The Official Box Office Thread

All the dirt. All the top secret stuff. Anything that has to do with the process of getting us to sit and watch something projected on the big screen.

Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Pacino86845 on Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:51 pm

And Lone Ranger has really taken a pounding.... despite its weak opening (i.e. not a lot of room to fall) it looks like it will have a steep drop this weekend.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby SooperPooperScooper on Sun Jul 14, 2013 3:25 pm

Pacino86845 wrote:And Lone Ranger has really taken a pounding.... despite its weak opening (i.e. not a lot of room to fall) it looks like it will have a steep drop this weekend.


That's 'cos Johnny Depp's a gentleman and undramatic bland actor. 1/2 the people who rate him for being a good actor are women who think he's 'hot'.

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby RogueScribner on Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:24 pm

My eye isn't lazy; it's ambidextrous!
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 01, 2013 4:31 pm

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 01, 2013 4:37 pm


THR:
Steven Spielberg Predicts 'Implosion' of Film Industry
George Lucas echoed Spielberg's sentiments at an event touting the opening of a new USC School of Cinematic Arts building, saying big changes are in store.

Chilli wrote:Image

FORBES: Why Spielberg And Lucas Are Wrong About The Film Industry 'Implosion'
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Re: Hollywood Accounting

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 08, 2013 2:48 am

Isn’t It Time To Take ‘Waterworld’ Off The All-Time Flop List?
MIKE FLEMING JR wrote:In an interview with Deadline last Friday, George Clooney expressed ire for Third Point hedge fund chief Daniel Loeb‘s criticism of Sony Pictures management, claiming Loeb didn’t know the first thing about the movie business. I didn’t have room for it in the article–George covered a lot of ground–but Clooney even criticized Loeb’s choice of historic flops to liken to two Sony summer misfires, After Earth and White House Down. Clooney said that he felt both After Earth (a $130 million budget film that has grossed $242 million worldwide) and White House Down (a $150 million budget film that grossed $117 million worldwide) would not end up as precedent-setting losers when all the money is counted down the line. But he also said that Loeb calling Waterworld, and maybe even Ishtar, all-time flops showed a naivete about the way studios cover their risk. In fairness to Loeb, both Waterworld and Ishtar have been easy targets because their production cost overruns made each big news in its day.

Ishtar cost $55 million and grossed $14 million domestic, and, well it’s tough to put a happy face on that film in any discussion. Clooney and others would argue that Waterworld is a much different story. Now, I can’t count to 20 without taking off my shoes, but an industry numbers cruncher shared with Deadline a cost/profit analysis on Waterworld, even adjusting the numbers for inflation and again to reflect ways that the tent pole business has grown more favorable to studios than back when Waterworld was released in 1995. The numbers make an argument consistent with Clooney’s point.

This insider said that the Waterworld numbers didn’t look that bad on paper back then, and would fare better on the bottom line if made today. Even though production and P&A costs would rise, studios now take advantage of co-financing that not only shares risk but brings a fee around 11%; mature ancillary markets, from DVD to VOD both domestic and especially foreign bring in more money than what back in 1995. Then it was a videocassette marketplace dominated by Blockbuster and other rental stores. Also helping is that actors routinely make breakeven participation deals on tent poles, instead of the high upfront salaries against first dollar gross that was standard for stars like Costner, who could command $10 million against 10% gross. Based on the numbers here, some studios wouldn’t mind having had a Waterworld this summer. Here is how it stacks up:

The left column gives estimates of revenues and costs, and the second column is adjusted for inflation. The third takes into account the changes that favor studios, and push profits to $67 million.

“Why didn’t [Loeb] choose a film like Cutthroat Island or The Adventures Of Pluto Nash,” Clooney asked last week. “It just shows he doesn’t understand the business he is criticizing.” Cutthroat Island, which cost $98 million and grossed $10 million, is a flop for the ages and so is Pluto Nash, which cost $100 million and grossed $4.4 million and $2.6 million foreign.

I covered the twists and turns of Waterworld closely; I recall that the shoot was a nightmare that included losing a set constructed on the water, after a vicious storm. The mission here isn’t to thump Third Point’s Loeb again; he has taken a pounding and seemed conciliatory in an interview yesterday with Deadline’s sister publication, Variety. If nothing else, it seems high time that director Kevin Reynolds and star Kevin Costner have the right to feel vindicated. And money guys might want to find another historic flop to pick on next time.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:32 pm

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Aug 16, 2013 10:28 pm

EMPIRE:
Ten Successful Movies You Thought Were Flops
Slammed by critics, loved by moviegoers...
PHIL DE SEMLYEN wrote:Planet Of The Apes (2001)

Simian baseball, apes skiing, Arnie, Oliver Stone... it’s fair to say that the Planet Of The Apes remake had the sort of fraught evolution that can reduce a slick movie exec to a stooped shell of a man. When it finally arrived on the big screen with Tim Burton at the helm, 13 years after surfacing at Fox and three decades after Charlton Heston first clambered into that space suit, many critics had pens poisoned in readiness. Despite negative reviews focusing on a miscast Mark Wahlberg, a baffling ending and back-story baggage of the kind Johnny Depp claims sank The Lone Ranger, Apes had 2001’s second biggest opening weekend in the US and grossed a worldwide total of $362m. There was even a tie-in comic book and toy line to add to the pot. Not the smash Fox hoped for, but hardly a bomb either.


Men In Black 3 (2012)

There’s a Men In Black 4 in production, so MiB3 must have done reasonably well, right? How well? $624 million well, with the IMAX format coming to the alien-squid-beast party in a big way. Outside the US, MiB3 was the highest grossing of the franchise to date, breaking big in its opening weekends in China ($21 million) and Russia ($16.9 million). Australia, the UK, Brazil, South Korea and Japan kept the Aliens, Smith & Jones gravy train rolling on. But with a production budget of $225 million, a huge marketing spend and Will Smith’s trailer to pay for, it needed those big numbers. Domestic disappointments aside, Sony should be skipping to the bank with those international figures, especially considering that it went into production without a finished script.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Sep 05, 2013 1:43 pm

Summer Box Office Fallout: Studios' New Fear of the $200 Million Tentpole
"The Lone Ranger" and "R.I.P.D." create a new reluctance to bet big on franchises; says producer Joe Roth: "Everyone is trying to get [budgets] down about 20 percent."
Tatiana Siegel & Kim Masters wrote:Call it the summer of the redwood forest -- too many giants planted closely together. The result? Very little sunlight in between. Now, after a season of major would-be franchises falling short -- including Disney's The Lone Ranger, Universal's R.I.P.D. and Sony's After Earth and White House Down -- several industry players say the studios are debating whether to alter their summer strategies.

A source at Warner Bros., for example, says a topic at the studio's annual review meetings is "a sense of budgets creeping up." And producer Joe Roth says in his dealings with the studios, he is encountering new attempts to tighten coffers. "A year ago it was, 'You can do it for $150 million, right?' Today it's, 'You can do it for $125 million, right?' [Everyone is] trying to get it down about 20 percent," he says.

Although the full impact of the summer is not yet clear, a leading talent representative says a trend has emerged: When it comes to launching franchises, studios will pull back on spending.

"There's an Iron Man template," he says. "That initial budget [for the first film] was not crazy-crazy." (The 2008 original was made for about $140 million.) As for sequels, he adds, studios will sharpen their focus on movies that merit big spends and look to save on those that don't.

For example, though Thomas Tull's Legendary Entertainment is committed to tentpoles, the company might have taken a hard lesson from Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim. Legendary, which covered 75 percent of the film's $200 million budget, struggled to crack $100 million domestic without major stars or recognizable branding. In the future, lacking such elements, says a knowledgeable source, Legendary likely would cap the budget at $175 million. Still, the film recovered enough from its poor bow July 12 to cross $400 million worldwide, including $110 million in China. A sequel is not out of the question, albeit at a downsized budget.

Similarly, Paramount is developing a sequel to the Brad Pitt zombie pic World War Z but hopes to hold costs to about $160 million. The original has grossed more than $532 million worldwide, but given its price tag of $250 million or more, it is hardly a profit engine.

Paramount also will look to save money on another Star Trek -- a franchise, but not quite in the top tier. This summer's $190 million production Star Trek Into Darkness has earned over $462 million worldwide; its international haul has exceeded expectations at $234 million, but domestically, its $228.5 million hasn't matched the first film. Whereas the first two were shot in L.A., the next will be filmed in a more tax-friendly location. "We're making it for what it should have been shot for last time if we had made it outside of L.A., which we would have done except that [director J.J. Abrams] didn't want to," says a studio source. "That was a $20 million issue." (Abrams, busy with Star Wars, is unavailable for the third Trek.)

Also looking to save money, Warners will shoot its Superman/Batman pic in Michigan and reap $35 million in incentives. Man of Steel shot in Chicago, California and Vancouver and did not score comparable rebates. The movie has grossed about $657 million worldwide, but like other ventures this summer, its $225 million cost has hampered profitability.

Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan Horn acknowledges that the industry's hard summer has led to "introspection and postpartum discussion." But he says his company won't make policy changes despite a potential $190 million loss imposed by Gore Verbinski's $250 million Lone Ranger.

"We always look at everything," says Horn, whose tenure began after Lone Ranger was greenlighted. "It's ongoing and not particularly affected by whatever succeeds or fails in the marketplace. We do our best to do everything efficiently, [but] we're not saying because of these failures, we're taking $15 million out of the next three pictures or anything like that. I would say we are looking, as we always look, at every film from beginning to end."

Horn declines to address Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean 5, which has not yet been greenlighted. The studio took steps before this summer to control costs by hiring directors Joachim Ronning and Espen Sandberg, who made the adventure film Kon-Tiki on the water for only $15 million. And certainly Disney will look for major deal concessions from star Johnny Depp and producer Jerry Bruckheimer.

But even though negotiations with Bruckheimer will be fierce given friction over Lone Ranger, the all-but-certain outcome is that a deal will be reached -- probably with more generous terms than Disney would like. If franchises are split into two groups -- the greater and lesser -- then Pirates is in the first tier, with the most recent installment grossing more than $1 billion worldwide in 2011. (A report that Bruckheimer will lose final cut is false. He long has had that power on his Disney films but never has exercised it. On Lone Ranger, he and Verbinski lost final cut because of budget overruns, but Disney did not impose its will despite wanting to trim the film.)

Tightening budgets might help studios hedge their bets, but given an already full pipeline, another problem this summer -- overcrowding -- won't be addressed for some time. "The summer season now starts in early May, and I think we have seen audience fatigue set in come July and August," says Sony's Doug Belgrad, whose late-summer Elysium has underperformed. (This Is the End, Grown Ups 2 and Smurfs 2 have turned a profit.) "It requires us to be thoughtful about when we release our films."

Budgets and competition are major challenges, but observers say the biggest issue is quality.

"This summer proved that scale and spectacle alone won't suffice," says Fox film chief Jim Gianopulos, who has committed to spending $150 million on next summer's biblical epic Exodus, from Ridley Scott, and nearly $200 million on X-Men: Days of Future Past. "Movies need originality and compelling stories and characters. Pure tonnage of effects is not going to cut it."
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheBaxter on Thu Sep 05, 2013 1:56 pm

here's a tip for the studios: instead of spending bazillions of dollars on cgi effects, and paying big-name acters multimillion dollar deals, try working on the SCRIPTS. it doesn't cost a lot of money to write a good script. and when you get one, don't hack it all to pieces and turn it into something unrecognizable because you think you need to appeal more to women or teenage boys or whatever demographic you think you need to bring in. and don't hire some egotistical star who will hack it all to pieces either. find a good script or hire someone to write one, and when you get one, give it to a good director and then leave them alone to make the damn movie. that's how good movies used to get made.


and while you're at it, GET OFF MY LAWN YOU DAMN KIDS!!!!
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby RogueScribner on Thu Sep 05, 2013 2:23 pm

How many movies this summer upped the "excitement" by showing building after building falling down or getting crashed into? Just because you CAN do something, doesn't mean you SHOULD. Empty spectacle is boring. Make it mean something.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Lord Voldemoo on Thu Sep 05, 2013 4:19 pm

RogueScribner wrote:How many movies this summer upped the "excitement" by showing building after building falling down or getting crashed into? Just because you CAN do something, doesn't mean you SHOULD. Empty spectacle is boring. Make it mean something.


Empty spectacle doesn't mean anything, but it can be entertaining. See for e.g., Avatar. There was virtually nothing original about the story or script. The writing didn't stand out in any way, nor did the direction or performances. The imagery, CGI and 3D is what made that movie mildly entertaining.

But the problem is: spectacle isn't spectacle any more. Buildings falling: seen it. Planets exploding: seen it. Amazing 3D: seen it. CGI "actors": seen it. Virtually seamless transition between human performances/practical effects and CGI: seen it. 48 fps: seen it. blahblahblah: seen it.

If you're going to base a film on spectacle, as Cameron did, it had damned well better be groundbreaking. Good, fun movies can be good and fun for a lot of different reasons. Script, performance, direction, concept, theme, originality, plot twists, music, source material and, yes, the quality or excitement of the imagery. But, in an age where CGI actors can be made real and the landscape is the director's plaything, if all you have is imagery you'd better bring something novel to the table.

I agree, though, that just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD. It also doesn't mean you shouldn't. It just means that the ability to do something with CGI, in and of itself, doesn't really matter anymore.

I'm holding out for Smell-o-vision.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby RogueScribner on Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:01 pm

I'd like Feel-O-Vision so I can literally get fucked by a bad movie!!!
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Spandau Belly on Fri Sep 06, 2013 7:36 am

I think a lot of factors contribute to the box office success of a summer blockbuster film, however I think the quality of the film itself is probably one of the least important. For details, see the career of Michael Bay. I think a good script that tells a logical, compelling story and endears the characters to the audience pays off, but more in the long run. Good word of mouth probably contributes more to the secondary markets like video. If people really like a movie in cinemas, they will be more likely to buy the DVD and they will anticipate any sequel with greater enthusiasm. But for that initial success in cinemas, people see a movie because they have a basic interest in the subject/genre, like the talent (usually the actors) involved, and have been sold on it by the marketing campaign.

So from a business perspective, the studios' attitude of trying to deliver the same quality of product but for a lower cost by filming in locations that offer tax breaks is pretty hard to argue with. If the demand remains consistent, then delivering the same product with a lower cost of production will inaruguably increase their net profit.

But I too would like better written movies.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Sep 19, 2013 9:01 pm

Variety August 8, 2011:
Disney exec: Studios should lean on tentpoles
“People say ‘It’s all about the story,’” Hendrickson said. “When you’re making tentpole films, bullshit.” Hendrickson showed a chart of the top 12 all-time domestic grossers, and noted every one is a spectacle film. Of his own studio’s “Alice in Wonderland,” which is on the list, he said: “The story isn’t very good, but visual spectacle brought people in droves. And Johnny Depp didn’t hurt.”

Visual spectacle, he said, drives attendance in a film’s first few weekends. And unlike years past when a movie like “The Lion King” might stay in theaters as long as a year, almost all movies are out of theaters quickly now. “Once you’re out of theaters your maximum profit potential is over,” he said.

Where is Andy Hendrickson now?
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Lord Voldemoo on Sun Nov 10, 2013 9:58 pm

Thor 2 opened to almost $90 million this weekend. That's nearly 40% more than the first film. That's a 327 million gross worldwide to date.

Granted there wasn't much competition, but holy hell. Avengers has some long term goodwill. I'm buying more disney stock.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby minstrel on Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:21 pm

Yeah, the marketing synergy is amazing with these Marvel films. The first Iron Man, Thor, and Captain America films served as great promotion for the Avengers, and now the Avengers is promoting the next wave of the individual films. It's getting double or triple value out of your promotional buck. Disney is laughing all the way to the bank.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Mon Nov 11, 2013 5:12 am

Post-’Avengers’ Effect: How ‘Thor: The Dark World’ Leveraged Marvel Heritage
Sequel saw a 31% larger domestic opening than its 2011 predecessor
Andrew Stewart wrote:As if there was ever any doubt, this weekend’s colossal “Thor: The Dark World” box office performance lays to rest one thing: the Disney-Marvel machine works.

The $86 million domestic opening — more than $20 million more than its predecessor’s summertime bow — for “Thor: The Dark World” is a byproduct of the massive popularity of the Marvel brand and its characters; but namely, those featured in “The Avengers,” which stands as the industry’s third-highest grossing film of all time at $1.5 billion worldwide.

Globally, “Thor: The Dark World” has cumed $327 million in just two weeks, compared with the first “Thor” (2011), which amassed an almost $450 million worldwide total.

The “Avengers”-effect reaches beyond just the hammer-wielding god in “Thor” — it also has strengthened the mettle of the “Iron Man” franchise.

“Iron Man 3,” at $1.215 billion globally, the fifth-largest cume ever (and this year’s No. 1 pic), marks a remarkable 95% increase over “Iron Man 2,” which grossed $624 million worldwide in 2010. That kind of sequel-to-three-quel improvement is unrivaled so far in the Marvel world: for instance, Sony’s “Spider-Man 3″ (2007) grew 14% over its 2004 predecessor, while Fox’s “X-Men: The Last Stand” (2006) saw a comparable 13% increase over “X-2: X-Men United,” which was released in 2003.

Aside from being “Avengers” siblings, “Iron Man 3″ and “Thor: The Dark World,” which had a 31% larger domestic opening than the original, benefit huge growth in the international marketplace.

This weekend, “The Dark World” collected $19.6 million in China in three days, surpassing the entire gross of the original “Thor” on the mainland. (A growing Chinese infrastructure also plays a lot into the overperformance.)

“The Marvel guys are so fucking smart,” enthused one industry executive Sunday morning. “I don’t think anyone is as smart as them in the industry.”

The popularity of the Marvel brand has extended beyond fanboys to become an event for families, as well.

Although Tony Stark as Iron Man ultimately has more clout with audiences than Thor does, the success of the post-”Avengers” sequels regardless is very good news for another member of the team — Captain America.

The original stars n’ stripes Avenger pic — which was the last Marvel film to be distributed by Paramount — raked in more than $370 million worldwide, which was less than “Thor” (the penultimate Par-distributed Marvel pic) but more than the original “X-Men,” at 296 million globally.

Disney launches “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” on April 4; the “Avengers” sequel, “Age of Ultron,” bows May 1, 2015.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 27, 2013 4:50 am

Keanu Reeves’ ‘47 Ronin’ Bombing: Universal Prepares for Major Loss
Dave McNary wrote:Universal Pictures has acknowledged that “47 Ronin” is a loser, disclosing that it’s taken the ususual step of writing down some if its $175 million cost prior to the current quarter.

Domestically, “47 Ronin” is projected to earn under $20 million through Sunday — the worst debut for a $150 million-plus movie in 2013.
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2 0 1 5

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:32 pm

Best Box Office Ever? Biggest Hollywood Franchises Explode In 2015 On Historic Collision Course
ANITA BUSCH wrote:In 2011, Iron Man (I and II) director Jon Favreau called the summer of 2011, “a bloodbath for Hollywood” because of the number big-budget special effects films, remakes and sequels. Pfft! Wait until you get a load of next year. The amount of big-budget sequel fare and remakes set for 2015 from the major studios is mind-boggling and add to that highly anticipated films such as Fifty Shades Of Grey and another Quentin Tarantino film in the same year and you have all the makings for the biggest movie going year in history. The year is even going to start out hitting the ground running with audience-familiar titles, but it the summer and holiday season of 2015 that will be packed like no other — which brings up serious questions about what will happen as some of the biggest franchises in history collide? Remember, these films need major market exposure on over 2,500-3,000 screens or more to open big and some of them hope to play for weeks. This is going to be a star-studded war. I guess it was inevitable when studios ride out the franchises as far as they do now … what are we on Mission: Impossible 5 and Fast & Furious 7 now? And we have another Star Wars on our hands.

The year 2015 will go down in the books as the World Cup of franchise players: Superman v. Batman v Avengers v Mad Max v Fast and Furious v Jurassic Park v Terminator v Fantastic Four 3D, Marvel’s Ant-Man v Assassins vs Untitled Bourne Identity, and then Bond v Star Wars v Hunger Games: Mockingjay (2) v Mission Impossible for top film of the year. In kid fare, parents should be ready to be pulled to the theater time and time again (sacrificing much-needed sleep) with Cinderella, Monster Trucks, The Penguins Of Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda 3, The Jungle Book, Alvin And The Chipmunks 4, Peanuts, Smurf 3, Tomorrowland, and SpongeBob 2. Practically every genre in 2015 is looking at proven titles: The year will start with the typical early year horror film fare — again no stopping franchise names — Amityville from Dimension and Frankenstein starring Daniel Radcliffe both in January, and Friday the 13th and Poltergeist. That will be followed by Fifty Shades Of Grey based on the bestselling book of the same name by E.L. James which bows in February before the floodgates open again on sequels and remakes.

The plethora of franchise titles will likely push the 2015 box office to record-breaking heights as this year’s holdovers from the Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday fare — such as The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 (which bows on November 21), Fox’s Night At The Museum 3 and Sony’s Annie and Warner Bros’ The Hobbit: There And Back Again (or should it be called The Hobbit: Here It Comes Again) will also add to the huge overall gross numbers of 2015.

“This is the box office equivalent of the hundred-year flood,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for Rentrak. “What’s going to have to happen is that the marketplace is going to have to expand to accommodate these films, and if it doesn’t, there will be films that get left out in the cold. These are all the top titles of these various franchises so they are required viewing for fans. You have James Bond, Hunger Games, Star Wars, Terminator, Mission: Impossible, Fast & Furious, The Avengers – the likes of which I have never seen in my career of over 20 years.” And I’ll add to that, Superman v Batman and Marvel’s Ant-Man — I haven’t seen anything like it either. And I didn’t include titles from Michael Mann or Tarantino, Snow White And The Hunstman 2 or the next Dwayne Johnson film. There, I just did.

Marvel’s The Avengers had the biggest opening weekend of all time with $207.4M in the first weekend of May 2012 and they are going out on the same release date next year. Even one of these franchise properties can suck all the air out of the box office weekend, but in 2015, it will be a battle to breathe. ”Everyone is staying away from Avengers,” said one distribution exec at a major studio. “Everyone’s looking at what are the pictures you need to avoid. Some of these pictures will open huge and then burn. They won’t get the same multiples the previous ones did. Some of them will burn quicker. It’s going to be tricky to navigate through those waters. It’s pretty crazy, there’s no doubt about it.”

the-hobbit-an-unexpected-journeyStudio distribution executives will continue to change dates and jockey throughout the year. Who will blink? Fox did yesterday, running away from Fifty Shades Of Grey with its romancer The Longest Ride … but then dropped in MGM’s Poltergiest to compete for moviegoers on the year’s biggest date night of Valentine’s Day which falls on a Saturday this year. It also moved Night At The Museum 3 up a week and it now goes out on the same date as The Hobbit: There And Back Again.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jan 18, 2014 5:01 am

'Man of Steel' breaks June US box office record - top 10 in full
According to The Hollywood Reporter, the film has nabbed the number one June movie opening of all time with $113m on its weekend debut.


Batman-Superman Movie Bumped to 2016, Sets Up Marvel Showdown
Borys Kit wrote:Batman-Superman is the high-profile follow-up to last summer's Man of Steel, which grossed $668 million worldwide and rebooted the Superman franchise for Warner Bros.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby so sorry on Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:54 pm

Disney's Frozen become highest grossing animated film of all time

Just passed a billion worldwide, and jumped into the #10 spot for highest grossing films ever.

And in related news, the So Sorry family had a successful Frozen-themed 8 year old birthday party this weekend. What's more mind numbing then listening to your two daughters sing Let It Go for the 2 zillionth time? Listening to 12 girls sing Let It Go for the 2 zillionth and one time.
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Re: Frozen 2

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 05, 2014 10:10 am

so sorry wrote:Disney's Frozen become highest grossing animated film of all time

Just passed a billion worldwide, and jumped into the #10 spot for highest grossing films ever.

And in related news, the So Sorry family had a successful Frozen-themed 8 year old birthday party this weekend. What's more mind numbing then listening to your two daughters sing Let It Go for the 2 zillionth time? Listening to 12 girls sing Let It Go for the 2 zillionth and one time.

Jennifer Lee & Chris Buck interview: Frozen, Statham, Frozen 2
We're past the age of straight to DVD sequels now, that much is thankfully clear. And obviously there's been talk about sequels to this, a musical... but how closely do you stay now as guardians of it? How do you stop The Jungle Book 2 happening to it? How do you protect these characters, or do you have to accept that it's someone else's now?

Jennifer: We might have different answers because you've had some distance from films before? [Chris wasn't involved in the Tarzan spin-offs]

Chris: Yeah, but those were different regimes. I think with John Lasseter being there, he's such a guardian of the movies now... especially of Frozen, he really was such a big part of it. And the characters too. I think we'll be right there, but he's the 800 pound gorilla who says no, our characters don't do this. They don't go there.

Jennifer: Right now, I certainly feel very protective of the characters, and it'd be very hard to see that happen. Having said that, the fans have seen different things in the film, some of which wasn't our intention, but they're responding to it, and there's a discourse going on.

There really is.

Jennifer: It's flattering. They're talking about our film at a deeper level than just it was good, it was bad. And that in itself means a lot. You don't want to take that away from fans. There is that balance of wanting to stay involved and protecting the characters, certainly going forward, but also liking the world that each person is making.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Apr 11, 2014 7:51 am

Summer movie sequels equal profits for Hollywood studios
Lisa Richwine wrote:(Reuters) - Captain America, Spider-Man, the X-Men and Transformers are storming back into movie theaters, returning in sequels to save the world from mass destruction, while at the same time churning out profits for movie studios.

Hollywood will pack 13 sequels into theaters over the next 20 weeks. The parade begins on Friday, when Captain America dons his red-white-and-blue superhero suit for the U.S. debut of Marvel's "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," and continues through summer, Hollywood's most lucrative season.

Studios generally don't have to spend as much to raise awareness of sequels months in advance, as they do with other big-budget films, executives say. And when sequels reach the big screen, ticket sales in foreign markets, which can account for up to 80 percent of a film's box office, often exceed their predecessors.

"When you can say, here's 'Avatar 2,' and you've got six billion people ready to see it, it doesn't take a lot of marketing to get them into the theater," said Jim Gianopulos, chairman and chief executive of Fox Filmed Entertainment. "It's a self-propelling marketing message in a very big world."

The first installment of 20th Century Fox's animated "Ice Age" series took in $207 million overseas in 2002. The fourth "Ice Age" from the studio owned by Twenty-First Century Fox earned $716 million at international box offices in 2012.

Sequels are hardly a new Hollywood phenomenon. But in recent years, as DVD sales crumbled, movie studios began to cut back on the numbers of films they produced to trim the risks.

Starting in 2008, they began to churn out more sequels and big-budget event films, turning away from riskier original films like independent dramas and romantic comedies.

This year's sequels include superhero films "The Amazing Spider-Man 2" from Sony Corp, Fox's "X-Men: Days of Future Past," and "Transformers: Age of Extinction" from Viacom Inc's Paramount; animated movies "Rio 2" from Fox and Dreamworks Animation's "How to Train Your Dragon 2;" and Sony comedies "22 Jump Street" and "Think Like a Man Too."

What mostly drives the studio top brass is that audiences keep buying tickets for sequels. In 2013, nine of the top 12 films in the U.S. and Canada were sequels or prequels, including Marvel's "Iron Man 3" and Lions Gate's "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire." Those films generated $2.6 billion in domestic ticket sales, nearly one-quarter of the year's $10.9 billion total, and another $4.5 billion worldwide.

That shift away from riskier films has helped studios increase or stabilize their profits, said Janney Montgomery Scott analyst Tony Wible.

Operating margins at Time Warner Inc's Warner Bros., the studio behind the "Harry Potter" franchise and "The Dark Knight" Batman series, hovered around 7 percent in 2007 and 2008, Wible said, before rising to about 10 percent for each of the next five years.

At Walt Disney Co, the focus is on a smaller number of films with the potential to produce sequels, drive toy sales and inspire theme-park rides.

In a typical year, Disney is aiming to release one film each from Pixar, Disney Animation, and "Star Wars" producer Lucasfilm; two from Marvel, and four to six from its Disney live action division, said Alan Horn, chairman of The Walt Disney Studios. "We choose our sequels carefully," Horn said. "If we have a picture that has earned a right to have a sequel, it's because the audiences loved it."

Next year's crop of sequels may set even bigger records. Studios are already planning to release new installments of some of the biggest films of all time, including "Star Wars," "Jurassic Park" and "Marvel's The Avengers."

The rash of sequels has prompted even filmmakers to make fun of their world. In the opening number for "Muppets Most Wanted," Disney's sequel to its 2011 "The Muppets" movie, the furry puppets break into a song called "We're Doing a Sequel."

"That's what we do in Hollywood," the puppets sing, "and everybody knows that the sequel's never quite as good."

(Reporting by Lisa Richwine; Editing by Ronald Grover and Kenneth Maxwell)
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 01, 2014 1:13 am

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 15, 2014 1:04 pm

Box Office Preview: 'Godzilla' Hopes to Scale $65 Million Debut
egendary Pictures and partner Warner Bros. hope to launch a new franchise based around the iconic giant lizard
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 17, 2014 12:20 pm

THR:
Box Office: 'Godzilla' Stomps Toward $100 Million Domestic Debut
The summer's second tentpole took in a whopping $38.5 million on Friday, the biggest day of the year so far.
Pamela McClintock wrote:If traffic holds, the Legendary Pictures and Warner Bros. tentpole could best the $95 million debut of Captain America: The Winter Soldier and the $91.6 million opening of The Amazing Spider-Man 2. Godzilla, earning a B+ CinemaScore, is doing especially strong business in Imax theaters, which generated $6.1 million in Friday ticket sales.

Pre-release tracking had suggested that Godzilla would reach $65 million in its domestic launch.


DEADLINE:
BOX OFFICE: ‘Godzilla’ Crushes It: $98M+

VARIETY:
‘Godzilla’ Crushes Box Office With Largest Opening Day of Year, Set for $98 Million Weekend
Maane Khatchatourian wrote:The King of the Monsters is also king of the box office.

“Godzilla” obliterated the competition with a $38.5 million Stateside opening on Friday, the largest debut day of the year. This includes $9.3 million from Thursday night screenings. At $6.2 million, the creature feature also earned 2014′s biggest Imax opening.

The Warner Bros.-Legendary Pictures reboot of the Japanese classic is on track for a much-higher-than-anticipated $98 million this weekend, which would be the best opening of the year so far.

This also means the tentpole could top the openings of “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and “The Amazing Spider-Man 2,” which launched to $95 million and $91.6 million, respectively.

If that figure holds, it will also mark the highest grossing debut for a monster movie to date, ahead of the last record holder, “The Lost World: Jurassic Park,” which opened to $72 million in 1997.

Gareth Edwards’ “Godzilla” is undoing the damage done by Sony’s 1998 big-budget disaster. Roland Emmerich’s pic starring Matthew Broderick opened to lackluster reviews and grossed only $6 million more Stateside than its $130 million production budget (it hauled $380 million worldwide). In fact, the last three Godzilla movies have flopped domestically, with “Godzilla 1985” grossing $4 million and “Godzilla 2000” making $10 million.

“Godzilla” had also grossed $20 million from more than 30 markets on Thursday, including $2 million in the U.K. from sneak screenings, $1.7 million in Russia and $1.4 million in Mexico. It opened in 64 international territories on Friday.

The $160 million blockbuster is the last film that WB is co-financing with Legendary — its producing partner of eight years. “Godzilla” is their first big-budget collaboration following last summer’s mixed bag “Pacific Rim.”

Legendary, which financed 75% of “Godzilla,” looks to be turning a new leaf following its recent trouble with the monster genre at the U.S. box office. “Pacific Rim’s” meager takings (it made $102 million domestic on a $190 million production budget) followed Bryan Singer’s “Jack the Giant Slayer” disappointment, another WB release.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sun May 18, 2014 4:39 pm

Box Office: 'Godzilla' Opens to Monstrous $93.2 Million in North America
The summer's second tentpole -- likely launching a new Hollywood franchise -- opens to $103 million overseas for a global total of $196.2 million
Pamela McClintock wrote:Gareth Edwards' Godzilla debuted to a monstrous $93.2 million from 3,952 theaters at the domestic box office, giving the iconic giant lizard a new lease on life and delivering the second-best opening of the year.

Overseas, the $160 million movie debuted to $103 million from 64 markets for a global total of $196.2 million for Legendary Pictures and Warner Bros.

Godzilla was so strong on Friday in North America that some box office observers believed it could approach $98 million for the weekend. Either way, the movie's debut far exceeded expectations. Males fueled the film (58 percent), and especially younger males, a demo that is harder and harder to lure to the multiplex.

Overall, 40 percent of ticket buyers were under the age of 40. While Godzilla received a B+ CinemaScore overall, the younger demo gave it an A CinemaScore.

Marking the summer's second tentpole, Godzilla delivered the second-best opening of the year so far after Captain America: The Winter Soldier ($95 million) and bested the $91.6 million opening of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 two weeks ago.

The $160 million movie did especially strong business in fanboy friendly Imax theaters, which turned in 15 percent of the overall gross with $13.5 million from 352 locations, putting the theater average at a stellar $40,057. And more than half of the movie's earnings came from 3D locations, an especially strong showing.

Godzilla, finally launching a Hollywood studio franchise headlined by the giant lizard, is a defining moment for Legendary Pictures, which spearheaded the reboot. Thomas Tull's Legendary financed 75 percent of Godzilla, with Warner Bros. putting up the rest of the money.

"Thomas Tull and his team did an incredible job and have delivered a new franchise," said Warners president of domestic distribution Dan Fellman.

Legendary no longer has a first-look deal with Warners -- it is now Universal's partner -- but the two companies will team on any further Godzilla movies, insiders say, adding that a sequel is already in the works.

"The tone of the movie was effectively communicated through the marketing," said Jon Jashni, Legendary's president and chief creative officer (Legendary and Warners worked on the campaign in tandem). Regarding a sequel, Jashni said Legendary will have to wait and see how this movie holds up.

One challenge will be X-Men: Days of Future Past, which opens next weekend.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed May 21, 2014 4:49 pm

Box-Office Analyst Predicts Hits and Flops of Summer 2014
Doug Creutz, who has proved prescient (he foresaw "Godzilla's" success), weighs in on the fates of movies including the fourth "Transformers" (huge!) and the Wachowskis' "Jupiter Ascending" (flop!).
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed May 21, 2014 11:37 pm

Box Office: ‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’ to Rule Memorial Weekend With $100-Million Plus
Brent Lang wrote:Last weekend’s box office heavyweight “Godzilla” won’t suffer the steep drop-off usually associated with tentpole films in their second week of release and may be the biggest factor in preventing “X-Men: Days of Future Past” from hitting a franchise-best debut. The picture should gross just shy of $50 million over the four-day period, a 47 % shave from last weekend’s $93 million opening. It will pass the $300 million mark worldwide when the weekend comes to a close. With a break-even point of $380 million, “Godzilla” is nearly assured profitability, setting the stage for sequels to come.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheBaxter on Thu May 22, 2014 10:19 am

TheButcher wrote:Box-Office Analyst Predicts Hits and Flops of Summer 2014
Doug Creutz, who has proved prescient (he foresaw "Godzilla's" success), weighs in on the fates of movies including the fourth "Transformers" (huge!) and the Wachowskis' "Jupiter Ascending" (flop!).


apparently he doesn't give Guardians of the Galaxy much of a shot either.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Al Shut on Fri May 23, 2014 1:16 pm

Does he predict the world cup?
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 11, 2014 1:15 pm

Box Office Mojo
God's Not Dead
Domestic Total as of Jun. 10, 2014: $60,105,954
Production Budget: $2 million

The Wrap April 7, 2014:
‘God's Not Dead’ Isn't Going Away, and Neither Are Faith-Based Films
Todd Cunningham wrote:To put “God's Not Dead” in perspective, the Biblical epic “Noah” finished third this weekend with $17 million, a 61 percent fall off from its No. 1 opening last weekend. To be fair, Darren Aronofsky's effects-laden take on the Old Testament is targeting a much broader — and global — audience via Paramount. It's taken in $72.5 million domestically so far, which means it will probably hit $100 million, and it's already passed $106 million abroad.

But its production budget was $125 million, while “God's Not Dead” was $5 million. That's apples and oranges to be sure, but in terms of return on investment, David's looking better than Goliath at this point.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Mon Jun 16, 2014 5:17 am

Box Office Summer Sequelitis: #1 ‘22 Jump St’ $60M, #2 ‘How To Train Your Dragon 2’ $50M
Nikki Finke wrote:#2 is PG-rated and 3D How To Train Your Dragon 2 howtotrainyourdragon2(DreamWorks Animation/Fox- 4,253 theaters) targeting $18.5M Friday but -9% on Saturday. With a 3x multiple (on the high end for summer) that’s a tepid $50M. The cost was a whopping $145M to make. After an uneven string of misses and miserable grosses recently culminating in the bomb that was Mr Peabody And Sherman, this sequel should have been Jeffrey Katzenberg’s biggest toon opening since 2012′s Madagascar 3. (The first Dragon opened to $43.7M and was considered one of DWA’s quality films.) But DreamWorks Animation is still nowhere near its Shrek highs. Audiences gave the sequel an A Cinemascore which will help word-of-mouth.





Box Office: ’22 Jump Street’ Tops ‘How to Train Your Dragon 2′ With $60 Mil
Brent Lang wrote:“How to Train Your Dragon 2″ nipped at Hill and Tatum’s heels, soaring to $50 million across 4,235 locations.

“It’s extraordinary to have two films open to $50 million on the same weekend,” said Chris Aronson, Twentieth Century Fox domestic distribution chief. “Any time you have a PG animated film opening against an R-rated comedy, that’s the kind of competitve environment you’re looking for.”

Going into the weekend, most analysts predicted that the DreamWorks Animation film would be the highest-grossing film at the paternal appreciation day box office, but “22 Jump Street” was able to offer up enough pop culture references and rowdy hijinks to bring in older audiences. It also didn’t deviate from the formula that made “21 Jump Street” a standout in 2012, bringing back not only the stars, but directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller.


“How to Train Your Dragon 2″ cost $145 million to produce and was distributed by 20th Century Fox as part of a pact with DreamWorks Animation. Going into the weekend, it maintained a slight lead in pre-sales and though it fell behind “22 Jump Street,” analysts predict it will benefit from a lack of family fare at the multiplexes.

“You’ll see this movie hold up really well in the weeks to come,” said Phil Contrino, vice president and chief analyst at BoxOffice.com. “It’s going to have the market largely to itself until the middle of July when ['Planes: Fire & Rescue'] opens.”

The film eclipsed the first “Dragon’s” $43.7 million bow, and skewed female, 53% to 47%. 56% of the audience was under 25 years old.



Weekend Report: 'Jump Street' Sequel Scores, 'Dragon' Disappoints
Ray Subers wrote:In second place, DreamWorks Animation's How to Train Your Dragon 2 opened to an estimated $50 million. That's an improvement over the first movie's $43.7 million, though it's far from the type of gain expected given the fact that the first Dragon is only of the most beloved animated movies of the past decade. It's also the first June animated release to fall short of $60 million since Ratatouille opened to $47 million back in 2007.

There are likely a few reasons behind Dragon's lackluster debut. First, the movie's marketing positioned it as a dramatic action/adventure, while only hinting at the movie's humor. Historically, the most successful animated movies put laughs first and story second. This calls to mind action-heavy DreamWorks Animation sequel Kung Fu Panda 2, which was unable to leverage goodwill from the first movie in to any kind of sequel bump (it ultimately earned much less than its predecessor).

Another factor is the four-year gap between movies. While audiences loved the first movie at the time, the excitement has surely died down a bit during the long wait. The brand did stay active during that time thanks to the DreamWorks' Dragons show, though that also may have reduced the must-see factor for the big-screen follow-up (if you're seeing these characters for free on TV, is the movie worth the ticket price?).

Dragon's audience was 53 percent female and 56 percent under the age of 25. They awarded it a strong "A" CinemaScore. The movie faces very little competition for the remainder of Summer, and will certainly hold up well in the long run. It's unlikely, though, that it comes anywhere close to matching its predecessor's $218 million.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jul 16, 2014 5:31 pm

Box-Office Woes: Age and Gender Gap Helping Fuel Summer Decline
The new rule? Women are dependable, while men and younger moviegoers aren't.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jul 17, 2014 6:12 am

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sun Aug 24, 2014 7:18 pm

Deadline:
Movie Tracking In The Toilet: Fix Or Flush?
Anita Busch wrote:The studios pay millions of dollars a year for solid tracking information so they can figure out how to spend their media. Guess what? The tracking ain’t working. It isn’t reliable. It’s off by millions. So the studios are, basically, basing their media buys on pure crap info. Millions and millions more dollars are being flushed in media buys. Great news for shareholders, eh?

And it’s affecting everything. Not only do tracking numbers affect how studios spend on marketing, but they are also looking at those numbers to help determine what kind of genre projects to greenlight. They are hiring directors and writers based on what looks likely to be successful.




In Deadline’s box-office reports, we strive to look at pictures on the basis of profitability. It’s why we look for real budget numbers for analysis. If we don’t have time or cannot find them, we let you know when it is a studio-claimed number.

Here’s the rub: Budget numbers are often fudged as are marketing and distribution costs — all of it is done in the hope of hiding the perceived or real failures — so it takes digging. Both domestic and international box office are a film’s main revenue streams, and certainly are the best bet at recouping production, marketing and distribution costs, but there are other revenue streams as well.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 11, 2014 12:33 am

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby RogueScribner on Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:24 pm

First Robin Williams, then Joan Rivers, now Box Office Mojo. :P
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Ribbons on Sat Oct 11, 2014 11:07 pm

They always say bad things come in threes
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 11, 2014 11:18 pm

Box Office Mojo Returns After Disappearing Friday
BoxOfficeMojo.com is back in action
:D
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Lord Voldemoo on Mon Oct 13, 2014 1:24 pm

I was fully prepared to scream at my brother about this (works for IMDB/Amazon). I love Box Office Mojo. So glad it's back.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Nov 08, 2014 8:06 am

‘Big Hero 6′ Looks To Eclipse ‘Interstellar’ As Box Office Enters Weekend Sprint
Scott Bowles and Anita Busch wrote:4th UPDATE, Friday, 11:15 PM:
While it looks as if Interstellar claimed Friday’s space race at the box office, Disney’s formidable ground troops — kids and parents with matinee money to burn — should lead the animated superhero tale Big Hero 6 to the overall weekend win. With both films expected in over $50M, it would mark only the fourth time in box office history that’s occurred. In one of the year’s marquee match-ups, Christopher Nolan’s sci-fi saga and Disney’s first animated film to feature Marvel characters were on trajectories to hit close to their projections. But the well-reviewed Hero still proved surprisingly potent on a Friday night, particularly for a family-geared PG film, suggesting strong adult turnout. That momentum should carry it through the weekend to make Hero the over-performer of the duo.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Dec 06, 2014 3:22 am

Sony Hack Reveals Top-Secret Profitability of 2013 Movies
A new document reveals figures for 'This Is the End,' 'Grown Ups 2,' 'Captain Phillips' and 'American Hustle,' among others
Tatiana Siegel wrote:According to the leaked document, several 2013 movies will end up in profit, including This Is the End ($50 million in profits), Grown Ups 2 ($48 million), Captain Phillips ($39 million), American Hustle ($27 million), One Direction: This Is Us ($18 million), Elysium ($18 million) and Monuments Men ($10 million). Several other movies will not make a profit, according to the document (Monuments Men was scheduled to be released in 2013 but was pushed to 2014).

The document also illuminated Belgrad’s handling of negotiations on a Paul Blart: Mall Cop sequel. “The production budget was originally set between $45M and $50M,” the letter says. “Doug successfully negotiated with the producers to get Kevin James to accept less compensation and to reduce the production budget to approximately $38M.”

Similarly, Belgrad brought the budget of the upcoming Adam Sandler movie Pixels down by $25 million even after chairman and CEO Michael Lynton agreed to make it for up to $135 million. "Doug artfully negotiated with the producers to reduce the production budget to $110M and through his own network of contacts secured the required co-financing,” the letter says.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 23, 2015 8:36 pm

‘Tomorrowland,’ ‘Pitch Perfect’ Battling For No. 1; ‘Mad Max’ Holds Strong; ‘Ultron’ To Cross $400M – Box Office Saturday
Anita Busch wrote:The other big news is that Warner Bros. is enjoying a wonderful hold this holiday weekend as Fury Road rides into its second weekend, with a drop of only 44% after adding just a handful (20) of theaters. At the end of the four-day weekend, they will be hovering slightly under $100M
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jul 11, 2015 2:05 am

Box Office: 'Minions' Eyes Massive $115M Debut in U.S.
Overseas, the prequel is crossing the $200 million mark on Friday.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Mon Sep 07, 2015 10:50 am

Summer Box Office: How Movie Tracking Went Off the Rails
Projections said 'Jurassic World' would do 60 percent of what it made opening weekend. 'Terminator: Genisys' fell short by 25 percent. Meanwhile, poorly reviewed movies tanked as Twitter buzz and Rotten Tomatoes destroyed careful marketing campaigns and execs began to question prerelease surveys: "Maybe we need to re-examine the methodology."
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Oct 14, 2015 10:06 am

‘Pan’ Looks for China Life Raft as it Faces $100 Million Writedown
Brent Lang wrote:The film has racked up a meager $40.5 million globally, which is a far cry from the $150 million that Warner Bros. spent to make the picture and the additional $100 million it shelled out to market it. Analysts and rival studio executives predict that the film will result in losses of at least $100 million, given that it needs to do at least $400 million in order to recoup its costs. Estimates for the film’s ultimate global gross ranged from $150 million to just over $200 million, either of which would keep the Neverland epic submerged in red ink.

“Pan” had the air of a troubled production ever since it was moved from a prime summer release date into the fall. However, its U.S. opening was even lower than pessimistic projections. The film managed to pull in a paltry $15.3 million, lower than its anticipated $20 million debut. Its failure compounds a disappointing year for Warner Bros. The studio scored with the disaster movie “San Andreas” and the Oscar contender “American Sniper,” but it lost tens of millions of dollars on the likes of “Jupiter Ascending,” “Entourage,” “We Are Your Friends,” and “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” Other pictures like “Mad Max: Fury Road” put up respectable global numbers, but cost too much to turn much of a profit. Next year looks stronger with “Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice” and the Harry Potter spin-off “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” both on tap.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby so sorry on Wed Oct 14, 2015 12:32 pm

TheButcher wrote:‘Pan’ Looks for China Life Raft as it Faces $100 Million Writedown
Brent Lang wrote:The film has racked up a meager $40.5 million globally, which is a far cry from the $150 million that Warner Bros. spent to make the picture and the additional $100 million it shelled out to market it. Analysts and rival studio executives predict that the film will result in losses of at least $100 million, given that it needs to do at least $400 million in order to recoup its costs. Estimates for the film’s ultimate global gross ranged from $150 million to just over $200 million, either of which would keep the Neverland epic submerged in red ink.

“Pan” had the air of a troubled production ever since it was moved from a prime summer release date into the fall. However, its U.S. opening was even lower than pessimistic projections. The film managed to pull in a paltry $15.3 million, lower than its anticipated $20 million debut. Its failure compounds a disappointing year for Warner Bros. The studio scored with the disaster movie “San Andreas” and the Oscar contender “American Sniper,” but it lost tens of millions of dollars on the likes of “Jupiter Ascending,” “Entourage,” “We Are Your Friends,” and “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” Other pictures like “Mad Max: Fury Road” put up respectable global numbers, but cost too much to turn much of a profit. Next year looks stronger with “Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice” and the Harry Potter spin-off “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” both on tap.



Yowza. I don't think they had a specific target for this incarnation of Pan. From the commercials I saw, it was scewed too old for my kids (9 and 6), and certainly not old enough for my tastes. And it looked like a jumbled mess to boot.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Fri Oct 23, 2015 9:10 pm

‘The Martian’ Returning To No. 1 Above Five-Pic Logjam; ‘Jem’ & ‘Kasbah’ Crashing
Anthony D'Alessandro wrote:If Darwin was assessing the survival of the fittest at the box office this weekend, he’d hand it to the holdovers. 20th Century Fox’s The Martian, after hitting No. 1 essentially every day during the past week, is projected to bounce back this weekend to the No. 1 spot with an industry estimate of $13.5M-$14M in its fourth sesh with a potential cume by Sunday of $164.5M. Following close behind is Sony’s PG-rated Goosebumps which is going for a second FSS of $13M and a 10-day cume of $41.2M. All projections are based off of matinee estimates and as we know the chart could be completely different by tonight.




Hollywood Slugger Warner Bros. Strikes Out at 2015 Box Office
Only two of the studio’s 21 releases have topped $100 million domestically in year marred by three major bombs
However, the way of Hollywood is such that if things don’t turn around in the coming year change is all but inevitable.

“When you have a year like this, you have to reevaluate, and if you do that, then you’re fine,” a producer who has worked with the studio told TheWrap. “Are you spending too much money on movies that don’t have franchise potential? If so, then you have to stop doing that.”

“Pan,” a fairy tale saga with a $150 million production budget, cost too much for a subject matter of little interest to millennials and offering a tough framework for building sequels, this producer said.

The structural problem for Warner is that its biggest franchise hits, including “Harry Potter” and “Lord of the Rings,” have ended. DC Comics heavyweights like Batman and Superman aren’t around this year, either. This holiday season will be the first in three years that Warner Bros. will enter without one of Peter Jackson‘s Tolkien tales to dominate the box office.

This has left the studio grasping for medium-sized hits while it gears up for potentially new franchises.
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