the superhero protecting Earth and the status quo. The most obvious tip-off that Midas represents the "silver age" is his costume: Iron Man's second armour (the first being nearly identical, but in grey rather than gold). Midas is dressed almost exactly like one of Marvel's most iconic superheroes, but with the addition of a leather jacket. His business is to kill aliens and he does that for profit, which is a play on the fact that Iron Man's began as Tony Stark, weapons profiteer. Also, if you look at Midas' allies in the story, you will find that they are all concepts or groups from the "silver age": SHIELD, the Bannermen (combinations of Captain America and the Hulk), the Mindless One, and even his attempt and success to become the Fantastic Four. Midas is most definitely a modernized superhero from the "silver age".

And finally, Exterminatrix represents the "bronze age". She is a woman who runs around in black leather and kills things for her father, sort of a modern Punisher. She is also not quite accepted by her father in the same way that heroes from that time period weren't quite accepted by the heroes of the "silver age". She acts as the bridge between the "silver age" and the "modern age". Ultimately, she sides with Noh-Varr as one would expect.

Each character represents a particular time period in the Marvel universe's history and its progression: Noh-Varr to Midas to Exterminatrix to Noh-Varr again. While not a complete history by any means, the book gives the basic structure for it.

Marvel Boy as the first "ultimate" book

"Grant asked himself, 'If Stan [Lee] was the age he was when he created Spider-Man today, what would have he created?'" Quesada said of how Morrison went about creating Marvel Boy, and I contend that Noh-Varr is "ultimate Spider-Man." The basic similarities in the characters support this: both are orphans with only one figure of moral guidance left (Plex for Noh-Varr and Aunt May for Spider-Man); both are basically teenagers, both had their first great love killed by their nemesis (Merree killed by Midas and Gwen Stacy killed by the Green Goblin); both end up with redheads (Oubliette and Mary Jane Watson); both have similar powers (cockroach-spliced genes for Noh-Varr and bitten by a radioactive spider for Spider-Man); and even their costumes follow a similar design, but with opposite colours (green, yellow and white for Noh-Varr compared to red, blue and black for Spider-Man) and a lack of mask for Noh-Varr (notice that their hair are also opposite colours).

The two begin with similarities, but it is their differences that we see how Noh-Varr is the more "realistic" "ultimate" version. What is more likely behaviour of an angry, newly-orphaned teenager with superpowers: that he would dress up and stop bank robbers, or that he would blow up buildings and carve swear words into cities? Noh-Varr is a representation of the true teenage mindset of the time, which is what Marvel's "ultimate" titles soon became about: modern versions of old characters. Noh-Varr is exactly how Peter Parker would have acted in modern times: he'd blow shit up and try to change the world so that it fit with how he thought it should be.

Almost all of the other pre-existing concepts from the Marvel universe that Morrison uses are updated to be more "ultimate". Midas is a good example of this, as he basically is a modern version of Tony Stark (minus the suave playboy side of the character), focussing on his evil corporate side (sort of like how Stark would have acted if he hadn't come so close to death and had a change of heart (no pun intended)). The idea of supersoldiers who are essentially mindless and programmed with a set of UN directives is how a Captain America-styled project would be done. SHIELD also is more modern with its orbital platform and caters to business interests in an almost overt way (a cynical comment, of course). Plex is also an "ultimate" version of the Supreme Intelligence, while at the same time functioning as "ultimate" Aunt May.

The only main character that isn't an "ultimate" version of anything is Exterminatrix really. While she can be seen to be an "ultimate" Mary Jane, that is a minor characteristic best used just for comparisons between Noh-Varr and Peter Parker. Beyond that, she has no real "ultimate" role. That doesn't prevent the reader from looking at Marvel Boy from this perspective, it merely suggests that Morrison did not strictly adhere to the idea of modernizing concepts in that way (although, as said earlier, Exterminatrix is a modern "anti-hero" of sorts, just not one in particular).

Marvel Boy as a statement on modern superhero comics

This is a tricky area to deal with as the biggest definer of the modern superhero comic was Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch's The Authority, which was only a year or so old at that point, so it's difficult to tell exactly how much it may or may not have influenced Morrison. Let alone the fact that Morrison's JLA was also a large influence upon the style and tone of the modern superhero comic. For those reasons, I will ignore those external influences and just look for aspects of the modern superhero comic in Marvel Boy as I see them.

Noh-Varr, as I said earlier, represents the "modern age" of superhero comics, which I think is just a cyclical rebirth of the "golden age". The extreme methods and "walking in the grey" are both characteristics of both "ages". By far the most modern thing about Noh-Varr is his desire to actively change the world. This has been an aspect lacking in all of the previous "ages," even the "golden age." The idea of a superhero--as while I called Noh-Varr a villain that was meant within the confines of traditional superhero/supervillain definitions, not within the more modern meanings of the term where the boundaries are less clear and seem to depend on whether or not the character is a protagonist--playing the role of supervillain in his methods and goals is a relatively new one. Noh-Varr has good cause to believe himself superior to humanity and decides to impose his views upon it. This aspect of the modern superhero would be seen later in The Authority when they took over the United States.

To accomplish this goal, though, Noh-Varr had to displace the old order, which meant he had to defeat Midas. He does this primarily by "corrupting" his daughter through his sexuality. The overtly sexual superhero is another characteristic of the "modern age" and this can be seen in issues four through six of Marvel Boy as almost every comment Midas makes in relation to the two is of sexual nature, and Noh-Varr uses this to taunt Midas: "She loved it," he says weakly as Midas is beating him in issue four and also "I took your daughter" in issue six. Through sexuality is how Oubliette chooses to relate to Noh-Varr. He appeals to her because of the oppressive nature of his father as the idea of sexuality had been repressed greatly in previous ages. While it was never entirely absent, it was also only permitted to a certain point.

The rejection of the old ways by Oubliette is best seen in his casting off of her mask, which Midas describes as "her face" (Morrison "Zero" 19). The mask being a large part of the old ways of superhero comics, and by her rejecting it, she sides with the modern superhero. This effect could later be seen at Marvel in various titles as their heroes one after another had their identities revealed to some extent or another. The concept of a secret identity and separating one's self into two is no longer seen as realistic. The modern hero has no need for masks.

Another indication of Noh-Varr, and later Oubliette, representing the concept of the modern hero overcoming the old ways is in their fight against the Mindless One, which is literally being killed by the future (Morrison "Mindless" 5). The creature is used to a slower, older environment and can't compete with Noh-Varr and Oubliette who can handle the faster, more modern world.

Hexus, The Living Corporation, the "villain" of issue three is the representative of the modern supervillain in that in the "modern age," conflicts are not just a matter of simply physical confrontations, but of ideological confrontations. Noh-Varr cannot beat Hexus just by blowing things up, he must use ideas to defeat it, because it is an idea itself. Hexus is also an especially capitalist idea, which tends to be the role of modern supervillains, in that they usually represent things like greed and oppression of people with what Marx called a "false consciousness." The hero is usually put in the role of the oppressive liberator, who dominates the populace in an effort to free them, or as the Kree philosophy is described in issue six: "Zen fascism" (Morrison "Mindless" 21).

Marvel Boy was both a follower and precursor of the modern superhero comic. It conforms to established ideas about the "modern age" while at the same time sets up a few others.

Marvel Boy as a statement upon the modern world

From what I can count, there are approximately nineteen corporate brands or products mentioned or shown throughout the six issues of Marvel Boy with the majority of them in the first three issues. I am hard-pressed to find another comic, even a modern one that has that many "product placements"; while the number isn't amazingly high--only an average of around three per issue--it is higher than nearly any other comic, and one must ask why that is. It obviously ties into the character of Hexus, who I've labelled as the representative of the modern supervillain, as Hexus is the Living Corporation. Hexus' methods involve taking over the corporate culture by creating an appealing brand. This means doing everything from cola to music, and the underlying message is clear: corporations control the modern culture. Now this may not be a big surprise to many, it is an idea foreign to most comics--especially a mainstream superhero one.

This idea is raised again at the end of the series where Exterminatrix begins her attack upon the modern culture on behalf of Noh-Varr by destroying Disney World. She doesn't attack political or military institutions, she attacks a beloved corporate, capitalist entity.

This hatred of the greed and capitalism is introduced right from the very beginning of the series where the entire conflict is brought about through the destroying of "The Marvel," Noh-Varr's ship because Midas wants to steal the technology and make a profit off of it. Let's not forget that Midas is also a representative of the corporate world, which highlights even stronger Oubliette's turning against her father. While she comes from a corporate culture, she prefers to rebel against it much like the youth today do. But much like the youth of today, Exterminatrix is also a hypocrite as when she declares war upon "the way that was," she re-dons her mask, this taking up the methods of her father. While the youth of today claim to despise their parents' culture, they often act in much the same way; they will claim to despise the inhumanity of the corporate world and then catch their breath by taking a drink out of a bottle of water that they paid four bucks for. Exterminatrix directly stands in for the youth who are trapped between a capitalist world and one of socialism, with Midas and Noh-Varr standing in for each.

Also, if you notice how Noh-Varr looks upon humanity, you'll see that he sees our culture as a virus, of sorts, and uses it against us. A piece of dialogue in issue two sums up this feeling best, as Plex says to Noh-Varr, "You spent a day in the ship's limbo suite learning their English for this? Noh-Varr, you know every word in their language."

Noh-Varr replies, "Too bad I have to stick to the simple ones they understand." Before attacking humanity, Noh-Varr takes an effort to learn about it and understand it. At the end of issue two, we see him return from his attack on New York to sit down and watch dozens of TV screens in an effort to learn more about humanity. He doesn't go to libraries or schools or even reads the paper to learn about humanity, he watches TV.

Also, in issue two, the "promotional video" for the United Nations Bannermen is done in such a way to show just how corrupted we are by the media. Instead of an informative report on the group, we are given lame voice-over and quick shots of action and meaningless posing. Our political systems no longer contain actual substance, they've been reduced to catch-phrases and Hollywood videos.

Conclusion

Marvel Boy is ultimately a book about the modern world, including the modern superhero comic. It is a book that while ahead of its time already seems dated because it was very much of its time. If Morrison went about trying to create this book now, it would look radically different--something that I don't think could be said about any of his other work for Marvel. It was his ultimate statement on the Marvel universe and his mission statement, in a way, for what he planned to do there. It can also be seen as the first "ultimate" book as Morrison literally tried to recreate what Stan Lee did in the early sixties, but for the twenty-first century--and I would suggest succeeded far greater than those who created the actual "ultimate" line of titles. He manages to capture the feeling of what it was like to be living in the year 2000, especially what it was like to be a teenager at the time. Sadly, it is not likely that we will see the sequels planned for it, but luckily, other creators--including Morrison himself--have carried on in the tradition of Marvel Boy--which is part of the reason why the comic seems so dated. Titles like Wildcats Version 3.0, Daredevil (under Brian Michael Bendis) and The Intimates seem to be direct descendents, in a way, of Marvel Boy and I believe it will be a lasting influence upon any other titles of the "modern age" however long that lasts.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:38 pm

grant morrison: flick the switch
by Jason Louv (jlouv@cats.ucsc.edu) - May 06, 2003


Editor's Note: Special Thanks to Jason Louv, Webmaster of King Mob, who taped this interview at the San Diego Comic Convention (22 July 2001), and then transcribed its 23 pages. Also check out our book Anarchy For The Masses.

Disinformation readers should be familiar with Grant Morrison--after all, Richard Metzger has called him "the rightful heir to William Burroughs," and he may be right. Morrison, on the other hand, is a lot more fun than Uncle Bill ever was. I've been reading his comics since the age of nine, when I picked up Arkham Asylum, his tale of Batman and psychoanalysis. I've stuck with him since that early trauma: his epic work The Invisibles, which boils down a century's worth of paranoia, magic, and cultural theory, was a point of obsession during my high school years.

Morrison attended the annual Comic Convention in San Diego (where I live) this year, promoting his current work on New X-Men and Fantastic Four: 1234 for Marvel Comics. Made a bit wobbly-kneed by the close proximity of my hero, I clutched my shiny green press badge and set about trying to arrange an interview with him after a panel discussion on the X-Men which he was a participant in, wearing a black T-shirt that read "Think Punk" and bore the outline of the Apple logo pierced with two dozen nails.

After the panel, Morrison stood outside with his lovely girlfriend Kristan and politely spoke to a minor herd of characters who kept telling Morrison he was "appearing in their dreams" and other such Lone Nut-isms. I hoped that my suit and tie would set me apart, but it didn't: Morrison was just as polite to me as he was to his other fans. Amazingly, he seemed interested and agreed to an interview on the last day of the convention.

The day came, and astoundingly, Grant had actually remembered me and showed up at the time we picked. The sheer graciousness of it had me floored for a few moments, until we decided to find somewhere to sit and spent about fifteen minutes combing the convention center for a seat; eventually we found a sunny spot outside overlooking the San Diego harbor and the Coronado Bay Bridge, where Grant told me in a soft-spoken Glaswegian accent that I could interview him "until his bald head started to burn."

It turned out that it only took an hour of conversation for his head to burn and my mind to blow.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:39 pm

Pop Will Shit Itself with Grant Morrison
Grant Morrison Is..., an interview by Jonathan Ellis.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:41 pm

Grant Morrison Interview, Part One
Jeffery Klaehn wrote:Click here to read the first part of my Publishers Weekly interview with with acclaimed comic book writer (Animal Man, The Invisibles, Doom Patrol, JLA, Fantastic Four 1234, Marvel Boy, The Filth, X-Men, We3, Seaguy, Batman, All-Star Superman, Seven Soldiers, Final Crisis) Grant Morrison.


Grant Morrison Interview, Part Two
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Re: Marvel Boy

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:43 pm

From Pop Matters:
Marvel Boy
Shannon D. Smith wrote:Comic books have seen dramatic changes since the Marvel Comics Group hit the scene in the ‘60s. We’ve seen the growth of the adult comic book audience as well as the amazing influx of international comics. What was once a cheap form of entertainment found mainly by young boys at newsstands and grocery stores is now a culture made up of devoted fans of all ages hidden away from society behind the walls of comic book specialty stores. So much has changed and yet Marvel remains the same. While Marvel’s biggest competitor, DC Comics, features an entire line of adult oriented comics, Vertigo, Marvel chooses not to. While smaller independent companies choose to challenge the reader, Marvel chooses the status quo. Marvel makes comics for adolescent boys. Marvel does not care if the comic buying world is made of young men and women who go in the comic shops, go to the conventions and talk in the online message boards. Marvel makes comics for kids, always has, always will.

While countless comic companies have come and gone over the past several decades, Marvel is still churning out campy super hero stories in the year 2000. Perhaps Marvel is right. Maybe comics are just for kids. If so, then why is one sequential art form like comics only for kids while other sequential art forms like films and television reach mass audiences? The answer is the stigmatism that goes with comics. People think of comics as silly stories featuring men in tights. How do you destroy the stigmatism? Not by sticking to silly superhero comics like Marvel has for the past four decades.

For years the standard structure of a Marvel comic book was four or five pages explaining the last few issues followed by ten or fifteen pages of the hero lamenting his past and trying to focus his determination to right all the wrongs of the world. The comic would conclude with an attack by and old foe that would be resolved later in the next issue or may not even be resolved until the follow up limited-edition-crossover-event-to-end-all-crossover events. Marvel’s new comic, Marvel Boy, hopes to break this format and maybe even break down the superhero stigmatism.

Marvel Boy is the newest star in the “Marvel Knights” wing of the Marvel Comics Group. Founded by Joe Quesada and Jimmy Palmioti, the “Marvel Knights” line has been home of some of the best super-hero comics of the past year, most notably the work of Kevin Smith (of Chasing Amy and Clerks fame) and David Mack on Daredevil. What makes the “Marvel Knights” line different from the rest of Marvel and the majority of superhero comics in general is that these books are not aimed only at kids but also at those freaky older people who actually buy comics. “Marvel Knights” aims to push the limits of the Marvel format as far as they can while still remaining safely within the comic’s code. In hopes of pushing the limits even further, Quesada and Palmioti have recruited the controversial writer Grant Morrison to pilot the Marvel Boy project.

Grant Morrison twisted the innocent minds of fanboys and fangirls all over the world with Animal Man and Doom Patrol then redefined the superhero genre with your old pals the Super Friends in JLA. More importantly though, he showed us just how powerful comics can be with The Invisibles. Morrison made comics cool again and now he aims to do what many feared was impossible, he wants to make Marvel Comics cool. Morrison has aimed this comic not at his dedicated adult fans or at the standard Marvel buying kids. Morrison has chosen to take the road less traveled and aim this comic at both audiences. Morrison throws the reader into the action the way Spielberg used to back when he was making the best action flicks in the world. He does not spoon feed the plot. He knows the audience is smart and able to catch up. Morrison likes to break the conventional rules of sequential art and jump around in the plot line often leaving readers a bit confused. Not here.

Marvel Boy has a nice flow and does not demand as much from the reader as his more mature work. Die-hard Grant Morrison fans may find Marvel Boy simple and light but there is nothing wrong with a little fun. While Marvel Boy is conservative compared to what Morrison fans are used to, it is still an intelligent read and much more hip and real than what Morrison gave them in JLA. Of course the Hollywood feel of this book is not going to suit everyone’s taste but at the very least, Marvel Boy is more cerebral than Morrison’s run on JLA. Many fans were terrified when it was announced that Morrison would write for Marvel but he manages to prove that good writing makes for good comics no matter who the publisher is.

Our hero in Marvel Boy is Noh-Varr. His is origins tie into the old Captain Marvel (not Shazam but the dude with the green helmet and all those fun times with the Skrulls and the Kree…but none of that is important). All you need to know is that our kid Noh-Varr saw his people destroyed by pesky Earthlings and now he plans to settle the score. He turns pain into music, spits nannomachine saliva that can telepathically control his enemies, walks up walls, carries enough firepower to blow away Manhattan, and lives in a ship powered by imagination.

Noh-Varr explodes off the page thanks to the art team anchored by J. G. Jones. Jones does a fantastic job of providing the widescreen theater feel comics fans have been seeing in Image and Wildstorm comics lately without sacrificing the plot. The look of the comic is ultra modern while at the same time pays a strong tribute to the character designs of Jack Kirby and the first few decades of Marvel Comics. Jones is not necessarily the most original artist you have ever seen but the pacing works very well and the intensity is consistent. By the time you get to the first full shot of the villain Midas in issue one, you really feel like you are in the middle of a classic Marvel cosmic adventure without having to be ten years old to bare it.

Could this be the comic to help push marvel into another decade of success? Perhaps Marvel Boy has enough style and intensity to attract new readers and enough of the Marvel superhero tradition to bridge the gap between the adults and the kids. Is Marvel Boy a glimpse of the future of Marvel Comics or just another over achievement for Grant Morrison? With a lot of luck (and strong sales) maybe Marvel Boy will wake Marvel Comics up and show it the new millennium. Either way, it should be a fun read.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:47 pm

Wednesday and Thursday Comic-Con Schedules are now up!

Thursday July 21st

12:45-1:45 DC Comics: Grant Morrison
Comic-Con special guest Grant Morrison, one of the most inventive writers in comics today, discusses his work in and out of comics, including the highly anticipated Action Comics #1, coming in September from DC Comics, his new nonfiction book, Supergods: What Masked Vigilantes, Miraculous Mutants, and a Sun God from Smallville Can Teach Us About Being Human, and recent acclaimed titles like Joe the Barbarian. Don’t miss this chance to hear one of comics’ most distinctive voices as he talks about his work from superheroes to the cutting edge of comics. Room 6DE


4:30-5:30 Spotlight on Cameron Stewart
Join Eisner-winning artist/writer and Comic-Con special guest Cameron Stewart (Batman & Robin, Assassin’s Creed: The Fall, Sin Titulo) for a one-on-one discussion of his past and future work with moderator Nathan Wilson and a demonstration of his all-digital drawing process, plus an audience Q&A. Room 4
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jul 09, 2011 1:34 pm

The Saturday schedule for Comic-Con is up.
10:00-11:00 From Buddha to Batman: Deepak Chopra and Grant Morrison Discuss The Seven Spiritual Laws of Superheroes
Five years ago, New York Times bestselling author and internationally renowned spiritual guru Deepak Chopra joined legendary comic book writer Grant Morrison (All-Star Superman, Supergods) at Comic-Con to discuss the role superheroes play in the social fabric. What started as a thought-provoking panel discussion has since become a profound new teaching manual for discovering the superhero within -- Chopra's new book, The Seven Spiritual Laws of Superheroes. Now Chopra and Morrison are back to elaborate on what the superhero archetype means for us today. Joined by Deepak's son Gotham Chopra (founder of Liquid Comics) and moderated by Chris Carle (editorial director of IGN Entertainment), the discussion will cover the seven essential laws that govern the realm of superheroes and the cultural importance of superheros -- why they matter, why they will always be with us, and what they tell us about who we are...and what we may yet become. Q&A to follow. Room 6A
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jul 19, 2011 1:21 am

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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jul 19, 2011 1:26 am

ComicBookGrrrl EXCLUSIVE:
Interview with Grant Morrison & Signed Supergods Giveaway

"Who wouldn't want to see people – young and old – marching out and proud in their superhero and manga dream-costumes, all friendly and upbeat, rather than hunched and screen-tanned in the dark spitting venom? Only a bastard, that's who."
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:47 pm

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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jul 21, 2011 3:47 am

Grant Morrison Just Plain Talks Comic Books
Our two-part interview with Grant Morrison on his new book Supergods, which hits bookstores this week, concludes today. We’re going to be blunt and say that this part is a free-flowing discussion of Morrison’s thoughts on recent trends in comics, some of his favorite all-time books, and what it’s like working on DC’s new relaunch. Also, why more comics need to be written by kids. Read on!
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jul 21, 2011 3:47 am

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Re: Grant Morrison's Multiversity

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jul 23, 2011 4:21 pm

Comic-Con: Multiversity Release Date?
Joey Esposito wrote:At Saturday's The New 52 Panel, discussion was led by a fan to discuss the New Gods. Grant Morrison told the fan that the New Gods were currently living on Earth 51, and that we'd see them in his long-awaited exploration of DC's multiverse, Multiversity.

Of course, we're still awaiting a solid release date. Morrison did have this to offer fans: "You'll see it next summer."

So there you have it, folks. Multiversity. Next summer. Prepare your brains.
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jul 26, 2011 7:58 pm

Grant Morrison, Gerard Way talk ‘Supergods’ in L.A.
Super friends and cosmic dreamers Grant Morrison and Gerard Way will appear together Thursday at Meltdown Comics (7522 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles) for a discussion of Morrison’s acclaimed new book “Supergods,” which is a sort of meditation on meta-humanity. The two are among the elite creators in comics these days with Morrison writing key Superman and Batman arcs in recent years and Way chronicling the surreal adventures of “The Umbrella Academy.” Way also has a day job as lead singer and art director of My Chemical Romance (the band is now preparing to tour with Blink-182) and Morrison portrayed a memorable bad-guy in their music video for the hit “Sing.” I’ll be there Thursday for sure. Hope to see you there as well. – Geoff Boucher
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jul 26, 2011 10:45 pm

Comic Book Heroes: A conversation between Neil Gaiman and Grant Morrison
Keith Staskiewicz wrote:Sometime in the late 1980s, the British invaded and changed comic books forever. Superman may stand for the American way — at least most of the time — but it took Scotsman Grant Morrison to write one of the best modern interpretations of the Man of Steel with All-Star Superman. Morrison’s latest work, Supergods, is an analysis of what superheroes, caped crusaders, and masked men can tell us about ourselves and our culture. It’s a fascinating discussion, and one that continued when he got together with fellow comic book icon and Sandman maestro Neil Gaiman to discuss their medium, their lives, and each other’s work in a wide-ranging conversation that EW was lucky enough to listen in on.

NEIL GAIMAN: First off, congratulations! You’ve got a book out.

GRANT MORRISON: Oh, thank you. It’s great after 30 years of actually taking it seriously to finally write it down.

NG: I’m in this wonderfully blank position on this one, because I haven’t actually seen the book. So instead of doing that thing where I say, “I really liked that thing and can you expand upon it?”, we’re now in the position, as we would be over dinner, when I say, “So you’ve got a book out! What’s it about?”

GM: It’s about us. It’s about all the things we went through as kids, with comic books and superheroes. Why have they taken over the world and why are they so ubiquitous on the buses and on the tube trains and such? I devised a theory. That thing that was started in 1938 has been growing and growing and colonizing more minds and is starting to come into our real lives. I kind of think that superhero movies tend to represent this Utopian ideal of humanity because we’ve run out of them. There is no space program here anymore. I’m sure in China people feel slightly different about this, but certainly here in the West, it’s almost a time of disaster and apocalypse. It’s kind of obvious that a superhero would arise in a time of disaster and apocalypse and stand with hands on hips to remind us that we’re all okay.

NG. I find myself peculiarly reminded of these strange stories that it seems everybody who’s written comics extensively has. Was it you that told me of the mysterious Superman pauper?

GM: He was a real person, but he played it all in the character of Superman.

NG. Alan Moore talked about running into John Constantine one time, and…

GM: What happened to you?

NG: I had a few of them. The one that always haunted me — you’d think that it’d have been Morpheus — but it’s always been Death.

GM: She fancies you, Neil, let’s face it.

NG: One of [the stories] was the point where I realized how absolutely sane, in the sense of “lives in the real world,” Dave McKean is.

GM: Oh, God, yes. Thank God.

NG: You wouldn’t think to look at Dave’s imagery. He was going to the San Diego Comic-Con and he got there late. He was coming over from the UK and his plane came in incredibly late. I asked what happened and a guy had died on the plane, and they had to land and get him taken away to a hospital. It was this whole big thing, a guy in the middle of a transatlantic flight just died. “But I could tell I was coming to Comic-Con,” Dave said, “because there was one of your fans on the plane.” I said, “Oh?” And he said, “Yeah, she was dressed as Death.” And I thought, you know, if it were me, I would have wondered, just for a moment, “What are we saying here?” Dave, of course, has that gloriously rational mind that never does that, whereas you and I are both slightly mad.

GM: Yeah, slightly. Only slightly.

NG: But I like to think that some of the great discoveries have been made by the slightly mad.

GM: Oh, definitely. And I think that slightly mad is just an interesting perspective, isn’t it? That the non-slightly mad don’t quite have, so I think it’s well worth having.

NG: If it wasn’t for being slightly mad, neither of us would do what we do, or be willing to take seriously the ideas that we take seriously and then watch as they wander out into the world.

GM: And then other people start to take them seriously, and then suddenly you’re living in it.

NG: Of course, you can’t really say this because you start to sound incredibly big-headed, but you wonder how much of the stuff that exists in terms of the cultural media landscape exists because you made it up, years ago.

GM: We both know there’s a lot of that. We’ve been working long enough that obviously people have been influenced and inspired, which is fantastic, because we, in turn, were inspired by others like us. It’s hard to avoid sometimes. You don’t want to be big-headed about it, but it’s undeniable.

NG: You can point to giant, obvious ones. The one that I saw most recently, which was neither of us but we can talk about him because he’s not on the phone call, is Alan [Moore]. The Egyptian demonstrators wearing V for Vendetta masks.

GM: Wasn’t that amazing? And that’s become the default face for anarchists. They all wear that now. Everyone wears that on anti-corporate demos, and on all kinds of marches and protests. I’m amazed that that thing has become the real version of what Alan set out to create.

NG: Although it’s kind of a candy version. But what I love about it particularly in Egypt was that it wasn’t a candy version. It actually did what it was meant to do. I think there’s a difference between wearing it on a corporate march just so that you can’t be spotted, and the idea that they brought down a government. They brought down a bad government! And they brought it down wearing Guy Fawkes masks.

GM: And hopefully playing torch songs on an old piano, as well.

NG: Singing “Old Gangsters Never Die.”

GM: The Superman guy that we met in San Diego was a real person, but it was very much in the mold of what I would describe as a shamanic encounter.

NG: I remember you telling me it was really late at night.

GM: It was half-past-one in the morning and I was sitting up with Dan Raspler, who was the JLA editor at the time, and we were talking about Superman, that whole idea of trying to revamp Superman in the year 2000 and deal with all the problems that had been created in the 1990s. Remember when all the imaginary stories became true stories and suddenly there was nowhere else to go? We were talking about how Superman couldn’t solve these problems and we went down into that little park that’s across from the convention hall, and as we look up there was a guy walking across the tracks with his friend, but this guy’s Superman. And he’s not just any costumed convention-goer, but he’s perfect. He was like Billy Zane-meets-Christopher Reeve and he really suited the costume. So I ran over him and said, “This is quite amazing, this is the perfect time for this to happen. Could you come over and speak with us?” He came right over and he started talking in the persona of Superman. So if I said to him, “How do you feel about Lois?” he’d say “Well, Lois doesn’t quite get that I’m an alien as well as a human.” He was so in the character, but what really got me was the way he was sitting. It was this absolutely relaxed pose with one knee up and the arm bent over, and that’s what broke Superman for me. Suddenly I realized that Superman wouldn’t be a poser, he wouldn’t be a Muscle Beach steroid guy; he’d actually be completely relaxed because nothing could hurt him. He could be so open and friendly to everyone because no one can punch him or hurt him. He can’t get a cold, or be damaged by anything you’re carrying or wearing. For me that was the power of that, whether you want to frame it as magical or not, it actually informed the stories I wanted to write. I felt I understood him in a way I hadn’t until that moment.

NG: I remember responding incredibly well as a kid to Julius Schwartz’s The Private Life of Clark Kent stories. Just the idea that he would go off and try to solve things as Clark Kent. The stuff that we probably mocked when we were just starting out in comics, because it was close enough to us that we mocked it. Things like Green Lantern/Green Arrow, which I now look back and think, “This is actually every bit as good as I thought when I was 14.” But when I was 24…

GM: When you’re 24 you see it in a historical context which has changed and a lot of it seems very shrill and strident, but then you look back on it and you think, well, that’s perfect. The time needed that, after Vietnam and with the President about to betray everyone.

NG: Whenever I see you now, you are this glorious bird of paradise, but I remember, just as for you I will always be a nervous, hungry young journalist, I remember you as a kid in a black raincoat, incredibly shy. The thing that would get you animated was the point where you’d start talking about a story, and you would come to life.

GM: I was really shy around new people, but I was in a band at the time. And when I did comics, it was also a performance. It’s like playing live. You don’t get much time to edit; we don’t really do second drafts in our business. I love that aspect of comics, where you could have a Sandman out and people would be talking about it immediately, and we could be responding to things that were happening all around us and it could be published three months later, or two months later, depending on how late we were. It’s not like writing a book, which is over a span of years like building a cathedral. The comic is so instant. That’s why it covers the seismic shifts of culture very, very accurately.

NG: The truth is, when I was doing Sandman — it may have changed by the end, when I knew it was being collected in hardbacks and stuff — but definitely for the first years of Sandman, I thought I was doing something disposable. And that was part of the joy of it. It’s here this month and it’ll get you excited, but in a month’s time it will be in the bargain bins, and in two months’ time, you’ll have to hunt for it.

GM: Or it will only be in your memories. Like so many of the books I had as a kid and don’t have any more, where I have these images of little teddy bears dressed on gigantic night-black seas in my head, and I’ll never find these books again.

NG: I can read the comics I read as a 12-year-old now through those same 12-year-old eyes, but if I missed any issues and I try to read them now as a 50-year-old, I can’t do that.

GM: When I was writing the book, the things that were the most joy for me was reading those things again and finding new things in them. I started with Action Comics and just went through.

NG: What do you think it’s going to be like for people 50 years from now looking back at the Grant Morrison opus? You’ve got all of these themes, obviously your favorite things, but what else do you think they would find when they go looking?

GM: I don’t know. I never thought of it as lasting. I always considered it, as you said, as ephemeral. The only thing I wrote for the ages was All-Star Superman. Honestly, I believe that in a couple generations I’ll be utterly forgotten except for a footnote in a Batman story, so I don’t know. I can’t even imagine.

NG: I can’t see you being footnoted.

GM: Well, that’s lovely of you to say. But I feel like I’m here, I’ve got a chance to shine, to wave at the public and say, “Hi,” and connect to the people you like and who like you.

NG: Alright, let me throw this back at you. Things that I have loved over the years that you have done. I love the way that you both initially embraced, and then rapidly moved beyond, or moved in a completely different direction from, the ‘80s grim-and-gritty thing. There was a little while where we were trying to take this stuff seriously, and then, we went off in very, very strange and interesting directions. What I love about what you began doing then was initially your narratives were always meta-narratives, and they were always smarter than they needed to be. You’d put in gags, lines, thoughts, going all the way back to Danny the Street. Danny La Rue as a transvestite street, that’s glorious. But you were willing to, for lack of a better word, assert your reality. You didn’t want to mimic anybody else’s.

GM: The big break for me was I got tired of looking at stuff like The Dark Knight and Watchmen, which are wonderful and beautiful works, but for me the idea of taking our problems into the superhero world is ultimately a dead-end. When I was 25 or 26 it occurred to me that trying to make superheroes seem real was insane. They were not real in that way, but what really hit me was, “Well, in what way are they real?” They’re absolutely real in the form of paper, and so I wanted to go beyond that spurious realism of here’s what would happen if Batman got a run in his tights, or, “How does he go to the bathroom?” “Where does he keep his change?” Which I think are very dumb questions. In the book, one of the things I say is that people always believe kids don’t understand the difference between fact and fiction. But they do! A child can watch The Little Mermaid and they know the singing crabs on TV are very different from the real crabs on the beach. You give an adult a piece of fiction, and the adult cannot handle it. The adult begins to ask, “How can Batman afford to run a business and be Batman at night?” “How do the lasers come out of Superman’s eyes?” “Why does he wear those clothes?” And all you want to say is, “Because it’s not real!” It’s made up, and only in the made-up world can these things happen. I find that, in the last 10 years particularly, there’s this idea of grounding Superman, which just seems insane to me. And that’s what you always get from studio executives, is, “How do we ground this?”

NG: The other thing I love that you hear all the time from movie executives is, “What are the rules of this world?” Nobody gives you rules for any world. You figure it out as you go along and weird s— happens.

GM: And obviously rules eventually arise, but it comes from the narrative. And it doesn’t have to be this world’s rules. Adults need to get a grasp of this. These things aren’t real and we can make anything happen. And that’s exactly what’s so wonderful about it.

Read more of Neil Gaiman and Grant Morrison’s conversation in the current issue of Entertainment Weekly.
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Re: Batman, Inc.

Postby TheButcher on Fri Aug 05, 2011 9:08 pm

Batman, Incorporated To End Early
Graeme McMillan wrote:An interesting tidbit of information from Chris Arrant’s latest “Late List” for CBR: Batman, Incorporated #9 and 10 will not be released, due to late shipping. Instead, #8 will be the last issue of the series, with the material intended for the final two issues being combined into a oneshot called Batman Incorporated: Leviathan Strikes to act as a bridge between the original series and 2012′s twelve issue second volume.

Considering the shipping delays that both Incorporated and The Dark Knight ended up suffering in their short runs, it’s safe to say that the most recent Batman relaunch is an example of how not to relaunch your biggest franchise – and, hopefully, a lesson learned by DC as we head into next month’s New 52.
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Re: Grant Morrison vs Mark Millar

Postby TheButcher on Mon Aug 22, 2011 10:58 pm

From Bleeding Cool:
Identity Crisis, “What The Fuck Is This?” – Grant Morrison, Rolling Stone Magazine
Rich Johnston wrote:Grant Morrison said a lot of things in his Rolling Stone Magazine interview (and more comic-specific outtakes). Here are five things from the latter. There’s plenty more where that came from.

4. On the split with Mark Millar -
“It was quite hard, I felt, but he had to make his own way, and he was in denial that I’d been there, because I saw a lot of his work had been plotted or devised, even dialogue suggestions were done by me right up until the point of The Ultimates.”
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Re: Alan Moore vs Grant Morrison

Postby TheButcher on Mon Aug 22, 2011 11:00 pm

Rich Johnston wrote:2. On Alan Moore and rape –
“I suddenly think how many times has somebody been raped in an Alan Moore story? And I couldn’t find a single one where someone wasn’t raped except for Tom Strong, which I believe was a pastiche. We know Alan Moore isn’t a misogynist but fuck, he’s obsessed with rape.”
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Re: The Official Grant Morrison Thread

Postby TheButcher on Mon Aug 29, 2011 11:09 pm

Grant Morrison Reinvents Superman, Can He Rescue DC Comics?
Susan Karlin wrote:It's the most iconic title in the DC Comics canon. When the original Action Comics #1 debuted in 1938, it featured the first appearance of Superman and is regarded as the first superhero comic. It's also the most expensive--last year, #1 commanded $1 million on the auction block.

On Sept. 7, DC Comics will launch the revamped Action Comics, written by veteran comics auteur Grant Morrison--hot off his lauded new book, Supergods. Morrison has the superhuman task of reinventing one of the comic world's--and popular culture's--biggest characters for the 21st century, and, in the process, trying to write a new chapter for the struggling comic book publishing industry.

"I felt the weight of history with this one," says Morrison in his soft-spoken Glaswegian lilt. "I wanted to do something that was as much a part of these times as when (Action Comics) first came out. Superman has always been the champion of the oppressed. I wanted to move away from the standard superhero tales and in the direction of folk tales in the vein of a Paul Bunyan."

In the revised version, featuring art by Rags Morales (penciling), Rick Bryant (inking), Brad Anderson (color) and Patrick Brosseau (lettering), Morrison pares down the convoluted narrative that began overshadowing the Superman myth. "It had become a pro-wrestling contest between characters-- who was stronger, faster, bigger," he says. "I wanted to evoke a more universal human Superman, who was less of a costumed figure representing patriotic authority, and more about struggles on the street."

The exclusive page 18 panel shown above is the first major shot of the Man of Steel transitioning to alter ego Clark Kent--sans his trademark horn-rimmed glasses--after thwarting trouble in Metropolis. Superman's fighting crime, of course, but the authorities are suspicious of his powers. He's misunderstood. He's different.

The Action Comics overhaul is part of DC's 52-title, issue 1, day-and-date publishing reboot that kicks off Aug. 31 with Justice League by writer/DC Entertainment Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns and artist/DC Comics Co-Publisher Jim Lee. The remaining titles will be released throughout September as a way to combat an overall trend in waning comic book sales and attract a new generation of readers through modernized characters and storylines.

The first six issues of the new Action Comics delve into the origin and evolution of Superman's costume from a makeshift blue jeans and "S-emblem" T-shirt to the blue bodysuit, redesigned by Jim Lee and the source of much fanboy hand-wringing. The one constant is the red cape: "It came with him from his home planet and is indestructible," says Morrison. "No one's depicted it as a security blanket before, protecting him from all harm. It gives it a fairytale feel, before his powers fully develop."

For all of his current enthusiasm, Morrison was initially apprehensive about taking on the assignment when DC Comics Co-Publisher Dan DiDio called at the beginning of this year.

"I wasn't too sure about it," he says. "I was already doing Batman. But I had some ideas about Superman's early years that I'd never had a chance to use. He's initially more of a blue collar, rough-and-ready character who has to grapple with developing superpowers and what it means to be Superman. He's the son of brilliant scientists from this other planet, but he grew up baling hay and working in a convenience store, which is where he gets his morals."

Just as the first Action Comics premiered against the backdrop of the Great Depression, imminent technological advancements like television, and the rise of Nazi Germany, Morrison wanted to tap the zeitgeist of current economic and global turbulence, as well as infuse his foreigner's perspective of America to into Clark Kent's alien acclimation to humans.

"I'm definitely aware of the current atmosphere, and have addressed that, not in drawing from the headlines, but symbolically dealing with combating a sense of existential terror," says Morrison. "Sometimes a perspective from the outside enables you to see the best of what America has to offer."

Serendipitously, Morrison's work on his memoir/cultural history of superheroes, Supergods: What Masked Vigilantes, Miraculous Mutants, and a Sun God from Smallville Can Teach Us About Being Human (Spiegel & Grau), helped codify Morrison's thoughts on Superman.

"The original Action Comics is a piece of art in its own right and way ahead of its time," says Morrison. "It helped me to use the concept of superhero to change the idea about self and culture from doom and pessimism to hope and possibility."
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Re: Grant Morrison's Multiversity

Postby TheButcher on Fri Sep 02, 2011 10:27 pm

Morrison Writes a Social Justice Superman in ACTION COMICS
Vaneta Rogers wrote:Newsarama:
As long as I've got you on the phone Grant, can you just give us an update on Multiversity and your Batman work?

Grant Morrison:
Batman Incorporated, I know Chris is about halfway through the last issue, issue #10. So although that's late, it will be out soon. And then the Leviathan book will be scheduled to come out, I think, at the start of the year. Again, we want to keep that one monthly. So the idea is to get a little bit ahead and not have the problems we had on Batman Incorporated.

But yeah, that's all going. And Multiversity is going great. Frank Quitely is working on his pages right now. Nobody else has started, because we got Frank started first. But he's already going with his stuff. So all that stuff's going well.

Mutliversity is a lot more along the lines of the feel of Seven Soldiers, I think. I'm very pleased with it. I took a lot of time with it. And I think it's the best thing I've ever, ever done. If I stop after Multiversity, that will be good enough.
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