Page 1 of 1

New James Bond Novel

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:36 pm
by The Todd
The Todd hopes this goes better than the "new" Godfather novel from the Mario Puzo estate.....

Sebastian Faulks has emerged as the author chosen to write a new officially-endorsed James Bond novel.

The British writer - whose books include Birdsong and Charlotte Gray - was commissioned by the Fleming estate last year but his identity kept secret.

Devil May Care is set in "several of the world's most thrilling cities" during the Cold War. The book will be published on 28 May next year to mark the centenary of Sir Ian Fleming's birth.

The Fleming estate announced last year that it had commissioned a "well known and highly respected" writer for the task.

Faulks, 54, said his new book is "about 80% Fleming" and admitted being "surprised" that he was the estate's choice.

He said: "I was surprised but flattered to be asked by the Fleming estate last summer if I would write a one-off Bond book for the Ian Fleming Centenary.

"I told them that I hadn't read the books since the age of 13, but if, when I re-read them, I still enjoyed them and could see how I might be able to do something in the same vein, then I would be happy to consider it.

"On re-reading, I was surprised by how well the books stood up."

He added: "I put this down to three things: the sense of jeopardy Fleming creates about his solitary hero; a certain playfulness in the narrative details; and a crisp, journalistic style that hasn't dated."

Faulks said he attempted to "isolate the most essential and the most enjoyable aspects of the books".

He added: "I found writing this light-hearted book more thrilling than I had expected."

The last of Fleming's 14 books about the secret agent was Octopussy and the Living Daylights, which was published in 1966 - two years after his death.

The first was the 1953 book Casino Royale, made into a film last year with Daniel Craig.

It is not yet known if the new book will be turned into a Bond film.

Corinne Turner, managing director of Ian Fleming Publications, said: "The Fleming family were delighted with the typescript when we received it.

"Sebastian couldn't have written a better book to celebrate Ian's 100th birthday."

Actor and author Charlie Higson was licensed to write books about James Bond's school days. He has so far written four books under the Young Bond banner aimed at younger readers.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:44 pm
by ONeillSG1
Sounds like fun. I hope the author has an original spin to the character to make it fresh, yet keep everything we love about James.

Optimism, my friend. It's contagious.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:12 pm
by DennisMM
In the '80s and '90s, John Gardner wrote more than a dozen Bond novels including Licence Renewed, which was the inspiration in part for the Dalton movie License to Kill. I read the first few and I thought they were quite good.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:17 pm
by The Todd
DennisMM wrote:In the '80s and '90s, John Gardner wrote more than a dozen Bond novels including Licence Renewed, which was the inspiration in part for the Dalton movie License to Kill. I read the first few and I thought they were quite good.


MUCHAS GRACIAS-FIVE!!!!!

I was wondering where License Renewed came from. And it's still a better title than License to Kill for that story.....

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:22 pm
by DennisMM
The movie didn't have much from the book, but there was a small amount.

ETA: A very small amount, I'm embarrassed to say -- as my Wiki checks indicate, mainly the idea of Bond losing his 00 status. Apologies for my poor memory.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:45 pm
by minstrel
I'm of two minds about this sort of thing. On the one hand, I like the idea of new Bond adventures.

But this also seems kinda corpse-rapish. Ian Fleming is dead; it doesn't sit really right with me that others are writing Bond stories, even with the estate's blessing. It's actually worse, because the estate is trying to cash in on more Bond, trying to milk Fleming's corpse dry. (And you should put that image right out of your mind.)

I know it's been done before. People have written Sherlock Holmes stories and so on after the original author is dead - mostly after the original works have passed into public domain. In a couple of decades, I expect a whole new bunch of Lord of the Rings books, and down the road, a bunch of Harry Potter stories written by people who haven't even been born yet.

In a way, it isn't a happy thought.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:54 pm
by DennisMM
With the American initiation of perpetual copyright some years back I don't expect any LOTRs unless the estate licenses them as Fleming's and the publisher did Bond. Potter I can see happening for the next fifty years no matter what Rowling has said about Hallows being the last. If she loves Potter as much as she says and wants to keep making the long green (which even billionaires like), there will be more Potter.

PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:15 am
by Adam Balm
Dennis, get out of my mind man.

Anyway, it's interesting they never mentioned the Young James Bond adventures that they've been putting out in the last few years.

PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:22 am
by The Todd
Adam Balm wrote:Dennis, get out of my mind man.

Anyway, it's interesting they never mentioned the Young James Bond adventures that they've been putting out in the last few years.


I always was under the impression that the Young James Bond adventures were aimed at the pre-teen crowd.

PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:26 am
by The Todd
minstrel wrote:But this also seems kinda corpse-rapish. Ian Fleming is dead; it doesn't sit really right with me that others are writing Bond stories, even with the estate's blessing. It's actually worse, because the estate is trying to cash in on more Bond, trying to milk Fleming's corpse dry. (And you should put that image right out of your mind.)


I can get behind it for two reasons. The obvious being that I love Bond and want to see/read more Bond stories. The other being, people are currently writing stories for characters they didn't create with the still-alive original author's blessing and they are good. A prime example being the latest Bourne books. They are Robert Ludlum's Jason Bourne by Blah Q. Blah. There are plenty of Tom Clancy's Special Ops (etc) written by Joe X. Schmoe. And even some James Patterson books co-written by other people where James Patterson didn't write a word, but created the characters.

Re: New James Bond Novel

PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:36 am
by Seppuku
The Todd wrote:The Todd hopes this goes better than the "new" Godfather novel from the Mario Puzo estate....


The Seppuku unwittingly bought The Godfather Returns, without realising it wasn't written by Mario Puzo. After reading ten pages, The Godfather Returns Returned to his local Borders.

Mark Winegardner- who wrote the Godfather's Revenge/Return- you're nothing to The Seppuku. You're not a writer. Not a tabloid columnist. The Seppuku doesn't want to know you, or what you do.


I'm not the biggest fan of tie-in novels in general. The only ones I ever got into were the Doctor Who ones, some of which were semi-decent. However, the fact that they're reeling-in the guy who wrote Birdsong, which I really liked, means these books might be a cut above the rest. The post-Man With the Golden Gun (Fleming's last Bond novel) movies often really could do with a kick up the arse in the plot department, so if this means we'll get more fodder for the Daniel Craig bond movies, then I'm all for them. Even if the books aren't necessarily that hot, they may still be adapted into great Bond movies.

Re: OLD James Bond Novels

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2012 10:54 pm
by TheButcher
Amazon Acquires License To James Bond Novels For Digital And Print
SEATTLE — Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN) and Ian Fleming Publications Ltd today announced that Amazon Publishing has acquired a ten-year license for North American rights to the entire list of James Bond books by Ian Fleming in print and ebook. Along with the iconic series, Fleming’s two works of non-fiction, consisting of a collection of travel writings called Thrilling Cities (1963) and an exposé of the illegal precious stones trade entitled The Diamond Smugglers (1957), are also included in the agreement. Jonny Geller, Managing Director at Curtis Brown, negotiated the agreement. All of the titles will be reissued by Amazon Publishing’s Thomas & Mercer imprint beginning in summer 2012.

“This deal heralds a new phase in Ian Fleming’s publishing story. We are excited to be working with Amazon in North America to bring a new generation of readers to Ian Fleming’s classic novels.”

“We are excited to be using the opportunity of this re-license to introduce Ian Fleming’s books to a broader audience in the USA, and we believe that Amazon Publishing has the ability to place the books back at the heart of the Bond brand, balancing traditional publishing routes with new technologies and new ways of reaching our readers,” said Corinne Turner, Managing Director of Ian Fleming Publications Ltd.

The agreement for the 14 classic James Bond titles includes the first James Bond book in the series, Casino Royale (1953)—which will celebrate 60 years of publication in 2013—as well as Live and Let Die (1954); Moonraker (1955); Diamonds Are Forever (1956); From Russia with Love (1957); Dr. No (1958); Goldfinger (1959); For your Eyes Only (1960); Thunderball (1961); The Spy Who Loved Me (1962); On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1963); You Only Live Twice (1964); The Man With The Golden Gun (1965) and Octopussy and the Living Daylights (1966). Since their first publication the books have sold over 100 million copies worldwide and have been the inspiration behind the world’s longest-running film franchise. Following Fleming’s death in 1964, Kingsley Amis wrote the next book in the Bond series, Colonel Sun, under the name of Robert Markham. Bond novels have since been written by John Gardner, Raymond Benson, Sebastian Faulks, and Jeffery Deaver.

“We are devoted fans of Fleming’s Bond novels here at Amazon Publishing, and we’re thrilled these books—already known across the world and across generations—will continue to flourish under our Thomas & Mercer imprint,” says Philip Patrick, Director, Business Development, Rights and Licensing. “Amazon Publishing offers signature authors a new life for great backlist titles. Fleming is the perfect fit.”

Geller says, “This deal heralds a new phase in Ian Fleming’s publishing story. We are excited to be working with Amazon in North America to bring a new generation of readers to Ian Fleming’s classic novels.”

This agreement comes on the heels of the announcement last month by The Random House Group that the Bond backlist was returning to its publishing roots in the UK, with Vintage Books (sister imprint of Jonathan Cape, the original publisher of Casino Royale) acquiring a ten-year license for exclusive rights to the Bond novels in the English language with the exception of North America.