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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:26 pm
by Nachokoolaid
I'll be honest (where's that losing your geek cred thread?) and admit that my knowledge of the Call of Cthulhu consists of jamming out to the Metallica song of the same name, and that's about it.

PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 8:24 pm
by Kutulhu
Nachokoolaid wrote:I'll be honest (where's that losing your geek cred thread?) and admit that my knowledge of the Call of Cthulhu consists of jamming out to the Metallica song of the same name, and that's about it.


Well, here ya go, a LINK to the entire text of the story. Understand that it is not a linear plot. The opening line pretty much sums up Lovecraft's major theme.

"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far"

Note: Lovecraft is public domain, so this is legal

PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 8:31 pm
by Kutulhu
Oh, have you seen the cover art for the upcoming release of From Beyond.

It is possibly the worst cover in the history of civilization.


Image

PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 3:38 am
by Logan5
Kutulhu wrote:Oh, have you seen the cover art for the upcoming release of From Beyond.

It is possibly the worst cover in the history of civilization.


Image



:shock:

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 5:49 pm
by Hermanator X
Neil Gaiman Discusses H. P. Lovecraft

Quite a cool little chat about his thoughts on the author. I found this to wash out of my brain the awful awful trailer for the cthulu movie trailer which is getting a theatrical release in august. Do not seek it, it is beyond awful. Although Tori Spelling looks worse in it than anything HP could have dreamt up himself.

Re:

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 6:11 pm
by Chairman Kaga
Kutulhu wrote:Since we are speaking of Lovecraft, I really wish Guillermo del Toro would use the internet freakout about 01-18-08 to his advantage and get funding for his At The Mountains of Madness script.

"Look, they WANT a movie about Cthulhu" (although Cthulhu isnt central, it is mentioned)

You know at first I used to be enthused with the prospect but after seeing two films of what he has done with Hellboy as an adaptaion I would rather never see At The Mountains of Madness on screen than see a GDT version.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 6:16 pm
by Hermanator X
Yeah, when somethings called an unimaginable, or indescribable horror, its probably best left to the printed page rather than some cgi monstrosity that looks cool first time you see it. Filling in the blanks in your subconcious I think is the better option here, personally.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 6:52 pm
by papalazeru
Saw Reanimator last night as it was on TV.

Awesome

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:21 pm
by Chairman Kaga
I just threw up in my mouth a little. After finally reading the original story I can't stand to even think about Gordon's piece of tripe ever again.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:24 pm
by stereosforgeeks
Chairman Kaga wrote:I just threw up in my mouth a little. After finally reading the original story I can't stand to even think about Gordon's piece of tripe ever again.


Really? Thats actually one of my least favorite Lovecraft stories. Its too damn repetitive. I love the content, but i got a bit bored by the structure of it.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:27 pm
by Chairman Kaga
stereosforgeeks wrote:
Chairman Kaga wrote:I just threw up in my mouth a little. After finally reading the original story I can't stand to even think about Gordon's piece of tripe ever again.


Really? Thats actually one of my least favorite Lovecraft stories. Its too damn repetitive. I love the content, but i got a bit bored by the structure of it.

I agree with that but of course reading it collected together makes it appear more awkward. All of the repetition was necessary to remind the monthly reader of Home Brew what was going on from installment to installment of the story. If he wrote it as a short story rather than a serial I don't think he would have done all those "I knew Herbert West from back in medical school...." bits.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:59 pm
by stereosforgeeks
Chairman Kaga wrote:
stereosforgeeks wrote:
Chairman Kaga wrote:I just threw up in my mouth a little. After finally reading the original story I can't stand to even think about Gordon's piece of tripe ever again.


Really? Thats actually one of my least favorite Lovecraft stories. Its too damn repetitive. I love the content, but i got a bit bored by the structure of it.

I agree with that but of course reading it collected together makes it appear more awkward. All of the repetition was necessary to remind the monthly reader of Home Brew what was going on from installment to installment of the story. If he wrote it as a short story rather than a serial I don't think he would have done all those "I knew Herbert West from back in medical school...." bits.


Ohh I totally realize it was the nature of how the story was presented but it definitely hindered my enjoyment when reading it straight through.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 5:30 pm
by Raziel
The Call Of Cthulu And Other Weird Stories - H.P. Lovecraft.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 12:53 am
by The Todd
Raziel wrote:The Call Of Cthulu And Other Weird Stories - H.P. Lovecraft.


The Todd is currently reading this! (well, technically, I am currently reading The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories, but The Todd digresses)

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 12:47 pm
by theunforgettablefire
been trying to get into lovecraft for a while now, but he's hard to find.

on a related note, dumb question and all, but does anyone have the correct pronunciation of "Cthulu"? (possibly spelled wrong.)

i've always pronounced it "Thulu" like saying "Sulu" but with a lisp. So sort of like how George Takei would pronounce it.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 12:59 pm
by Ribbons
I personally pronounce it "Cha-too-loo" because it's fun to say (just like "Francisco"). That's almost definitely wrong, but yeah...

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:13 pm
by minstrel
The way it's spelled, I imagine it should sound something like a loud fart. But I've always pronounced it KTHOO-loo.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:50 pm
by The Vicar
The Elder Races hang their heads ( and tentacles ) in shame......

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:55 pm
by TonyWilson
"Kt-hoo-loo"

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 2:08 pm
by The Vicar
TonyWilson wrote:"Kt-hoo-loo"


Bless you.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 2:14 pm
by minstrel
The Vicar wrote:
TonyWilson wrote:"Kt-hoo-loo"


Bless you.


A rather inappropriate phrase for a Lovecraft thread, but so it goes ...

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 4:27 pm
by Nachokoolaid
minstrel wrote:The way it's spelled, I imagine it should sound something like a loud fart. But I've always pronounced it KTHOO-loo.

I pronounce the same. Ka-thoo-loo.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 4:40 pm
by Confused Pete
theunforgettablefire wrote:on a related note, dumb question and all, but does anyone have the correct pronunciation of "Cthulu"? (possibly spelled wrong.)


ak-te-puss

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 4:40 pm
by Chairman Kaga
The most used pronunciation, mostly endorsed by Chaosium games, is Ka-Thool-hoo or simply dropping the last H sound Ka-Thoo-Loo though Lovecraft never described it that way.

Wikipedia wrote:Lovecraft transcribed the pronunciation of Cthulhu as "Khlûl'-hloo" (IPA: /ˈkɬʊl.ɬuː/ ?).[2] S. T. Joshi points out, however, that Lovecraft gave several differing pronunciations on different occasions.[3] According to Lovecraft, this is merely the closest that the human vocal apparatus can come to reproducing the syllables of an alien language.[4] Long after Lovecraft's death, the pronunciation kə-THOO-loo (IPA: /kəˈθuːluː/) became common, and the game Call of Cthulhu endorsed it.


S.T. Joshi is essentially the foremost Lovecraft historian if anyone is curious. His annotated collections of Lovecraft's stories offer some fascinating information on the author.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 4:58 pm
by TheBaxter
theunforgettablefire wrote:on a related note, dumb question and all, but does anyone have the correct pronunciation of "Cthulu"? (possibly spelled wrong.)


soo-SOO-dee-oh.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 5:06 pm
by The Vicar
minstrel wrote:
The Vicar wrote:
TonyWilson wrote:"Kt-hoo-loo"


Bless you.


A rather inappropriate phrase for a Lovecraft thread, but so it goes ...


I loves me some irony, I do.....

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 5:13 pm
by Tyrone_Shoelaces
Wait, I thought we weren't supposed to say his name out loud.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:03 pm
by minstrel
Tyrone_Shoelaces wrote:Wait, I thought we weren't supposed to say his name out loud.


Candyman Candyman Candyman ...

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:05 pm
by The Vicar
minstrel wrote:
Tyrone_Shoelaces wrote:Wait, I thought we weren't supposed to say his name out loud.


Candyman Candyman Candyman ...



Hey look - it's Sammy Davis Jr!!

Re:

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:06 pm
by Nachokoolaid
Kutulhu wrote:
Nachokoolaid wrote:I'll be honest (where's that losing your geek cred thread?) and admit that my knowledge of the Call of Cthulhu consists of jamming out to the Metallica song of the same name, and that's about it.


Well, here ya go, a LINK to the entire text of the story. Understand that it is not a linear plot. The opening line pretty much sums up Lovecraft's major theme.

"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far"

Note: Lovecraft is public domain, so this is legal


Hmmm. Pretty damn good. I liked it overall.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:08 pm
by Chairman Kaga
Tyrone_Shoelaces wrote:Wait, I thought we weren't supposed to say his name out loud.

That's H___________ the Unspeakable.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:11 pm
by TheBaxter
Chairman Kaga wrote:
Tyrone_Shoelaces wrote:Wait, I thought we weren't supposed to say his name out loud.

That's H___________ the Unspeakable.


Hillary?

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:13 pm
by Chairman Kaga
The Queen in Yellow.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:20 pm
by Ribbons
Image

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 7:37 pm
by minstrel
I found a big batch of H.P. Lovecraft stories to download to my new Kindle, so I've finally starting reading some Lovecraft. It turns out he's all adjectives. He thinks he can make ordinary things horrifying if he keeps telling you they're horrifying. This is how Lovecraft would caption a standard beach resort postcard:

"The hideous beachball bounced grotesquely across the ancient nameless sand towards the horrid children who were playing sickeningly with their repulsive pails and loathsome shovels ..."

It would be fun to do a global search and replace of "Cthulhu" with "Fred G. Soames" and "R'Lyeh" with "Akron, Ohio". And replace those ugly statues of Cthulhu with posters of Justin Bieber.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 2:48 am
by magicmonkey
minstrel wrote:I found a big batch of H.P. Lovecraft stories to download to my new Kindle, so I've finally starting reading some Lovecraft. It turns out he's all adjectives. He thinks he can make ordinary things horrifying if he keeps telling you they're horrifying. This is how Lovecraft would caption a standard beach resort postcard:

"The hideous beachball bounced grotesquely across the ancient nameless sand towards the horrid children who were playing sickeningly with their repulsive pails and loathsome shovels ..."



Bwahahaha! Sounds like the summer holidays I remember... with Kirk.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:30 am
by TheBaxter
somebody, please, get william shatner to do an audiobook of h.p. lovecraft's stories.
the result would be hideously, grotesquely..... [dramatic pause]...... delicious.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 9:33 am
by magicmonkey
TheBaxter wrote:somebody, please, get william shatner to do an audiobook of h.p. lovecraft's stories.
the result would be hideously, grotesquely..... [dramatic pause]...... delicious.


But, only if he did it in song with Alan Moore doing the comic. Think Jeff Waynes "War of The World's" with 110% more toupee.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:08 pm
by minstrel
magicmonkey wrote:
TheBaxter wrote:somebody, please, get william shatner to do an audiobook of h.p. lovecraft's stories.
the result would be hideously, grotesquely..... [dramatic pause]...... delicious.


But, only if he did it in song with Alan Moore doing the comic. Think Jeff Waynes "War of The World's" with 110% more toupee.


"110% More Toupee" should be the title of Shatner's next album.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 5:08 pm
by The Vicar
magicmonkey wrote:
TheBaxter wrote:somebody, please, get william shatner to do an audiobook of h.p. lovecraft's stories.
the result would be hideously, grotesquely..... [dramatic pause]...... delicious.


But, only if he did it in song with Alan Moore doing the comic. Think Jeff Waynes "War of The World's" with 110% more toupee.


Comedy gold there, as da Dino would have said if the %^$^$#& hadn't bailed on us..... :(

Under the influence of HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2014 8:42 am
by TheButcher
Ian Tregillis in conversation with Charlie Stross on The Laundry Files

Anna Gregson wrote:This week sees the release of THE COLDEST WAR (UK | ANZ) , the second novel in Ian Tregillis’s landmark series, the Milkweed Triptych. The trilogy began with BITTER SEEDS (UK | ANZ) and concludes with the forthcoming NECESSARY EVIL (UK | ANZ).

These novels feature a secret history of Twentieth Century conflicts in which scientifically-enhanced superhumans and dark magic collide. The result is described by Fantasy Faction as ‘oh-so compelling, fascinating and frighteningly convincing’ and by Cory Doctorow as, ‘some of the best – and most exciting – alternate history I’ve read. Bravo.’

Ian:
One of the things I enjoy most about the Laundry books is the way they juxtapose spy drama, Lovecraftian horror, and the banality of office politics. They combine the profound and the mundane to great effect. Does it work because the narrowness of the corporate mindset can be laughable, or because matrix management is merely a different kind of unspeakable horror?

Charlie:
I’m not certain. However, I will note that both horror and humour are tints that we can apply to a narrative; the same plot structure and characters could in principle be written into a horror story or a farce, purely depending on how we colour the narrative.

Ian:
Fiction writers aren’t alone in thinking the occult makes an attractive dance partner for intelligence services. The CIA infamously speBitter Seeds - the first novel in the Milweed Triptych, a fantasy series featuring superhumand and dark magic, and earning comparisons with Charles Stross's Laundry Files novelsnt millions of dollars on its remote-viewing program, Project Stargate. It has also been alleged the Soviet navy attempted to investigate telepathy as a means of secure communications with submarines.

But the Laundry contends with extraordinarily dangerous powers, as do the intelligence operatives of the Milkweed books. How much stock would you put in the notion that a real-world three-letter agency *wouldn’t* jump at the chance to commune with ravenous extra-dimensional beings?

Charlie:
None whatsoever! Which is why at least one of the Laundry’s foreign counterparts, the Black Chamber, is pretty clearly run by the many-angled ones, and the Laundry itself is full of archives documenting highly questionable compromises. In fact, “the road to hell is paved with good intentions” could well serve as the overarching theme of the Laundry Files as a series (I have a long-term plot that is slowly unrolling) . . .

Back in 1997 when I began to explore this area, I started with a novelette titled “A Colder War”, which made it pretty explicit. ACW was set in the future of Lovecraft’s “At the Mountains of Madness” – a future in which Nazi Germany, the USSR, and the USA had all found their uses for the ancient alien technologies found by the Pabodie expedition to Antarctica. It all ends in tears (and a fate worse than global thermonuclear annihilation – the point of that story was to inject some horror back into Lovecraftiana by linking it implicitly to something truly horrifying, to anyone who grew up during the Cold War), but not before a Senator in a congressional hearing gets to utter the words, “Mister President, we cannot allow a Shoggoth Gap to emerge.”

Yes, if they got their hands on this stuff they’d use it. We have met the enemy, and we are doing our best to turn into them before they turn into us.

Re: HP Lovecraft

PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 8:39 am
by TheButcher