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PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2006 2:09 pm
by Bob Samonkey
Right now I am reading Neil Gaiman's Smoke and Mirrors. One of his books of short stories. It is a very fun read. Most of them are very short but are wonderfuly told.

The first one, after the introduction, is about a older woman who purchases the Holy Grail at a local shop and then is visited by someone questing for it.

I always enjoy reading short stories. The ability to draw me in that quickly and tell a whole story delights me.

One of the things I really like about this one is in the introduction, Gaiman does a little director commentary on each one of the stories letting the reader know what was behind it and how it came about.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 8:19 pm
by John Smith
Just finished Reading "American Gods" I didn't like it.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 8:23 pm
by Keepcoolbutcare
John Smith wrote:Just finished Reading "American Gods" I didn't like it.


that's a first.

really, everyone I know who's read it has adored it.

what didn't you like?

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 8:25 pm
by Ribbons
John Smith wrote:Just finished Reading "American Gods" I didn't like it.


Nominating this for Best Review....

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 8:46 pm
by The Garbage Man
John Smith wrote:Just finished Reading "American Gods" I didn't like it.


:(

But... but... gods!

In America!

Doin' stuff!

:(

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 10:03 pm
by minstrel
The Garbage Man wrote:
John Smith wrote:Just finished Reading "American Gods" I didn't like it.


:(

But... but... gods!

In America!

Doin' stuff!

:(


Oh, I don't know. The title just refers to American Gods. Maybe they're not doin' stuff. Maybe they're just sitting around drinking. Maybe that's why he didn't like it.

:)

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 10:27 pm
by Ribbons
"Doin' stuff" makes me think of "Invader Zim".

PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2006 1:43 am
by The Garbage Man
minstrel wrote:Oh, I don't know. The title just refers to American Gods. Maybe they're not doin' stuff. Maybe they're just sitting around drinking. Maybe that's why he didn't like it.

:)


But... but...

Gods drink mead!

That is anachronistically awesome!

Ribbons wrote:"Doin' stuff" makes me think of "Invader Zim".


:D
Have I told you lately that I love you, you Schnapps-nippled hooligan?

PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2006 6:07 am
by John Smith
Keepcoolbutcare wrote:
John Smith wrote:Just finished Reading "American Gods" I didn't like it.


that's a first.

really, everyone I know who's read it has adored it.

what didn't you like?



Well since people want a more in depth review.

Begin Rant:

First in foremost my main complaint would be the utter weakness of the gods. The great build up of a "Storm" led me to believe a mighty battle of cosmic beings was going to take place. This was sooo not the truth. Granted the lack of belief and worship had greatly weakened them but not even the new gods were any better. I mean really the great powers of the old gods were con games and cow killings.

Next, the main Character of Shadow began as an interesting and intelligent man. Only to find out he was a sap. His acceptance to all the strange going on's and people was close to ALF. Granted the author can write his characters any way he likes. But ignoring the big questions is not a good way to address them. Shadow should have been saying WTF is going on.

Third, would be the lousy subplots. Many of the subplot had nothing to do with the characters of the book and took away from the main plot. Did we really need a story about the Jin and his burning Jizz...Come on!!!

Seriously I liked the concept of the book but I thought the Author did a poor job of making the gods. His characters where weak and the story just didn't flow very well. Thats my story and I'm sticking to it.


End Rant. You may begin telling me how wrong I ammmmmmmm....Now!!


If I can recommend to you Jim Butcher's The Dresden files. That is a good series of books.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 10:07 am
by unikrunk
Anansi Boys - Gaiman. So far, it's an okay read; pretty funny. He leans a little heavy on Clive Barker's Imajica type stuff, but, that's okay.

PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:45 pm
by Nachokoolaid
Just a little bump here to ask if anyone has picked up, or read, Gaiman's new book, FRAGILE THINGS?

I asked for it for Christmas, and I'm not looking for spoilers, just some opinions.

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 3:18 pm
by Bob Samonkey
I just finished the graphic novel of Stardust by Neil Gaiman. Before that was Anansi Boys. Thats what I do. i read an author to death. It is my funny little way...

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 3:20 pm
by thebostonlocksmith
I have an annoying habit of doing that, if i read a book and enjoy it then i'll go and buy a load of books by the same author... Tragically, this had led to me buying some absolute shitters...

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 3:24 pm
by so sorry
Bob Poopflingius Maximus wrote:I just finished the graphic novel of Stardust by Neil Gaiman. Before that was Anansi Boys. Thats what I do. i read an author to death. It is my funny little way...


I had a Neil Gaiman biopic-type book in my hand today (the title intrigued me enough to pick it up, Hanging out with the Dream King. I think.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2007 11:47 am
by havocSchultz
Bob Poopflingius Maximus wrote:I just finished the graphic novel of Stardust by Neil Gaiman. Before that was Anansi Boys. Thats what I do. i read an author to death.



Neil Gaiman's dead...?




You bastard!

PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 4:23 pm
by Nachokoolaid
I just finished FRAGILE THINGS by Neil Gaiman. It's a collection of short stories and poems. It was really good, and if you've enjoyed Gaiman's other works, you'll love it. I especially liked "Monarch of the Glen" a Beowulf-esque novella that is a sequel to AMERICAN GODS, a novel that I consider to be one of the best of the last ten years.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 11:30 pm
by Bayouwolf
Just finished "Good Omens" by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett.

Currently looking for a new fix.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 1:55 pm
by Flumm
Free movie!



But beware, it's all in subtitles.

Colon:

Neil Gaiman wrote:
The Birthday Thing

As you may have deduced, it's the blog's 7th birthday today. On February the 9th 2001, I started writing this thing. And now, 1,071,213 words later, it is still going. (Until the wind changes, as Mary Poppins said.)

One thing we've decided to do, as a small celebratory birthday thing is, initially for a month, make a book of mine available online, free, gratis and for nothing.

Which book, though...? Ah, that's up to you.

What I want you to do is think -- not about which of the books below is your favourite, but if you were giving one away to a friend who had never read anything of mine, what would it be? Where would you want them to start?

Click below on the cover of the book you'd like to see out there, online, for free. We'll keep the voting up for a week, and then announce (and Harper Collins will post, to be read) the winning book.



Looks like I shall be reading my first Nail Gaiman book, sooner rather than later...

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 2:11 pm
by Spifftacular SquirrelGirl
It looks like American Gods will be the winner and I can't complain. Really good novel and probably only a matter of time before a talented director makes an unbelieable movie out of it.

Sadly, I guess all I had to do was wait a few years and read it for free instead of paying money for it. Oh well. ;)

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 2:12 pm
by DennisMM
Wish they'd do something less known, like Smoke and Mirrors. More people need to read the short fiction, especially the early short fiction.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 2:15 pm
by Spifftacular SquirrelGirl
DennisMM wrote:Wish they'd do something less known, like Smoke and Mirrors. More people need to read the short fiction, especially the early short fiction.


LOVE Smoke and Mirrors. Still break out and read a few short stories and poems out of it every once in a while.

Nicholas Was... is a must during the holidays. ;)

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 2:15 pm
by Seppuku
And what better book to start with than American Gods? I'd have preferred it if Anansi Boys or Corraline had won, just because I'd get to read something new (not a big re-reader me, you only get so much time in a lifetime...), but I think you should have a pretty enjoyable evening's reading ahead of ya, Flumm.

Has anyone here read The Wolves in the Walls? I bought that as a Christmas present for a little cousin of mine, but I figured I'd show it to her mother first, just in case she'd find it too scary. My aunt took one look at Dave McKean's weird (and beautiful) artwork, and said she didn't want her daughter reading that.

Truth be told, I can almost understand her point. Wolves in the Wall is pretty haunting, but it's the kind of haunting that I personally would have lapped up as a kid. It's probably my favourite thing Gaiman's ever done. If you imagine a Roald Dahl-scripted issue of The Sandman, you'd probably be pretty close to the feel of it.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 2:42 pm
by DennisMM
Spifftacular SquirrelGirl wrote:
DennisMM wrote:Wish they'd do something less known, like Smoke and Mirrors. More people need to read the short fiction, especially the early short fiction.


LOVE Smoke and Mirrors. Still break out and read a few short stories and poems out of it every once in a while.

Nicholas Was... is a must during the holidays. ;)


Actually, I was thinking of Angels and Visitations (which I believe I bought off his table at Chicago way back), though Smoke and Mirrors is excellent. You're a squirrel after my own heart, Spiffy.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 5:27 pm
by papalazeru
I would never post on a book thread ever.

I mean, EVER.

I hardly read. Something to do with with words flaoting in front of my face and the fact that it takes too fucking long to get anywhere.

I tried reading the first 5 Terry Pratchett books. Funny in places (few) but ultimately quite boring.

Yet.....

Good omens is Histerical. I burst out laughing reading that.

That and 'Live from Golgotha' by Gore Vidal.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 7:44 pm
by Nachokoolaid
I just finished INTERWORLD, by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reaves. It doesn't feel much like Gaiman's normal stuff, except for a few parts. But it was still likeable enough. Seemed like it might be a book some folks in the Zone would like.

Here's a brief plot description:

A lad discovers that he can walk between alternate Earths—and is swept up in a war between them in this fast-paced, compulsively readable tale. Joey gets lost in his own house, but when he steps into a patch of fog and finds himself in a world where he died, a trillion Earths lie open to him—arranged in a vast arc, with an empire of science-based planes at one end and a realm where magic rules at the other. Recruited into an army of anything-but-identical Joeys gathered from many of these worlds and charged with maintaining the balance of power, Joey picks up companions both human and non as he travels the multidimensional In Between that links the sprawling "Altiverse." In this first of what could and should be many episodes, Joey finishes his basic training by doing battle with melodramatically evil magic workers Lord Dogknife and Lady Indigo. Vivid, well-imagined settings and characters compensate for weak links in the internal logic of this rousing sf/fantasy hybrid.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 4:18 pm
by Nachokoolaid
Just finished THE GRAVEYARD BOOK by Neil Gaiman. If you're a Gaiman fan, as I suppose many of you are, you'll like this. It's probably the most like his novel NEVERWHERE. It gave me the same sort of bizarre, confused, mystic feeling that Neverwhere gave me. Not his best, but solid. I could see how older children and teens might really like it. It seems like the advertising seems to think so too. Everything says, "From the author of CORALINE" instead of mentioning AMERICAN GODS or NEVERWHERE or any of his other adult novels.

And now I'm reading ABSOLUTE SANDMAN vol. 3. It's not as good as VOL. 1 or 2, but it's damn good.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 6:42 pm
by Maui
Nachokoolaid wrote:Just finished THE GRAVEYARD BOOK by Neil Gaiman. If you're a Gaiman fan, as I suppose many of you are, you'll like this. It's probably the most like his novel NEVERWHERE. It gave me the same sort of bizarre, confused, mystic feeling that Neverwhere gave me. Not his best, but solid. I could see how older children and teens might really like it. It seems like the advertising seems to think so too. Everything says, "From the author of CORALINE" instead of mentioning AMERICAN GODS or NEVERWHERE or any of his other adult novels.

And now I'm reading ABSOLUTE SANDMAN vol. 3. It's not as good as VOL. 1 or 2, but it's damn good.


Curious, is Gaiman being original at all with this story, or does it read too much like The Jungle Book?

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:44 pm
by Nachokoolaid
Maui wrote:
Nachokoolaid wrote:Just finished THE GRAVEYARD BOOK by Neil Gaiman. If you're a Gaiman fan, as I suppose many of you are, you'll like this. It's probably the most like his novel NEVERWHERE. It gave me the same sort of bizarre, confused, mystic feeling that Neverwhere gave me. Not his best, but solid. I could see how older children and teens might really like it. It seems like the advertising seems to think so too. Everything says, "From the author of CORALINE" instead of mentioning AMERICAN GODS or NEVERWHERE or any of his other adult novels.

And now I'm reading ABSOLUTE SANDMAN vol. 3. It's not as good as VOL. 1 or 2, but it's damn good.


Curious, is Gaiman being original at all with this story, or does it read too much like The Jungle Book?


Is it blasphemous to say I haven't read the Jungle Book?

But if you like Gaiman at all, I'd pick it up. It's sort of episodic in a way, looking back on it, almost as if it was written in serial form or something.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:09 pm
by Maui
Nachokoolaid wrote:Is it blasphemous to say I haven't read the Jungle Book?

But if you like Gaiman at all, I'd pick it up. It's sort of episodic in a way, looking back on it, almost as if it was written in serial form or something.


No it's cool, I still haven't read LOTR. :shock:

I'll check it out. I did miss some children's classics growing up - which is why I like to visit the young readers section, check out the books I missed that everyone so dearly loved reading. I did pick up Coraline a few months back, which I enjoyed.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:10 pm
by Nachokoolaid
Maui wrote:
Nachokoolaid wrote:Is it blasphemous to say I haven't read the Jungle Book?

But if you like Gaiman at all, I'd pick it up. It's sort of episodic in a way, looking back on it, almost as if it was written in serial form or something.


No it's cool, I still haven't read LOTR. :shock:

I'll check it out. I did miss some children's classics growing up - which is why I like to visit the young readers section, check out the books I missed that everyone so dearly loved reading. I did pick up Coraline a few months back, which I enjoyed.


If you enjoyed Coraline, I imagine you'll like this. Some parts may be a tad predictable, but I just like spending time in the realities that Gaiman creates.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:13 pm
by Maui
Have you read "American Gods"? I keep hearing good things about this book too.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:22 pm
by Nachokoolaid
Maui wrote:Have you read "American Gods"? I keep hearing good things about this book too.


:D Now you're speaking my language.

A quick question. Do you have any interest in mythologies of various cultures, especially Norse myth? You don't need an understanding of it (although that certainly enriches the read).

If so, AMERICAN GODS will probably be your favorite book ever. As it stands, American Gods is my favorite piece of contemporary literature. I don't want to praise it too highly because it's always hard to live up to hype. But, without a doubt, you should check it out. I know taste in things is totally personal and each person is different, but this book totally clicked with me. I can totally see it being a great film one day. It's very cinematic in terms or theme and structure.

I bought it as a gift to one of my college professors, and everyone I've talked to at least likes it.

Have you read Neverwhere? It's also by Gaiman, and sort of a lead in... in terms of quality. It sort of whet my appetite for American Gods (which I thought was much better).

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:33 pm
by Maui
Nachokoolaid wrote:A quick question. Do you have any interest in mythologies of various cultures


Yes, I do, not Norse specifically though. The last book I read, "The Bone People" (Booker Prize Winner), which I highly recommend, dealt with the myths of the Maori people. A heavy book, deep in symbolism, but it was fantastic. I'll check out "American Gods", it seems you hold it in very high regard.

My book pile continues to grow. *sigh* Note: This is not a problem.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 2:22 am
by Bloo
A couple of things

rer: young adult sections, at my local library they keep GN copies of BATMAN:YEAR ONE and THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS which is where I discovered them years ago and they are still there

re: AMERICAN GODS what a great book, I bought it on the weekend before 9/11 and didn't know what was going on because I was so involved in the book I didn't have the TV or radio on and was clueless until about 8 at night. I need to buy a new copy because that well rerad dogeared copy was loaned to a co-worker who left with it

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 11:02 am
by Maui
Bloo wrote:re: AMERICAN GODS what a great book, I bought it on the weekend before 9/11 and didn't know what was going on because I was so involved in the book I didn't have the TV or radio on and was clueless until about 8 at night. I need to buy a new copy because that well rerad dogeared copy was loaned to a co-worker who left with it


Oooh! More good feedback on "American Gods". Thanks Bloo!

Nacho, forgot to answer your other question, I haven't read "Neverwhere" perhaps I should start with that first as a precursor to "American Gods".

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 3:32 pm
by Nachokoolaid
Maui wrote:
Bloo wrote:re: AMERICAN GODS what a great book, I bought it on the weekend before 9/11 and didn't know what was going on because I was so involved in the book I didn't have the TV or radio on and was clueless until about 8 at night. I need to buy a new copy because that well rerad dogeared copy was loaned to a co-worker who left with it


Oooh! More good feedback on "American Gods". Thanks Bloo!

Nacho, forgot to answer your other question, I haven't read "Neverwhere" perhaps I should start with that first as a precursor to "American Gods".


Not a bad idea. That's how I read them. And one seemed to prepare me for the other. Although they are not necessarily that similar.

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 7:52 pm
by The Todd
Maui wrote:Nacho, forgot to answer your other question, I haven't read "Neverwhere" perhaps I should start with that first as a precursor to "American Gods".


Gaiman-FIVE!!!!!

You should also check out the Neverwhere tele-movie that the Beeb put out with A&E on DVD.

The Todd is still mad the Marquis de Carabas wasn't picked for Doctor Who. Alas...

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:24 am
by Maui
The Todd wrote:
Maui wrote:Nacho, forgot to answer your other question, I haven't read "Neverwhere" perhaps I should start with that first as a precursor to "American Gods".


Gaiman-FIVE!!!!!

You should also check out the Neverwhere tele-movie that the Beeb put out with A&E on DVD.


OK - FIVE!

Re: Neil Gaiman

PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 7:08 am
by TheButcher

Re: How To Talk To Girls At Parties

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 7:29 am
by TheButcher
From The Playlist:
John Cameron Mitchell Talks Animated ‘The Ruined Cast’ & Upcoming Neil Gaiman Adaptation
Drew Taylor wrote:We recently chatted with John Cameron Mitchell about his forthcoming, absolutely dynamite drama “Rabbit Hole,” which is picking up some serious awards season steam (more on that soon). However, the conversation veered into what busy Mitchell has on deck and he updated us on a couple of projects that have been developing recently.

If you’ve seen “Rabbit Hole,” you’ll know that a comic book plays an intriguing part in the film. What you may not know is that it was created by independent writer-artist Dash Shaw (and if you haven’t picked up his mammoth 2008 tome “Bottomless Belly Button,” do yourself a favor and go now. There’s probably a Borders coupon in your mailbox just waiting to be applied.) After Mitchell complimented us on being “the first journalist I’ve talked to who knows him,” he filled us in on an upcoming collaboration between the two.

“I’m actually producing his animated feature now,” Mitchell said. When asked if it was based on either “Bottomless Belly Button” or “BodyWorld,” an online comic that was collected as a book this spring, Mitchell emphatically said, “No.”

“It’s not based on anything. It’s original. It’s called ‘The Ruined Cast.’ It’s going to be 2D. It’s going to be weird, surreal… Well you know his style. I keep comparing it to Philip K. Dick meets ‘The Simpsons.’ And it’s brilliant. He’s gone through all the Sundance labs this year. And I’m producing it with the producer of ‘Shortbus.’ We’re just finishing the script and we’re about to show it to investors, probably at Sundance.”

Mitchell then volunteered details about another project he’s been developing. “I’m also working on something with Neil Gaiman. It’s an adaptation of a short story called ‘How to Talk to Girls At Parties.’ It’s a sort of British, punk-era story that involves an alien girl on her spring break. I’m going to supervise an adaptation with a British writer and eventually direct.”

You can read the short story, which was nominated for all sorts of awards when it was released in 2006, at Neil Gaiman’s website. If “Rabbit Hole” proved anything it is Mitchell’s amazing versatility and range and seeing him dip into the world of Lovecraftian science fiction, wrapped around a period comedy set in 1970s England has us positively giddy. Certainly, plenty of exciting stuff on the way from a director who refuses to be pinned down to any one style.

And in case you missed it, the ever busy Mitchell recently a directed a spot for the latest Lady Dior campaign starring Marion Cotillard. Check it out.

What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 9:17 pm
by justcheckin
I am reading Neverwhere...

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:16 pm
by Nachokoolaid
justcheckin wrote:I am reading Neverwhere...


Good choice. Is this the first time you've read it?

Re: What Are You Reading?

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:22 pm
by justcheckin
Nachokoolaid wrote:
justcheckin wrote:I am reading Neverwhere...


Good choice. Is this the first time you've read it?


Yes, and thanks for moving my post. I had no idea that there was a Gaiman thread. It's petty good so far. I'll post back when I've read more of it and have something to say.

Re: Neil Gaiman’s THE SANDMAN

PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 7:48 pm
by TheButcher
From Collider:
TV Series Adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s THE SANDMAN News [UPDATED]
Update: DC Comics Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns has tweeted a status update on the project. Johns tweets that Gaiman is on board and that development on the series continues. It’s possible that the development simply now continues without Kripke’s participation. Here’s Johns’ tweet:
Correction to world: The Sandman is AWAKE! :) Psyched to be working with @neilhimself on developing one of the greatest series ever!


Re: Neil Gaiman

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 11:09 pm
by Tyrone_Shoelaces

Re:

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2011 6:09 pm
by TheButcher


the view from the ice storm

Neil Gaiman wrote:In case anyone missed it, Terry Jones is adapting GOOD OMENS into a 4 part television series. Details at http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/m ... eil-168792

This is a good thing, and why Terry Pratchett and I were drinking champagne last Septemberish.

I saw a bunch of press about whether there is or isn't a Sandman TV series: as far as I know, nobody has actually optioned SANDMAN as a TV series from DC Comics, who own it. Eric Kripke (of Supernatural fame) pitched his approach to DC and to me last year, and we liked it and we liked him, but it didn't feel quite right at that point, so we passed.

I think that this year the people at DC Comics (and me) will talk to a lot of people who want to make a Sandman TV series, and if we find the perfect person with the perfect way of treating the material, it'll happen. And otherwise it won't.

(Which reminds me: Matt Cheney is still blogging his way through Sandman. He's just reached A Game of You.)


Re: Neil Gaiman

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 7:55 pm
by TheButcher

Re: Neil Gaiman

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:04 am
by Bob Samonkey
I just cannot see that being nearly as fun in movie form... Just cant picture it...

Re: Neil Gaiman

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:48 pm
by justcheckin
TheButcher wrote:Digital Spy Exclusive:
Neil Gaiman confirms 'American Gods' film


Cool... I'm interested in seeing what they do with it. Has anyone figured out who is working on the movie? I think this would be a hard book to adapt or maybe I feel like a good deal of the smaller adventures and characters will be cut out. It could still be really cool.

Re: Neil Gaiman

PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:47 am
by Nachokoolaid
I can't figure out who it is. I'm sure all will be revealed.