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Postby Maui on Thu Nov 29, 2007 11:54 pm

thomasgaffney wrote:
Maui wrote:Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky

We should add this to one of our polls in 2008.


Seconded. We'll find a place for it on some poll.


Yeah! My sister's 3D book club is reading it right now and they certainly aren't slouches at reading. No Krantz books there. 8)
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Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Nov 30, 2007 12:01 am

Maui wrote:My sister's 3D book club


3D book club? Do they just read pop-up books?
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Postby Maui on Fri Nov 30, 2007 12:02 am

thomasgaffney wrote:
Maui wrote:My sister's 3D book club


3D book club? Do they just read pop-up books?



I have a mutley graphic that I use when I find something funny.
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Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Nov 30, 2007 12:10 am

Maui wrote:
thomasgaffney wrote:
Maui wrote:My sister's 3D book club


3D book club? Do they just read pop-up books?



I have a mutley graphic that I use when I find something funny.


And I don't see it. So I guess that means you didn't find my joke funny. :cry:
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Postby Maui on Fri Nov 30, 2007 12:15 am

thomasgaffney wrote:
Maui wrote:
thomasgaffney wrote:
Maui wrote:My sister's 3D book club


3D book club? Do they just read pop-up books?



I have a mutley graphic that I use when I find something funny.


And I don't see it. So I guess that means you didn't find my joke funny. :cry:


A good ballpark effort. Keep trying. You may get a mutley.
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 05, 2007 3:52 pm

The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. (January 16, 2008)


From Publishers Weekly
The antireligion wars started by Daniel Dennett and Sam Harris will heat up even more with this salvo from celebrated Oxford biologist Dawkins. For a scientist who criticizes religion for its intolerance, Dawkins has written a surprisingly intolerant book, full of scorn for religion and those who believe. But Dawkins, who gave us the selfish gene, anticipates this criticism. He says it's the scientist and humanist in him that makes him hostile to religions—fundamentalist Christianity and Islam come in for the most opprobrium—that close people's minds to scientific truth, oppress women and abuse children psychologically with the notion of eternal damnation. While Dawkins can be witty, even confirmed atheists who agree with his advocacy of science and vigorous rationalism may have trouble stomaching some of the rhetoric: the biblical Yahweh is "psychotic," Aquinas's proofs of God's existence are "fatuous" and religion generally is "nonsense." The most effective chapters are those in which Dawkins calms down, for instance, drawing on evolution to disprove the ideas behind intelligent design. In other chapters, he attempts to construct a scientific scaffolding for atheism, such as using evolution again to rebut the notion that without God there can be no morality. He insists that religion is a divisive and oppressive force, but he is less convincing in arguing that the world would be better and more peaceful without it. (Oct. 18)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Scientific American
Richard Dawkins, in The God Delusion, tells of his exasperation with colleagues who try to play both sides of the street: looking to science for justification of their religious convictions while evading the most difficult implications—the existence of a prime mover sophisticated enough to create and run the universe, "to say nothing of mind reading millions of humans simultaneously." Such an entity, he argues, would have to be extremely complex, raising the question of how it came into existence, how it communicates —through spiritons!—and where it resides. Dawkins is frequently dismissed as a bully, but he is only putting theological doctrines to the same kind of scrutiny that any scientific theory must withstand. No one who has witnessed the merciless dissection of a new paper in physics would describe the atmosphere as overly polite.
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Postby thomasgaffney on Wed Dec 05, 2007 3:54 pm

Maui wrote:The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins.


Hehehehehe. Is all the "His Dark Materials" talk getting to you?
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 05, 2007 3:55 pm

thomasgaffney wrote:
Maui wrote:The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins.


Hehehehehe. Is all the "His Dark Materials" talk getting to you?


Oh perhaps a wee bit of humour intended there - but the book does look interesting.
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Postby minstrel on Wed Dec 05, 2007 4:57 pm

Maui wrote:
thomasgaffney wrote:
Maui wrote:The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins.


Hehehehehe. Is all the "His Dark Materials" talk getting to you?


Oh perhaps a wee bit of humour intended there - but the book does look interesting.


I've read it. It's pretty convincing, but, on the other hand, I was already an atheist.

It would be a good book for us to read, but the discussion thread would probably have to be in the EFBR. One good thing reading this book would do would be to give focus to our discussions of whether or not God exists, by allowing us to reference specific arguments and counterarguments found in the book.
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 05, 2007 5:00 pm

minstrel wrote:
I've read it. It's pretty convincing, but, on the other hand, I was already an atheist.


I may add it to my pile of books to read. It's got the Squirrel approval then?
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Postby minstrel on Wed Dec 05, 2007 5:08 pm

Maui wrote:
minstrel wrote:
I've read it. It's pretty convincing, but, on the other hand, I was already an atheist.


I may add it to my pile of books to read. It's got the Squirrel approval then?


Yes!
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 05, 2007 5:16 pm

minstrel wrote:
Maui wrote:
minst rel wrote:
I've read it. It's pretty convincing, but, on the other hand, I was already an atheist.


I may add it to my pile of books to read. It's got the Squirrel approval then?


Yes!


Cool - thanks! :)
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Postby Vegeta on Wed Dec 05, 2007 5:38 pm

The author sounds like one of those radical atheists to me.

Meaning someone who is as, if not more annoying as super devote Christians or Muslims (or any overtly religious person). The kind of person who shoves their faith in your face and down your throat. His just happens to be throwing anti-religion down your throat. Seems to me, he is trying to get just as many conversions as those he rallies against. I apologize as this post is more of an aside to the subject (meaning I am not reallly commenting on the book), it's just that IMO those who are hyper-atheist are just as annoying as those who are hyper-religious.
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 05, 2007 6:55 pm

The Science of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials
by Mary and John Gribbin (with an introduction by Philip Pullman)

'The award-winning science writers reveal how the trilogy is rooted in astonishing scientific truth. Drawing on string theory and spacetime, quantum physics and chaos theory, they answer fascinating questions such as: ''Could parallel worlds, like Will and Lyra's, really exist?''. ''How does Will's subtle knife cut through anything?''. ''Could there be a bomb like the one made with Lyra's hair?''. And, of course: ''What are the Dark Materials?''.'

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Postby stereosforgeeks on Wed Dec 05, 2007 6:58 pm

I wonder how scientific it would be.

I would want it to go in-depth on string theory, spacetime etc...
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 05, 2007 7:01 pm

Vegeta wrote:The author sounds like one of those radical atheists to me.

Meaning someone who is as, if not more annoying as super devote Christians or Muslims (or any overtly religious person). The kind of person who shoves their faith in your face and down your throat. His just happens to be throwing anti-religion down your throat. Seems to me, he is trying to get just as many conversions as those he rallies against. I apologize as this post is more of an aside to the subject (meaning I am not reallly commenting on the book), it's just that IMO those who are hyper-atheist are just as annoying as those who are hyper-religious.


Oh I dunno - I don't get that feeling like I'm trying to be converted while I read the trilogy. It's there to read, enjoy - form your own conclusions.
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Postby Vegeta on Wed Dec 05, 2007 7:38 pm

Maui wrote:The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. (January 16, 2008)


From Publishers Weekly
The antireligion wars started by Daniel Dennett and Sam Harris will heat up even more with this salvo from celebrated Oxford biologist Dawkins. For a scientist who criticizes religion for its intolerance, Dawkins has written a surprisingly intolerant book, full of scorn for religion and those who believe. But Dawkins, who gave us the selfish gene, anticipates this criticism. He says it's the scientist and humanist in him that makes him hostile to religions—fundamentalist Christianity and Islam come in for the most opprobrium—that close people's minds to scientific truth, oppress women and abuse children psychologically with the notion of eternal damnation. While Dawkins can be witty, even confirmed atheists who agree with his advocacy of science and vigorous rationalism may have trouble stomaching some of the rhetoric: the biblical Yahweh is "psychotic," Aquinas's proofs of God's existence are "fatuous" and religion generally is "nonsense." The most effective chapters are those in which Dawkins calms down, for instance, drawing on evolution to disprove the ideas behind intelligent design. In other chapters, he attempts to construct a scientific scaffolding for atheism, such as using evolution again to rebut the notion that without God there can be no morality. He insists that religion is a divisive and oppressive force, but he is less convincing in arguing that the world would be better and more peaceful without it. (Oct. 18)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Scientific American
Richard Dawkins, in The God Delusion, tells of his exasperation with colleagues who try to play both sides of the street: looking to science for justification of their religious convictions while evading the most difficult implications—the existence of a prime mover sophisticated enough to create and run the universe, "to say nothing of mind reading millions of humans simultaneously." Such an entity, he argues, would have to be extremely complex, raising the question of how it came into existence, how it communicates —through spiritons!—and where it resides. Dawkins is frequently dismissed as a bully, but he is only putting theological doctrines to the same kind of scrutiny that any scientific theory must withstand. No one who has witnessed the merciless dissection of a new paper in physics would describe the atmosphere as overly polite.


I was referring to this.... or is this a book in the "His Dark Materials" series.
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Postby DaleTremont on Wed Dec 05, 2007 7:41 pm

Vegeta wrote:
Maui wrote:The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. (January 16, 2008)


From Publishers Weekly
The antireligion wars started by Daniel Dennett and Sam Harris will heat up even more with this salvo from celebrated Oxford biologist Dawkins. For a scientist who criticizes religion for its intolerance, Dawkins has written a surprisingly intolerant book, full of scorn for religion and those who believe. But Dawkins, who gave us the selfish gene, anticipates this criticism. He says it's the scientist and humanist in him that makes him hostile to religions—fundamentalist Christianity and Islam come in for the most opprobrium—that close people's minds to scientific truth, oppress women and abuse children psychologically with the notion of eternal damnation. While Dawkins can be witty, even confirmed atheists who agree with his advocacy of science and vigorous rationalism may have trouble stomaching some of the rhetoric: the biblical Yahweh is "psychotic," Aquinas's proofs of God's existence are "fatuous" and religion generally is "nonsense." The most effective chapters are those in which Dawkins calms down, for instance, drawing on evolution to disprove the ideas behind intelligent design. In other chapters, he attempts to construct a scientific scaffolding for atheism, such as using evolution again to rebut the notion that without God there can be no morality. He insists that religion is a divisive and oppressive force, but he is less convincing in arguing that the world would be better and more peaceful without it. (Oct. 18)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Scientific American
Richard Dawkins, in The God Delusion, tells of his exasperation with colleagues who try to play both sides of the street: looking to science for justification of their religious convictions while evading the most difficult implications—the existence of a prime mover sophisticated enough to create and run the universe, "to say nothing of mind reading millions of humans simultaneously." Such an entity, he argues, would have to be extremely complex, raising the question of how it came into existence, how it communicates —through spiritons!—and where it resides. Dawkins is frequently dismissed as a bully, but he is only putting theological doctrines to the same kind of scrutiny that any scientific theory must withstand. No one who has witnessed the merciless dissection of a new paper in physics would describe the atmosphere as overly polite.


I was referring to this.... or is this a book in the "His Dark Materials" series.


And of course journalists are never biased.
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 05, 2007 7:45 pm

Vegeta wrote:
Maui wrote:The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. (January 16, 2008)


From Publishers Weekly
The antireligion wars started by Daniel Dennett and Sam Harris will heat up even more with this salvo from celebrated Oxford biologist Dawkins. For a scientist who criticizes religion for its intolerance, Dawkins has written a surprisingly intolerant book, full of scorn for religion and those who believe. But Dawkins, who gave us the selfish gene, anticipates this criticism. He says it's the scientist and humanist in him that makes him hostile to religions—fundamentalist Christianity and Islam come in for the most opprobrium—that close people's minds to scientific truth, oppress women and abuse children psychologically with the notion of eternal damnation. While Dawkins can be witty, even confirmed atheists who agree with his advocacy of science and vigorous rationalism may have trouble stomaching some of the rhetoric: the biblical Yahweh is "psychotic," Aquinas's proofs of God's existence are "fatuous" and religion generally is "nonsense." The most effective chapters are those in which Dawkins calms down, for instance, drawing on evolution to disprove the ideas behind intelligent design. In other chapters, he attempts to construct a scientific scaffolding for atheism, such as using evolution again to rebut the notion that without God there can be no morality. He insists that religion is a divisive and oppressive force, but he is less convincing in arguing that the world would be better and more peaceful without it. (Oct. 18)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Scientific American
Richard Dawkins, in The God Delusion, tells of his exasperation with colleagues who try to play both sides of the street: looking to science for justification of their religious convictions while evading the most difficult implications—the existence of a prime mover sophisticated enough to create and run the universe, "to say nothing of mind reading millions of humans simultaneously." Such an entity, he argues, would have to be extremely complex, raising the question of how it came into existence, how it communicates —through spiritons!—and where it resides. Dawkins is frequently dismissed as a bully, but he is only putting theological doctrines to the same kind of scrutiny that any scientific theory must withstand. No one who has witnessed the merciless dissection of a new paper in physics would describe the atmosphere as overly polite.


I was referring to this.... or is this a book in the "His Dark Materials" series.


Oopsie daisies! Je m'excuse! :(

Well ask Minstrel, he's read the book.

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Postby minstrel on Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:49 pm

Vegeta wrote:The author sounds like one of those radical atheists to me.

Meaning someone who is as, if not more annoying as super devote Christians or Muslims (or any overtly religious person). The kind of person who shoves their faith in your face and down your throat. His just happens to be throwing anti-religion down your throat. Seems to me, he is trying to get just as many conversions as those he rallies against. I apologize as this post is more of an aside to the subject (meaning I am not reallly commenting on the book), it's just that IMO those who are hyper-atheist are just as annoying as those who are hyper-religious.


Well, I have too much respect for Dawkins to classify him that way. I only found one or two places in the book where he let the language go a bit over-the-top. Basically, he's trying to take down religion because he has REASONS to do so. To him, it doesn't make sense, and the more science learns, the less sense religion makes.

Actually, let me rephrase that: the more science learns, the less sense belief in God makes.

Dawkins is actually fairly gentle with religious people - he just exposes the weakness of their belief scientifically. The guy is NOT a journalist. He is a highly-respected evolutionary biologist - a scientist with serious credentials.

If you want to read a book that tries to take down RELIGION, as opposed to belief in God, Christopher Hitchens goes for the jugular in God Is Not Great. I recommend it, too, but it's lighter on the science. Hitchens IS a journalist, and his targets tend to be the hypocrites throughout history who have promoted religion for their own gain - either financially, or in prestige, or whatever. For example, years ago he exposed Mother Teresa as a fraud in a magazine article. He recaps that in his book, along with caustic takedowns of the Mormon church, and Islam, and so on.
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Postby minstrel on Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:52 pm

Vegeta wrote:The author sounds like one of those radical atheists to me.

Meaning someone who is as, if not more annoying as super devote Christians or Muslims (or any overtly religious person). The kind of person who shoves their faith in your face and down your throat. His just happens to be throwing anti-religion down your throat. Seems to me, he is trying to get just as many conversions as those he rallies against. I apologize as this post is more of an aside to the subject (meaning I am not reallly commenting on the book), it's just that IMO those who are hyper-atheist are just as annoying as those who are hyper-religious.


To get an understanding of Richard Dawkins' position without bothering to read the book, look here.
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Postby Vegeta on Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:28 pm

Oh, I get his position... and I am not even saying he is wrong.


...Actually, I should just recuse myself from the conversation, since it appears I came in in the middle of it. :oops:
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Postby Vegeta on Fri Dec 07, 2007 1:27 pm

I think since Scorcese is making it into a movie Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane could be a good pick for January.

That or I've been itching to read Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay. I've been intentionally avoiding the Showtime show because I wanted to read one of the novels first.
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Postby Seppuku on Fri Dec 07, 2007 2:42 pm

I recommend we read something I can download from here (it's your choice), as I'm usually stone broke around January. I hate having such a large family of Indian Givers!
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Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Dec 07, 2007 3:02 pm

seppukudkurosawa wrote:I recommend we read something I can download from here (it's your choice), as I'm usually stone broke around January. I hate having such a large family of Indian Givers!


Duly noted.
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Postby Seppuku on Fri Dec 07, 2007 3:04 pm

thomasgaffney wrote:
seppukudkurosawa wrote:I recommend we read something I can download from here (it's your choice), as I'm usually stone broke around January. I hate having such a large family of Indian Givers!


Duly noted.


Thanks Gaffney. Still, if I've got to buy it, I'll spend the fiver. I much prefer having something solid in my hands... :? I mean a book!



In fact, can we get the next book club underway now? If I don't read something soon, I think I'm at risk of turning into Kirk!
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Postby The Vicar on Fri Dec 07, 2007 3:33 pm

I Am Legend by Richard Matheson is up to #17 on the bestseller list ... film tie-in be damned.
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Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Dec 07, 2007 3:54 pm

seppukudkurosawa wrote:I much prefer having something solid in my hands... :? I mean a book!


Yeah, I need to have the actual book in my hands, or I tend to lose interest too quickly. Plus, all that staring at a monitor hurts me eyes.

seppukudkurosawa wrote:In fact, can we get the next book club underway now? I think I'm starting to turn into Kirk!


That we can. Now taking nominations for January's Book of the Month (I'll change the thread title soon). The theme for January will be NON-FICTION. All noms must be seconded to be included on the polls. I will be adding a poll this month and I hope everyone sticks with the honor system when it comes to voting (especially that Maui...I hear she has a small village of alts).

I'll start off by nominating The World Without Us by Alan Weisman (sorry Sepp!). A look at humanity's effect on the planet by envisioning the Earth if mankind suddenly disappeared, but left our entire infrastructure in tact (buildings, roads, domesticated pets, etc).

seppukudkurosawa wrote:I recommend we read something I can download from here (it's your choice), as I'm usually stone broke around January.


I haven't looked through all the books, but if there are any interesting non-fiction books that are available for downloading/reading online, I'm sure Sepp would appreciate the gesture!
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Postby Seppuku on Fri Dec 07, 2007 3:59 pm

thomasgaffney wrote:
seppukudkurosawa wrote:I recommend we read something I can download from here (it's your choice), as I'm usually stone broke around January.


I haven't looked through all the books, but if there are any interesting non-fiction books that are available for downloading/reading online, I'm sure Sepp would appreciate the gesture!


Now I feel like the kid who always has to borrow money from his friends to buy sweets because his dad ran away, leaving his mum to fend for her five children ( :P too close to the bone).

Pick what you like, I'll be down for it. Though I think there is a non-fiction section down near the bottom of the page.
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Postby Vegeta on Fri Dec 07, 2007 4:01 pm

Officially nominating, non-fiction be damned :-P

Vegeta wrote:I think since Scorcese is making it into a movie Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane could be a good pick for January.

That or I've been itching to read Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay. I've been intentionally avoiding the Showtime show because I wanted to read one of the novels first.
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Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Dec 07, 2007 4:06 pm

Vegeta wrote:Officially nominating, non-fiction be damned :-P

Vegeta wrote:I think since Scorcese is making it into a movie Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane could be a good pick for January.

That or I've been itching to read Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay. I've been intentionally avoiding the Showtime show because I wanted to read one of the novels first.


I was going to group Mystery with Crime and True Crime (unless everyone feels differently) in one of the summer months, so I'm saving these two for then. If there is a lot of interest in either of these books, I'll move the Mystery/Crime/True Crime theme up to February.
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Postby Vegeta on Fri Dec 07, 2007 4:42 pm

Ah, I didn't realize there was themes to the months. My bad...


Not that I am protesting your pick, but "The World Without Us" doesn't really sound like non-fiction to me. Well, not non-fiction in the classic sense at any rate.
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Postby St. Alphonzo on Fri Dec 07, 2007 5:03 pm

Vegeta wrote:Ah, I didn't realize there was themes to the months. My bad...


Not that I am protesting your pick, but "The World Without Us" doesn't really sound like non-fiction to me. Well, not non-fiction in the classic sense at any rate.


Actually it is. It's a history of humankind's impact on the planet. The "what if we were to disappear tomorrow" conceit is really just a method by which the author can emphasize just how much damage we have done. It discusses evolution, the petro-chemical industry, migrations, extinctions, genetic engineering, industrial farming... you name it.

Fantastic book. I highly recommend it.
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Postby Seppuku on Fri Dec 07, 2007 5:34 pm

OK, I nominate Down & Out in Paris & London by George Orwell. Here's a real Catch 22 for ya: we here in Blighty used to have a law whereby a hobo could only stay at a hostel for one night before being forced to move on to the next one, let's say, twenty miles down the road. Now how on Earth we expected them to haul themselves out of the mire when they spent all their time following the bum trail, I don't know. A dingy, grotty, enlightening little read.
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Postby Fawst on Fri Dec 07, 2007 5:43 pm

I almost want to second Darkly Dreaming Dexter, simply because (SEMISPOILER) the ending just kind of happens without a lot of explanation/fanfare and I want to see people's reactions to it.
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Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Dec 07, 2007 5:49 pm

seppukudkurosawa wrote:OK, I nominate Down & Out in Paris & London by George Orwell. Here's a real Catch 22 for ya: we here in Blighty used to have a law whereby a hobo could only stay at a hostel for one night before being forced to move on to the next one, let's say, twenty miles down the road. Now how on Earth we expected them to haul themselves out of the mire when they spent all their time following the bum trail, I don't know. A dingy, grotty, enlightening little read.


If this seconded by someone, I'll probably allow it unless we have a plethora of non-fiction nominees up for voting. While I do see that it is semi-autobiographical, it's also classified by the major book sellers as Fiction-Travel/Transportation and Fiction/Literature.

Allowing this to get voted on would be like allowing A Million Little Pieces to get voted on for non-fiction and THAT is not happening.....
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Postby Maui on Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:57 pm

Anyone for some Stephen Hawking? ;)
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Mon Dec 10, 2007 2:25 pm

Ok, on the nonfiction front, here are a few suggestions. Most of the nonfiction I read is of the historical variety, with an emphasis on folks killing each other. I love books on WWII in particular (as I've said umpteen times) but I realize they are certainly not everyone's cup of tea.

Still, here are a few suggestions, please note....all of these (except the last one) are really loooong and might not work that well here:

1) The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944 by Rick Atkinson. This book appears on "best of nonfiction 2007" lists everywhere and is supposed to be fantastic. I haven't read it yet. It's the second book in a trilogy, though I doubt that reading the first book (see below) is a prerequisite to enjoying this one. The downside...it's only available in hardcover.

2) on that note, I also suggest Atkinson's first book in the trilogy, An Army at Dawn, The War in Africa, 1942-1943 which I have read and is really, really good (for geeks like me anyway).

3) Team of Rivals, the Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln is an interesting treatise on Lincoln's presidency, his political rivals and the transition of those rivals into Lincoln's cabinet. While the focus is Lincoln (who has 10,000 biographers, obviously) the "story" is about Lincoln and his interactions with those extremely powerful political figures, such as William Seward. The book starts slowly and is really long. Pick it up at your own risk, but I enjoyed it.

4) Here's one with a movie connection...sorta. Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose was the impetus for the much-loved HBO miniseries (which Ambrose served as a consultant on). The book has greater breadth and depth than the series does. While all of the favorites are covered in depth (Winters, Nixon, Lipton, Guarnere, etc) the book also gives insight into other Easy men who were by necessity cut out of the picture in the mini. The book also gives much greater depth with respect to Easy's overall participation in the ETO. Really good book that anyone who has seen the mini should read.

5) All of the books I've listed are quite long (BoB is the shortest). In the interest of remembering that this is a book club, I'd also suggest another Ambrose book, Pegasus Bridge. It's only about 200 pages long and tells the story, on a minute by minute basis, of a single action during the invasion of Normandy, the attack by glider of a key bridge near the beach head by men of the Ox and Bucks brigade in the early morning hours of D-Day. The men come down in gliders...at night...must attack and hold the bridge until relieved by men from the beach head. It's an exciting story. If you've seen The Longest Day, the story is told there in extremely brief form.

Anyway, there are a few suggestions. I like them all...but then I've been known to read history textbooks so take them for what they are worth. :lol:
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Postby thomasgaffney on Mon Dec 10, 2007 2:36 pm

Lord Voldemoo wrote:5) All of the books I've listed are quite long (BoB is the shortest). In the interest of remembering that this is a book club, I'd also suggest another Ambrose book, Pegasus Bridge. It's only about 200 pages long and tells the story, on a minute by minute basis, of a single action during the invasion of Normandy, the attack by glider of a key bridge near the beach head by men of the Ox and Bucks brigade in the early morning hours of D-Day. The men come down in gliders...at night...must attack and hold the bridge until relieved by men from the beach head. It's an exciting story. If you've seen The Longest Day, the story is told there in extremely brief form.

Anyway, there are a few suggestions. I like them all...but then I've been known to read history textbooks so take them for what they are worth. :lol:


200 pages? I'll second Pegasus Bridge.....
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Mon Dec 10, 2007 3:26 pm

thomasgaffney wrote:
Lord Voldemoo wrote:5) All of the books I've listed are quite long (BoB is the shortest). In the interest of remembering that this is a book club, I'd also suggest another Ambrose book, Pegasus Bridge. It's only about 200 pages long and tells the story, on a minute by minute basis, of a single action during the invasion of Normandy, the attack by glider of a key bridge near the beach head by men of the Ox and Bucks brigade in the early morning hours of D-Day. The men come down in gliders...at night...must attack and hold the bridge until relieved by men from the beach head. It's an exciting story. If you've seen The Longest Day, the story is told there in extremely brief form.

Anyway, there are a few suggestions. I like them all...but then I've been known to read history textbooks so take them for what they are worth. :lol:


200 pages? I'll second Pegasus Bridge.....


It's a reasonably fun, quick and easy read. Ambrose wrote it pretty early on in his career and it's far from his best work, but it is a good read...and would probably be the best choice of those listed for those who are not as in to this kind of stuff as I am.
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Postby Vegeta on Mon Dec 10, 2007 3:36 pm

That does sound interesting, Moo! That is more along the lines of non-fiction I would read, on the rare occasion that I do.
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Postby Seppuku on Wed Dec 12, 2007 12:58 pm

I'll second (or third if Alphonzo counts) Gaffney's The World Without Us nomination, as I just got given a copy as an early Christmas present.
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Postby St. Alphonzo on Wed Dec 12, 2007 12:59 pm

seppukudkurosawa wrote:I'll second (or third if Alphonzo counts) Gaffney's The World Without Us nomination, as I just got given a copy as an early Christmas present.


I hope I count :wink:


And yes, I would love to discuss that one...
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Postby thomasgaffney on Wed Dec 12, 2007 6:15 pm

St. Alphonzo wrote:
seppukudkurosawa wrote:I'll second (or third if Alphonzo counts) Gaffney's The World Without Us nomination, as I just got given a copy as an early Christmas present.


I hope I count :wink:


And yes, I would love to discuss that one...


I wasn't sure if Alphonzo was an official "second" or not, but now that it's officially seconded, The World Without Us will be on the list.

I'll have more updates and crap after I return from being out of town.....
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Wed Dec 12, 2007 6:18 pm

thomasgaffney wrote:
St. Alphonzo wrote:
seppukudkurosawa wrote:I'll second (or third if Alphonzo counts) Gaffney's The World Without Us nomination, as I just got given a copy as an early Christmas present.


I hope I count :wink:


And yes, I would love to discuss that one...


I wasn't sure if Alphonzo was an official "second" or not, but now that it's officially seconded, The World Without Us will be on the list.

I'll have more updates and crap after I return from being out of town.....


I just read your blurb about that, sounds very interesting. I'd definitely be up for it.
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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 12, 2007 6:28 pm

Lord Voldemoo wrote:I just read your blurb about that, sounds very interesting. I'd definitely be up for it.


Me too - count me in for this one! Looks like an intriguing read.
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Postby thomasgaffney on Wed Dec 12, 2007 8:13 pm

Maui wrote:
Lord Voldemoo wrote:I just read your blurb about that, sounds very interesting. I'd definitely be up for it.


Me too - count me in for this one! Looks like an intriguing read.


Well, I will still put up a poll for January's non-fiction selections, but so far a LOT people seem interested in The World Without Us. I would have no problem picking, reading, and discussing it.....
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Postby DaleTremont on Wed Dec 12, 2007 8:33 pm

The World Without Us sounds pretty neat. There's a science fiction book called "Earth Abides" about the world after humanity is all but wiped out and has some beautiful passages on the way nature slowly takes over the remnants of civilization (but I digress.)

Would anyone be up for Collapse? I haven't read it but I've heard it's incredible. Basically about the collapse of civilizations and what leads to it.

Of course there's also.....Easy Riders, Raging Bulls

























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Postby Maui on Wed Dec 12, 2007 10:18 pm

I'm gonna throw this book into the non fiction mix as I've heard such great things about it, as well my big sis and her hubby both have read it and thoroughly enjoyed it. If we don't consider it for January, as I'd like to read that other book that's been suggested, perhaps we can consider it further down the road when another non fiction selection is polled.

Microtrends: The Small Forces Behind Tomorrow's Big Changes
by Mark Penn with E. Kinney Zalesne

From "Soccer Moms," the legendary swing voters of the mid-1990s, to "Late-Breaking Gays" such as former Gov. Games McGreevey (out at age 47), Burson-Marsteller CEO (and campaign adviser to Sen. Hillary Clinton) Penn delves into the ever-splintering societal subsets with which Americans are increasingly identifying, and what they mean. For instance, because of "Extreme Commuters," people who travel more than 90 minutes each way to work, carmakers must come up with ever more luxury seat features, and "fast food restaurants are coming out with whole meals that fit in cup holders." In a chapter titled "Archery Moms?", Penn reports on the "Niching of Sports": much to the consternation of Major League Baseball, "we don't like sports less, we just like little sports more." The net result of all this "niching" is "greater individual satisfaction"; as Penn notes, "not one of the fastest-growing sports in America... depends substantially on teamwork." Penn draws similar lessons in areas of business, culture, technology, diet, politics and education (among other areas), reporting on 70 groups ("Impressionable Elites," "Caffeine Crazies," "Neglected Dads," "Unisexuals," "America's Home-Schooled") while remaining energetic and entertaining throughout. Culture buffs, retailers and especially businesspeople for whom "small is the new big" will value this exercise in nano-sociology.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Postby Ribbons on Wed Dec 12, 2007 10:26 pm

I watched a special about guys like that. It is pretty fascinating, actually. They get paid ridiculous amounts of money to come up with phrases like "climate change." It's also pretty interesting how insidious of an effect these subtle tweaks to the language of media can have on our relationship with the information we receive from it.
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