The Official Box Office Thread

All the dirt. All the top secret stuff. Anything that has to do with the process of getting us to sit and watch something projected on the big screen.

Re: The Official TOHO Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:56 pm

From Variety:
Japanese distrib Toho sets new B.O. record - It took $902 million in 2010
Mark Schilling wrote:Tokyo -- Toho, Japan's biggest distrib by a mile, set a record at the box office in 2010, earning $902 million and beating its $890 million record set in 2008.

Toho released the top three domestic pics: Studio Ghibli toon "The Borrowers" ($111 million), sea action pic "Umizaru 3" ($97 million) and police thriller "Bayside Shakedown 3" ($88 million).

It accounted for 11 pics in the foreign and domestic B.O. top 20, compared with one each for domestic rivals Toei and Gaga.

All in all, the company bowed 21 pics that each earned 1 billion yen ($12 million) considered the mark of a commercial hit in Japan.

Toho is hoping to better this record in 2011 with a line-up that includes two-part sci-fi thriller "Gantz," the boxing comic adaptation "Tomorrow's Joe," the thriller "Kosaku Kuroda, Diplomat," Studio Ghibli toon "Kokuriku-Zaka Kara" and the 3D live-action fantasy "Kaibutsu-kun."
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby minstrel on Sun Feb 13, 2011 5:04 pm

Justin Bieber's new movie just took in $30 million on a $13 million budget in its first weekend. Does this mean that this 16-year-old teen pop kid is a new movie superstar? Or is he just a passing fad - a very profitable fad, but a passing one? Will he be forgotten (but sitting on a large fortune) by the time he's twenty? Will he be a pathetic has-been playing the oldies circuit when he's twenty-one? Will he be a drug casualty at twenty-two? Will he wind up in prison after five trips to rehab by the time he's twenty-five, like Lindsay Lohan? Am I jealous of some young punk whose music I despise yet who is blindingly successful?
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Ribbons on Sun Feb 13, 2011 5:32 pm

All of the above? Wait that doesn't work...

I'm okay with it. As long as pop culture has existed there's been some teen heartthrob that young girls will murder their parents to go see. Guessing whether he has a more lasting career as he grows up is kind of a crapshoot since it's gone in either (or both!) direction many times, but he can write and play music on his own, so at least he's a little more respectable than The Monkees.

And of course it was in 3D for no good reason, so that doubles its BO take.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby BuckyO'harre on Sun Feb 13, 2011 9:53 pm

Ribbons wrote:but he can write and play music on his own, so at least he's a little more respectable than The Monkees.



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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Ribbons on Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:11 pm

O-Town? Should I have said O-Town?
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby SilentScream on Tue Mar 01, 2011 10:22 am

Personally, I find it amusing that The Beibered One get so many men riled up. The same ones that probably were drooling over those early Britney videos - you know, the one with her dressed up as a schoolgirl and all. Just saying...
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 09, 2011 4:54 pm

Why The Box Office Doesn’t Matter Anymore
# Graeme McMillan wrote:I think it was the news that the follow-up to Tron: Legacy was moving ahead, despite the relative disappointment of last year’s 20-years-after-the-fact sequel, that made me really stop and think: When will we all stop paying attention to the box office?

Here’s the thing: Tron: Legacy barely broke even at the US box office – I think it made $1 million more than it cost – which means that it actually lost money, when you factor in promotion costs. And yet, Disney pretty much had to greenlight the follow-up, because it had already invested so much in the brand (Not just Legacy, but the two separate animated series set to spin-off from it, the remastered reissue of the original on DVD and BluRay and tie-in videogames, comics and other material). Before the release of the movie, executives were talking about Tron being positioned as one of Disney’s major boy-centric brands, and apparently, not even a critically-panned, medium-level success movie can stand in its way.

Don’t worry; Legacy will be fine; it’ll make a reasonable profit now that it’s on BluRay, especially with the 3D BluRay edition. But that’s not anything new; there have been movies that have flopped in theaters but found audiences large enough on home release that a sequel has ended up happening (Why, Boondock Saints, how fetching and yet entirely unwatchable you seem today), enough to make me wonder whether box office even counts as the primary market for movies these days. After all, the longer shelf-life is home entertainment, and with studios already signed up to a premium VoD service sending movies to televisions just 60 days after theater release, that seems to be something that’s become even more the case, rather than going in the opposite direction.

(One of the reasons why so many studios – all of the majors save Paramount – have signed on to Home Premiere, the DirecTV premium VoD scheme is apparently that movies only have, on average, a 56 day lifespan in theaters. Which, let’s face it, isn’t very long at all.)

On top of all of that, looking at the box office as a gauge for success seems even less reliable when you consider two more factors: Multiple ticket prices and inflated demand. With IMAX and 3D in the mix, movies can take the top spot in terms of money earned in a particular amount of time without actually being the most successful movie in the same period, purely because IMAX and 3D tickets cost more… which kind of undermines the entire point of tracking box office take in the first place, surely. Not only that, but on the rare occasion when a movie is a genuine, honest-to-goodness hit, that’s something that can be entirely missed when looking at the weekly box office, because a steady, long-term earner can be eclipsed by the rush to see that weekend’s latest flash in the pan (See How To Train Your Dragon last year, for example).

So with all of these reasons not to focus on box office, what are the odds that the movie industry will look at the bigger picture when it comes to determining success or making decisions? I’d like to believe they’d be pretty good, but then I remember that there’s a third Transformers movie coming out this summer…



From The Playlist:
Joseph Kosinski On Why Disney Passed On ‘Oblivion,’ Weighs In On Possible ‘Tron’ Sequel
But “Tron: Legacy” is the perfect definition of the New Blockbuster. To Disney, the $320 million spent on “Tron: Legacy” is cash thrown towards an ancillary. The film is part of a multimedia assault, one that includes the multiple Daft Punk soundtrack releases, DVD packaging and repackaging opportunities, video games, toys and the full-court press being given to the star-studded upcoming television show. To be able to say the ‘Tron’ experiment (re-energizing a long-dead brand name over multiple mediums) was a success would be to have access to Disney’s elaborate ‘Tron’ portfolio. The movie and Joseph Kosinski are only small parts of a huge puzzle. Which is a way of saying that in the current blockbuster moviemaking paradigm, the movie doesn’t entirely matter anymore.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 28, 2011 2:22 am

'Hangover Part 2' Breaks Record! $31.6M Thursday Opening Includes $10.4M Midnight Screenings: Wolfpack On Way To $125M; 'Kung Fu Panda 2' $5.8M For $65M Holiday
THURSDAY PM/FRIDAY AM, 3RD UPDATE: This is already a Memorial-izing Weekend for breaking comedy records. It's looking like both big opening films today are on track for their pre-release estimates. But Warner Bros/Legendary Pictures' The Hangover Part 2 on Thursday racked up the largest-grossing R-rated comedy opening in motion picture history (besting the same studio's Sex And The City Friday opening of $26.7M). "It doesn't get much better than this," an exultant Warner Bros bigwig emailed me this morning. The Wolfpack's Bangkok-set replay is heading for an astounding $31.6 million Thursday including $10.4M in midnight shows. Granted, that'll be its best-grossing day for this 5-day Memorial Weekend since 80% of colleges will be out Thursday and Friday. But who cares? Money is money whether earned on a Thursday or a Friday. Exit polling showed that 51% of the audience was female, and 41% of moviegoers were aged 18 to 24 and 13% were under 18. Audiences gave the pic an "A-" CinemaScore overall, with under 18 rating it "A+". The film played strong in both blue and red states with Los Angeles overindexing to lead the major cities. Hollywood is expecting a 3-day weekend of $80M-$85M and an extra-long 5-day Memorial holiday of $125M. And all for a 2D film without the higher 3D ticket prices. Yowza!

DreamWorks Animation's Kung Fu Panda 2 distributed by Paramount earned an "A" CinemaScore and is debuting Thursday with $6 million because only 10% of K-12 schools are out on Thursday and just 20% on Friday. The toon sequel should gross bigger each day with $45M-$50M expected for the 3-day weekend and $65M-$70M for the extra-long 5-day Memorial holiday. Internationally, Panda 2 opens in 10 markets day and date including Russia and Korea. Disney's Pirates Of The Caribbean 4: On Stranger Tides should hold with $40M for the 3-day weekend and $60M for the traditional 4-day Memorial holiday. Full analysis Friday.

10:15 AM UPDATE: This Memorial Weekend started early for the 2011 Summer Movie Season with both Warner Bros/Legendary Pictures' The Hangover Part 2 and DreamWorks Animation's Kung Fu Panda 2 distributed by Paramount screening Thursday midnight shows. Warner Bros is saying that Hangover Part 2, one of the most anticipated sequels of the summer, opened after midnight in 2,600 locations with $10.4 million. That's a big big number and sets the record for the highest grossing R-rated midnight show. (The previous record was Paranormal Activity's $6.3M.) But it's still on the low side of the $10M-$15M that rival studios were expecting. It sets an R-rated film record today by debuting in 3,615 theaters, which should translate into a big $20M for Thursday. With the first Hangover having made the weekend of June 5, the sequel is expected to reach $80M-$85M for the three-day weekend, and then as high as $125 million according to some rival studio estimates for the five-day-long weekend starting today. Warner Bros is projecting the five-day estimate at $100M. And that's for a 2D feature without the higher 3D ticket prices. One reason for the giant number is because 80% of colleges will be out Thursday and Friday. The only obstacle standing in this Bangkok-set sequel's way is whether it's too much like the original: it has only 33% positive reviews on Rotten Tomatoes as of this morning.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 29, 2011 9:53 pm

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby DennisMM on Fri Aug 05, 2011 11:08 am

Looks as if Captain America may be in trouble, as discussed in its thread. Only $127 million after 12 days. It appears to have fizzled a bit. With Rise of the Planet of the Apes opening, it might be lucky to make back its $140 million production budget, leaving the promotional monies as a loss. In some ways, it was made as a prequel to next year's The Avengers, but it still needed to perform solidly to justify its expense.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby The Vicar on Sun Aug 07, 2011 6:45 pm

Is it too soon to label Cowboys & Aliens a bomb? It's certainly is under performing its ass off. Too bad.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby minstrel on Sun Aug 07, 2011 8:01 pm

The Vicar wrote:Is it too soon to label Cowboys & Aliens a bomb? It's certainly is under performing its ass off. Too bad.


I have the same problem with this film as I had with Green Lantern. The budget was just too damn high! $163 million, on a non-series, non-James-Cameron film? Starring Harrison Ford, whom everybody hates unless he's playing Indiana Jones? And Daniel Craig, whom nobody has ever heard of, unless they like James Bond, in which case they like James Bond and not Craig? Neither of these guys are stars who can open a movie. Maybe Ford was once, but he had a lot of box office failures and has proven that he's anything but a reliable draw.

And the title makes it sound like a joke, not like a serious film. "Cowboys and Aliens" is a high-concept pitch to studio execs, not a title. "Snakes on a Plane" didn't work, either.

It seems like ever since Avatar, studios are handing gigantic budgets to practically anybody who walks in the door with any kind-of-iffy idea. I think there's a strong whiff of tulipmania in Hollywood these days.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Peven on Sun Aug 07, 2011 8:11 pm

DennisMM wrote:Looks as if Captain America may be in trouble, as discussed in its thread. Only $127 million after 12 days. It appears to have fizzled a bit. With Rise of the Planet of the Apes opening, it might be lucky to make back its $140 million production budget, leaving the promotional monies as a loss. In some ways, it was made as a prequel to next year's The Avengers, but it still needed to perform solidly to justify its expense.


the domestic take as of today covers the production expense by a couple $million, not including promotional costs. not sure what the global take is but i think even before a single dvd is purchased it will be safely in the black and then some.


my sons and I saw "Cowboys & Aliens" at the drive-in the other night and we liked it, thought it was an overall solid summer fun flick. but when i look at the budget I have to ask where all the money went.....and i think the blame probably has to fall on Favs for that
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby DennisMM on Sun Aug 07, 2011 8:33 pm

Cap did better than I expected. Good. I'm sure DVD purchases will bring Cap well into line with his costs, but will it convince the suits to back similar projects? That's what I'm wondering.

I suspect a large amount of the Cowboys budget went toward Ford and Craig. Those two probably could pull better than $40 million between them, which would be 1/4 of the production budget.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Mon Feb 06, 2012 6:37 am

From Deadline:
‘Chronicle’ Tackles ‘Woman In Black’ For #1; Both Overperform For $22M Vs $21M Super Bowl Weekend; ‘Big Miracle’ Bombs $8.5M
NIKKI FINKE wrote:I’m back in front of the computer tonight. It’s been a bigger-than-predicted box office this Super Bowl weekend — $110M moviegoing overall which is +33% from last year as February starts out hotter than tracking showed for these low-budget genre films. Friday night numbers seesawed into the wee hours of Saturday morning until Fox’s scifi found-footage spectacle Chronicle came out ahead by $300,000 over CBS FIlms’ Daniel Radcliffe thriller The Woman In Black. By Sunday Fox is clearly #1 for the weekend with grosses $22M vs $21M respectively. Trust me, no one in Hollywood projected either movie would get near $20M so this gives new meaning to the term ‘overperform’. Best, both films are a low-cost/high-reward bonanza for the two studios, especially because budgets were kept low as well as the marketing spends. Better yet, both films managed to attract the elusive young audiences who were missing for the last six months of 2011. ”What is great is that young people went to both movies in droves,” an exec tells me. Though it’s the weekend’s biggest budget debut, Universal’s Big Miracle is a disappointment – only an $8.1M weekend which is less than the $10M execs hoped for. Last week’s big winner, Open Road’s The Grey, is showing a solid hold.
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Re: Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace

Postby TheButcher on Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:58 am

From THR 2/23/2012:
'Star Wars: Phantom Menace' Crosses $1 Billion Mark at Box Office
Pamela McClintock wrote:George Lucas' Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace has crossed $1 billion in worldwide box office with 20th Century Fox's rerelease of the film in 3D.

It's the first individual Star Wars title to join the $1 billion club.

Since opening worldwide less than two weeks ago, Phantom Menace has earned $73.4 million, pushing its cume to $1,000.4 billion through Wednesday.

And it's only $1.5 million from matching and then overtaking The Dark Knight ($1,001.9 million) to become the 10th-highest-grossing film of all time, not accounting for inflation.

The Phantom Menace rerelease has earned $35.8 million domestically and $37.6 million internationally. It is the 11th film to earn $1 billion or more globally.

Fox also is celebrating an Alvin and the Chipmunks milestone: The third entry in the series, Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked, has grossed $200 million in Latin America, a franchise best. The threequel has grossed $326.4 million worldwide.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Mar 21, 2012 3:01 am

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Re: The Avengers

Postby TheButcher on Sun May 06, 2012 10:12 pm

From Deadline:
‘THE AVENGERS’ NOW BIGGEST OPENER! Shocking $200M Record Domestic Weekend: Expecting $642M Global From First 12 Days
Paramount Making Money Off ‘Avengers’ Too
‘Marvel’s The Avengers’: Records & Factoids
NIKKI FINKE wrote:
    · Biggest domestic opening weekend of all time.

    · Fastest film to reach $200M (3 days).

    · Highest Saturday of all time: $69.7M.

    · 8th biggest midnights opening.

    · Biggest superhero midnights debut.

    · Passed domestic totals for Captain America and Thor.

    · Passed international box office totals of Captain America ($192M), Iron Man ($266.7M), Thor ($268.3M), and Iron Man 2 ($311.5M) in 12 days of release.

    · Biggest opening weekend of all time in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, Central America, Peru, Bolivia, Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines.

    · Biggest Marvel opening weekend in Russia (May 3): $17.9M.

    · Passed the global box office totals of Captain America ($364M) and Thor ($449M) and Iron Man ($585M) and Iron Man 2 ($624M).

    · 110 domestic IMAX locations established a new opening Saturday record.

    · Biggest IMAX domestic opening weekend for a digital only release.

    · Highest grossing opening weekend in IMAX’s history

    · Domestic weekend estimate from all 4,349 theaters: $200.3M.

    · Domestic weekend theater average: $46,063.

    · International weekend estimate: $151.5M

    · In 52 territories representing about 95% of the international market.

    · International cume: $441.5M

    · Global cume estimate: $641.8M

    · Crossed the $600M global box office threshold today after just 12 days of release.

    · Performance to date in key international territories: UK $48.1M, Mexico $40.2M, Australia $32.2M, Korea $31.3M, Brazil $31.0M, France $26.4M, Italy $18.8M, Germany $18.3M, Russia $17.9M, China $17.4M, Spain $14.4M, Taiwan $14.3M, Philippines $11.5M.

    · IMAX global total box office: $31.2M

    · Cinema Score: A+

    · Rotten Tomatoes: 94% positive reviews

    · Audience: 50% over 25, 50% under 25; 60% male, 40% female; 55% couples, 24% family, 21% teens.

    · Viewing: 52% 3D, 40% traditional 2D, 8% IMAX, 4% premium large format.


From THR:
The Disney and Marvel Studios tentpole makes history in nabbing the biggest opening of all time in North America; globally "Avengers" has earned a massive $641.8 million in 12 days.

From Variety:
'Avengers' blows out all-time B.O. record with $200 mil - Marvel pic trounces 'Potter' finale for best domestic opening weekend
Par takes hefty slice on 'Avengers' - Under deal studio gets minimum distribution fee of $115 million
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Re: The Avengers

Postby TheButcher on Sun May 06, 2012 10:28 pm

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Wolfpack on Mon May 14, 2012 12:25 am

My spidey senses are detecting a shitload of money.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby ONeillSG1 on Sun Jul 29, 2012 5:58 pm

The Watch failed to make over 15 million at the box office this weekend?

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Wolfpack on Sun Jul 29, 2012 8:49 pm

ONeillSG1 wrote:The Watch failed to make over 15 million at the box office this weekend?

Image


Looks like they should *puts on sunglasses* change the title to Don't Watch.

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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheBaxter on Mon Jul 30, 2012 10:30 am

ONeillSG1 wrote:The Watch failed to make over 15 million at the box office this weekend?

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doesn't surprise me, since i never even heard of it.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby justcheckin on Mon Jul 30, 2012 10:45 am

TheBaxter wrote:
ONeillSG1 wrote:The Watch failed to make over 15 million at the box office this weekend?

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doesn't surprise me, since i never even heard of it.


I was going to say the same thing... hehehe
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Mon Nov 12, 2012 10:47 am

From Variety:
Box office: Does being No. 1 count for anything anymore?
Peter Bart wrote:While movie grosses are clearly relevant to the trade press, the box office reports these days are even more misleading than they were a generation ago when they first were reported in the consumer media. Writing in the Columbia Journalism Review this month, Edward Jay Epstein reminds us that the filmgoer is led to all the wrong conclusions by box office data -- if he pays any attention to it at all.

The reasons:

• The films that ultimately turn out to be most profitable rarely open atop the B.O. list or even in the top three. (They usually don't open at enough locations.)

• A growing number of movies that open like losers in the U.S. register huge grosses overseas, where some 70% of the ticket buyers reside.

• Since roughly 85% of a film's earnings will likely stem from TV licensing in one form or another (with ever-higher numbers from VOD or Netflix), the box office figures essentially represent a "pseudo event" (Epstein's words). And the event is becoming even more "pseudo."

To be sure, box office news still has its proponents. The consumer press feels like it's revealing insights on the youth culture by disclosing numbers on "The Avengers." And studio marketers covet the publicity because they can shout that their film is "the No. 1 movie in the nation."

The "No. 1" claim, of course, may be both ephemeral (one weekend) or meaningless in terms of true revenue. Epstein cites one classic example -- a Paramount release titled "Sahara" that had its fleeting No. 1 moment but still managed to lose $78.3 million on the bottom line. (The film totaled $160 million and its ad budget came to $81 million.) Summoned as an expert witness on a lawsuit triggered by the film, Epstein came away with a lasting impression about the surreal economics of supposedly hit films.

As we plunge into awards season, the reality is that most of the kudos contenders will never be billed as No. 1 ("The Hobbit" better be an exception, given its cost). The most profitable award winners of recent years, like "Black Swan"or "The King's Speech," never sat atop the list.

This year, "Moonrise Kingdom," initially released in only four theaters, opened in the shadows of "Men in Black 3," which bowed at 4,248 locations, but "Moonrise" is still coasting along (it has grossed $65 million).

Huge international hits like "The Intouchables" or "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" also were absent from the list derby.

So is anyone still paying attention to the No. 1 ploy? The bankers realize that most new releases will lose vast sums of money during their theatrical runs despite the media hype. And the buzz about a hot new film reaches young audiences weeks, if not months, before the box office.

In the end, therefore, box office stories may not only be a "pseudo event" but rather a "pseudo anachronism." That's news for movie marketers to ponder.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:35 am

From THR:
Billion-Dollar Bond Breakdown: Who's Making What From 'Skyfall'
MGM, the Broccoli family and Sony all have fingers in the pie as the extraordinary worldwide grosses come just in time for a flashy IPO.

Stephen Galloway & Alex Ben Block. wrote:The numbers have left Hollywood shaken and a little bit stirred. Skyfall, the 23rd installment of the 50-year-old James Bond franchise, has become a global phenomenon. Its opening-weekend haul in the U.S. was $88.4 million -- almost $21 million more than the previous Bond, 2008's Quantum of Solace. Even adjusting for inflation, that's a big leap. (Quantum's $67.5 million would be $72.5 million in today's dollars.) And overseas, the numbers are even more impressive, with $427.8 million in grosses outside the U.S. as of Nov. 11. Many Hollywood observers now believe the Sam Mendes-directed picture could be the first Bond -- and only the 14th film ever -- to pass the $1 billion mark at the worldwide box office.

"In particular, the numbers in the U.K. and Latin America have been astonishing," says Wunderlich Securities analyst Matthew Harrigan. "It speaks to the strength of the Bond franchise."

The windfall will benefit three players in the Bond universe: studio MGM; producers and rightsholders Barbara Broccoli, 52, and Michael G. Wilson, 70; and distributor Sony Pictures. Here's how Bond's possible billion would be divvied up:

In a complicated deal that was heavily negotiated with Sony after MGM emerged from bankruptcy in 2010, several insiders say MGM and Broccoli and Wilson will jointly collect 75 percent of the movie's profits, depending on overhead charges and other fees.

The remaining 25 percent will go to Sony, which funded part of Skyfall's roughly $210 million production budget (it came in under $200 million after tax breaks) and which will recoup heavy costs for prints and advertising before profits are allocated. Sony is believed to be taking a distribution fee, but the precise amount is not known. (The studio declined comment.) 20th Century Fox is handling home video.

How MGM and the Broccoli family split their own 75 percent also is complicated. Two executives familiar with the deal say it involves voluminous contracts between MGM and two companies controlled by Broccoli and Wilson, Eon Prods. and Danjaq LLC. The executives say the half-siblings and heirs to the original producer, Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli, stand to make tens of millions, though just how much they will earn compared with MGM will be affected by the revenue source (theatrical vs. home video, for instance), different box-office thresholds, etc. One finance expert estimates that, if the movie grosses $1 billion, MGM and Broccoli/Wilson together would partake in roughly $150 million in profits (with another $50 million going to Sony) before they even get to the far more lucrative ancillary revenue.

The cash comes at a key time for MGM and its CEO Gary Barber, who is plotting a possible initial public offering in 2013, after the first installment of the MGM-produced The Hobbit is released by Warner Bros. on Dec. 14. "This is very good for an IPO situation," notes analyst Harold Vogel of the Skyfall numbers. "I believe they can use this capital to tide them over when they don't have a Bond or a Hobbit movie." Having such phenomenal success with a franchise that isn't ending anytime soon "is important in putting any kind of a roadshow presentation together," he adds.

One person who won't share in the profits, however, is Daniel Craig. While sources say the Bond star made $17 million for Skyfall and is expected to receive bonuses for certain box-office milestones, he is not a gross participant and won't receive a piece of the backend. (The Broccolis famously do not offer backend to talent.)

But Craig, 44, likely will get a pay raise for Bond 24, which Skyfall co-writer John Logan is developing and will be the first in the franchise whose storyline spans two films. The actor renegotiated his deal after 2006's Casino Royale grossed nearly $600 million worldwide and is committed to at least two more outings as 007, but insiders expect a fresh renegotiation to take place.

That could leave Craig in the $20 million-plus zone reserved for Hollywood's very top stars.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby so sorry on Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:48 am

That could leave Craig in the $20 million-plus zone reserved for Hollywood's very top stars.


Certainly that will be his next Bond salary, but I don't think he'd get close to that on any other film. James Bond as a brand and a franchise is almost a guaranteed money maker.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby travis-dane on Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:34 pm

From Box Office Mojo:

The Last Stand wound up in ninth place for the three-day weekend with $6.2 million (10th place for the four-day with $7.3 million). This was supposed to be star Arnold Schwarzenegger's big comeback movie, but it earned less than half as much as Schwarzenegger's 2000 disappointment The 6th Day ($13.02 million).
Similar to Broken City, The Last Stand just never looked all that appealing; still, one has to wonder if Schwarzenegger really has any drawing power whatsoever after his rocky stint as governor and the recent revelation that he fathered a child with one of his maids. He is at least getting a few more shots—The Tomb (Sept. 27) and Ten (Jan. 24, 2014) are in the can already—but it's likely that studios will now be more hesitant about investing big bucks in the 65-year-old actor.


If The Tomb and Ten dont make some serious coin, we can kiss King Conan goodbye.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Spandau Belly on Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:53 pm

I didn't expect Arnie to jump back into movies with his early 90s level of mass appeal, but I was pretty surprised that he didn't at least have the same draw that Statham or The Rock have had in action roles in the last ten years.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby so sorry on Mon Jan 21, 2013 10:51 pm

Yikes that's rough for Arnold. Movie certainly got enough hype.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Nachokoolaid on Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:56 am

I thought it was a fun movie too. As enjoyable as some of his others. More than some, actually. I wouldn't put it near the top of his filmography, but it was a pretty good time.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:28 am

'Jack the Giant Slayer' Could Lose up to $140 Million for Warner Bros., Legendary
Bryan Singer's flop is on track to land between Universal's "Battleship" and Disney's "John Carter" in terms of damage.
Pamela McClintock wrote:This story first appeared in the April 12 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.

Warner Bros. is facing a substantial financial hit on Bryan Singer's Jack the Giant Slayer. Now four weeks into its run, the fractured fairy tale starring Nicholas Hoult and Ewan McGregor is on track to lose $125 million to $140 million for the studio and financial partner Legendary Pictures, insiders tell THR.

That would put the film midway between Universal's 2012 flop Battleship and Disney's John Carter in terms of financial damage. Legendary financed half of the production budget for Jack, minimizing the studio's loss.

Jack likely will top out at $65 million domestically and about $140 million internationally, resulting in a global total of not much more than $200 million. That's not enough to cover the film's price tag, which includes a production budget near $200 million and a worldwide marketing spend north of $100 million.

New Line, a division of Warner Bros., was counting on a strong foreign performance similar to Warners' Clash of the Titans films, but with tough competition from Disney's Oz the Great and Powerful and Paramount's G.I. Joe: Retaliation, Jack is slow overseas.

New Line can take to heart that The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey hit $1 billion in global receipts in the first quarter, while Warners has a strong 2013 summer slate anchored by Man of Steel in the wings. Legendary financed half of the Superman reboot, along with WB's other summer pics The Hangover Part III and 300: Rise of an Empire.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby travis-dane on Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:10 am

Not very surprising that they lose money on a threehundredmillion dollar movie. Not every movie makes a billion bucks at the B.O.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheBaxter on Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:09 am

sounds more like Jack the Giant Slapper
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby RogueScribner on Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:28 am

I just don't get the studio mentality behind spending hundreds of millions of dollars on what's essentially a 2nd-rate kids movie. As travis stated, not every movie makes a billion dollars so why risk the money unless you're really sure about the material? I can't fathom a studio hearing the pitch and thinking this would be the new Star Wars or something. Meanwhile, medium-budgeted films get squeezed out and movies end up being less interesting overall.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheBaxter on Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:38 am

Trollhunter was made for about $3.5 million, or about 1% the cost of Jack the Giant Slayer. and many would argue it had better-looking giants/trolls.

i think i see the problem here.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby travis-dane on Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:36 pm

TheBaxter wrote:Trollhunter was made for about $3.5 million, or about 1% the cost of Jack the Giant Slayer. and many would argue it had better-looking giants/trolls.

i think i see the problem here.


and it was a GOOD movie.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sun Apr 14, 2013 3:54 am

On the danger of the normalization of the $1 billion blockbuster...
Scott Mendelson wrote:Just a few years ago, had I written a piece entitled “There are no films guaranteed to gross $1 billion this year”, you likely would have laughed and said “Of course not!”. As recently as 2010, the idea that any movie could or would gross $1 billion in worldwide ticket sales was somewhat of a pipe dream. From 1997 to 2006, there were just two films to reach that milestone, they being Titanic (the biggest movie of all-time with a seemingly insurmountable $1.8 billion) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, the Oscar-winning chapter to what can be argued is the finest screen trilogy of our time (that’s a debate for another day). In 2006, we saw the powerhouse success of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest which parlayed the unexpected popularity of the first film into an even larger haul for its sequel, breaking the domestic opening weekend record at the time ($135 million) and earning a massive $423 million in America and $642 million overseas. In 2008, The Dark Knight pulled another “massively popular sequel to unexpectedly well-liked original” trick to the tune of $533 million in America (good for the second biggest grosser of all time in America, if only for a year) and just over $1 billion worldwide despite not playing in China due to that pesky “Chinese gangster hides Gotham mob money” subplot. 2009 saw James Cameron do that trick that James Cameron does yet again, with Avatar earning $1 billion worldwide in about seventeen days and going on to earn an eye-popping $2.7 billion.

From 1997 to 2009 there were five $1 billion grossers. Between 2010 and 2012, we added an additional ten such films. Brought on partially by the 3D craze established by Avatar and partially by the sheer expansion of the overseas marketplace, the once fabled $1 billion grossing blockbuster became almost normal. In 2010, we had a fantasy film that few loved and quite a few disliked (Alice in Wonderland), and the final (I hope) entry to what can be argued is the finest trilogy of our time (Toy Story 3, yes we can debate that another day too). In 2011 we had three such blockbusters, all summertime sequels released in 3D. They were Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (which earned just $240 million domestic – far lower than the previous three films), Transformers: Dark of the Moon, and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part II, which was the culmination of a popular and awfully good eight-film fantasy epic spanning ten years. What we saw in 2011 was the $1 billion mark being crossed by not zeitgeist defining blockbusters but merely relatively popular sequels that capitalized on the ticket price-surcharge that comes with 3D tickets.

2012 saw a somewhat shocking four new releases cross that once unthinkable goal post, plus a 3D reissue of Star Wars: Episode One: The Phantom Menace crossing that milestone as well (The Phantom Menace earned over $900 million back in 1999 when that was a big deal). The newbies to the club were the expected successes of The Dark Knight Rises (no subplots about Chinese gangsters this time, thank you much!) and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (which crawled to $1 billion despite pretty much every one admitting it was a major comedown from the Lord of the Rings trilogy), plus the somewhat unexpectedly huge success of The Avengers (which earned a massive $1.5 billion, good for the biggest grossing film not helmed by James Cameron) and the completely unexpected $1 billion run of Skyfall, a series whose previous worldwide high was $599 million for Casino Royale. The interesting news is that two of those films, The Dark Knight Rises and Skyfall, were released strictly in 2D. This year, there is a pretty decent chance that not a single film will gross that milestone in 2013. Well, okay, so the 3D rerelease of Jurassic Park will likely push that film’s original 1993 global gross of $914 million over the goal line (Titanic 3D made $285 million overseas last year), but we’re talking new releases here.

There is the possibility for surprise and the unexpected breakout. Star Trek made just $395 million worldwide in 2009, but it’s certainly possible that the 3D/IMAX-enhanced Star Trek into Darkness could ‘pull a Dark Knight’ and capitalize in the original’s good will and massively outperform its predecessor (Batman Begins earned just $375 million back in 2005). But that’s not a guarantee. Iron Man 3 could build on the success of The Avengers and earn $1 billion the third time around, again enhanced by 3D and IMAX, but the previous two films topped out at $585 million and $623 million respectively, so that’s an awfully big jump to presume. Man of Steel is no guarantee, as Superman Returns earned $391 million back in 2006 and it’s partially a question of whether or not the Zack Snyder-helmed/Christopher Nolan-produced epic can deliver an iconic Superman film and/or whether the world still needs a Superman film. Pacific Rim is the major wildcard of the summer, an original entry that is gaining massive buzz among the geek set but. But even with that whole 3D boost thingy going for it, I’d argue that how well Guillermo Del Toro’s monsters vs. robots epic does in July depends on how good or bad the summer slate up to that point is (I’ll expand on that in a later essay).

The Hunger Games was huge in America ($408 million) but only earned $283 million overseas, so Catching Fire is not a likely $1 billion grosser (especially in mere 2D). Thor: The Dark World in November will surely get a post-Avengers boost, but going from $4449 million to $1 billion without a major selling point (like a marquee villain played by a major star) is arguably impossible. That leaves The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug in mid-December. By default it’s the most likely contender because An Unexpected Journey earned $1 billion last year. But very few people really liked the first Hobbit film, leaving the second picture in a position to actually slightly decrease in box office this time around. Looking at what’s out this summer and this holiday season, there are no sure things, which I would argue is a good thing. Because once the idea of grossing $1 billion worldwide becomes not just possible but feasible, the industry starts expecting such a thing to become commonplace and starts budgeting for it.

Disney’s Oz: The Great and Powerful may not have been expected to equal the $1 billion that Disney’s Alice In Wonderland earned in 2010, but at a cost of $215 million to produce and around $100 million in marketing costs, it has to make around $700 million just to break even, a total that it may not cross at this point. And there were any number of would-be blockbusters last year that basically *had* to make nearly $1 billion to break even. Some of them pulled it off (The Dark Knight Rises, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey), some of them scratched out that $600 million they needed to save face (Men In Black 3), while others crashed and burned (Battleship and John Carter). Many of the bigger budgeted films are surefire smash hit sequels and films like Fast & Furious 6 or Iron Man 3 are relatively safe bets despite their $200 million budgets. But mega-budgeted films like The Lone Ranger are basically banking on playing like proverbial sequels. If Disney could call the Gore Verbinski-helmed, Johnny Depp-starring western Pirates of the Caribbean 5: The Lone Ranger, they certainly would.

Even as some sense of fiscal sanity has returned to Hollywood over the last few years in terms of reasonably budgeted adult genre fare (think the $45 million spent on Argo or $13 million spent on The Call), spending on too many of the would-be tent poles presumes not just blockbuster status but near record box office triumphs. Not every film can go the distance and up until recently only a few did. But as what constitutes a smash hit climbed higher and higher (back in “my day”, a film could open to $15 million and slowly crawl to $100 million and be massively profitable), the once fabled $1 billion global gross is now in danger of becoming commonplace to the point where it’s all-but expected for the biggest films of a given year. That’s a dangerous precedent, especially as overseas audiences will eventually grow tired of 3D just as domestic audiences have mostly stopped caring about it (most such blockbusters sell more domestic 2D tickets than 3D these days). One or more of the 2013 releases discussed above may in fact break out accordingly. Or maybe none of them will, and that’s okay. Hollywood can’t keep budgeting would-be tent poles so that each one has to be not just a hit but a global blockbuster. While I do not wish box office failure on anything coming out this year, I do think it would be a little healthy for the industry to not have a $1 billion earner this year.

For those with $1 billion-blockbuster withdrawal, you can hold out until 2015 at the latest. I’m pretty sure The Avengers 2 and Star Wars: Episode VII are locks at this point.

Scott Mendelson
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Sun May 19, 2013 12:12 am

Deadline:
‘Star Trek Into Darkness’ $22M Friday For Lower $62.2M Weekend And $75.5M Domestic Cume; Overseas Total Predicted $75M

THR:
Box Office Milestone: 'Iron Man 3' Hits $1 Billion Worldwide
The Disney and Marvel Studios tentpole also jumps the $300 million mark at the domestic box office.
Pamela McClintock wrote:Taking only 22 days, Shane Black's Iron Man 3 hit $1 billion in worldwide ticket sales on Thursday to claim No. 16 on the list of all-time highest-grossing films.

In addition, Iron Man 3 crossed the $300 million mark at the domestic box office on Wednesday.

The Disney and Marvel Studios tentpole has earned $698.9 million internationally and $301.9 million in North America.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 05, 2013 6:05 pm

Will Smith's 'After Earth' Apocalypse: Who Loses Most
UPDATED: As the sci-fi bust heads toward a loss in the tens of millions, fallout touches Sony, M. Night Shyamalan and the star once considered box-office royalty.
Kim Masters wrote:The danger turned out to be very real as Sony Pictures' After Earth crashed at the box office in third place, the first time in two decades that a summer event film starring Will Smith failed to open at No. 1.

Given the low $27.5 million domestic bow and 12 percent Rotten Tomatoes score, top executives at several rival studios estimate that if the film doesn't score big overseas, it could lose tens of millions. Sony insiders put the loss at about $20 million but rivals, not surprisingly, are guessing much higher. That puts a lot of pressure on the rest of Sony's summer, including Roland Emmerich's White House Down, Grown Ups 2, the comedy This Is the End, Smurfs 2 and Matt Damon's Elysium.

So who suffers most from the fallout? Competitors and talent representatives concur that faltering director M. Night Shyamalan will take the biggest hit, but Smith -- who conceived the project, produced it with wife Jada Pinkett Smith and cast son Jaden Smith as its co-star -- has the most to lose. Insiders agree that Smith's bulletproof image could be dinged by several factors:

    ► Lack of Focus: A source who has worked with the CAA-repped Smith -- arguably the world's most bankable star -- says he has been less attuned to his movie career recently. Nearly four years passed between Seven Pounds and last summer's Men in Black 3. "One thing you've got to do as an actor is portfolio management," says this person. "Will went through a place where he didn't do a lot of movies, and none has been great." The bottom line: "He could still be highly successful, but it was automatic before. Now audiences will look more carefully."

    ► Off-Message Media: Smith, 44, and his 14-year-old son gave a joint interview to New York magazine that one prominent producer describes as "a jaw-dropper." Will Smith described himself as "a student of patterns," adding, "At heart, I'm a physicist." Even as the elder Smith described how visitors to his household would be surprised to find that it is "simple and basic," Jaden declared: "I like Cartier," noting "before that, it was Louis" (as in, Vuitton). And that type of coverage leads to …

    ► Less Fresh Prince and More Royal Prince: This began with buzz about Smith's behavior (and his gigantic trailer) during the making of MiB3. Says a prominent film exec who has worked with Smith: "That aw-shucks, incredibly charming, self-effacing spirit doesn't seem to play anymore. You can see it on talk shows. He's got that energy and positive attitude, but it doesn't have the same contagious quality." Another Smith associate believes such behavior takes a creative toll. "The control-freak stuff hits you," says this person. "You've got to listen to people. Movies don't do well when there's a hermetically sealed environment."

    ► Family Issues: The Smith family's efforts to make stars of daughter Willow and Jaden might be too much, too soon. "The Barrymores got really close to what I see in my head for my family," Smith told the Associated Press. But execs and talent reps say making Jaden the lead in After Earth -- conceived as the first in a trilogy -- was a mistake. "What are you doing, putting your kid out there like that?" says a source. "Just because it's your DNA?"

    ► Scientology Taint: Smith has kept his links to the religion much quieter than has buddy Tom Cruise. But with After Earth, media reports and reviews, including The New York Times' pan of the film, described perceived Scientology themes. Smith told New York that he and his son are "students of world religion," but a prominent producer says After Earth "opened the door to this generally well-hidden [connection with] Scientology."

    ► He's an Expensive Taste: No one is writing off Smith, though some say he may have to accept lower fees. "His deal is an absolute impediment to making money for the studios," says a knowledgeable source, adding that for MiB3, he collected about $100 million of its $624 million gross. Warner Bros. chief Jeff Robinov, who has Smith in the upcoming Winter's Tale and the in-development Focus, says he is "really confident about Will. We all have movies that don't work, but at the end of the day, Will is incredibly talented."

    ► Shyamalan Fallout: He was damaged before After Earth; he left CAA for WME in 2011, apparently partly in response to CAA's efforts to dissuade Smith from hiring him. One source says Shyamalan will have to try "very, very small, under-$10 million movies" and "just try to rebuild." He still has the Fox limited series Wayward Pines with Matt Dillon and Melissa Leo set for spring 2014.

    ► Sony's Damage: Most don't think After Earth will affect the thinking of the studio's parent, despite pressure by investor Dan Loeb to spin off assets. As for studio heads Michael Lynton and Amy Pascal, a producer calls After Earth "a justifiable decision." Smith goes back to Bad Boys in 1995 with Sony, and whatever his share of the MiB3 money, the film was the the highest grosser in the franchise. And Jaden's Karate Kid grossed $359 million in 2010. Says this producer: "You're backing a relationship [with Smith] that's been hugely successful."
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Pacino86845 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 6:39 pm

TheButcher wrote:... puts a lot of pressure on the rest of Sony's summer, including Roland Emmerich's White House Down, Grown Ups 2, the comedy This Is the End, Smurfs 2 and Matt Damon's Elysium.


Yeesh, I reckon they're gonna have a rough year. None of those features screams "success."
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby so sorry on Wed Jun 05, 2013 8:34 pm

Pacino86845 wrote:
TheButcher wrote:... puts a lot of pressure on the rest of Sony's summer, including Roland Emmerich's White House Down, Grown Ups 2, the comedy This Is the End, Smurfs 2 and Matt Damon's Elysium.


Yeesh, I reckon they're gonna have a rough year. None of those features screams "success."


Smurfs 2 is a no brainer, that'll make them some money. I think Elysium, despite the consumer UN-friendly name, is going to do well (and I'd guess they have moderate expectations for this one). But yeah White Housr Down will be forgotten quickly and the less said about grown ups 2 the better!
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Lord Voldemoo on Wed Jun 05, 2013 9:19 pm

so sorry wrote:
Pacino86845 wrote:
TheButcher wrote:... puts a lot of pressure on the rest of Sony's summer, including Roland Emmerich's White House Down, Grown Ups 2, the comedy This Is the End, Smurfs 2 and Matt Damon's Elysium.


Yeesh, I reckon they're gonna have a rough year. None of those features screams "success."


Smurfs 2 is a no brainer, that'll make them some money. I think Elysium, despite the consumer UN-friendly name, is going to do well (and I'd guess they have moderate expectations for this one). But yeah White Housr Down will be forgotten quickly and the less said about grown ups 2 the better!


I'm still thinking that This is the End might out-do expectations, but it's matched up against Man of Steel, so...
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby Spandau Belly on Thu Jun 06, 2013 7:09 am

I'll admit that I am pretty surprised at AFTER EARTH doing so badly with both critics and in the box office. I saw the trailer and even though I had no interest in seeing it, I thought it looked like an average movie and was the type of thing mainstream audiences would like.

But I dunno, a lot of these big failures over the past couple years seem to be the movies that, to my mind, seem aimed almost exclusively at little boys. SPEED RACER, JOHN CARTER, JACK THE GIANT SLAYER, and now AFTER EARTH. I saw the trailers for those movies and thought that if I had a 7 year old son, those would probably be the types of movies I would be taking him to see. Maybe that demographic on its own just isn't enough to make a successful event movie. I guess you have to make stuff like THE AVENGERS that little boys will like, but will also attract lots of adult boys. Or stuff like OZ: THE GREAT & POWERFUL that has more inter-gender appeal so people will take their daughters and their sons.
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Re: The Official Box Office Thread

Postby TheBaxter on Thu Jun 06, 2013 11:37 am

TheButcher wrote:Will Smith's 'After Earth' Apocalypse: Who Loses Most
UPDATED: As the sci-fi bust heads toward a loss in the tens of millions, fallout touches Sony, M. Night Shyamalan and the star once considered box-office royalty.


can't wait for the sequel, After Smif. i can see the trailer now:

In a world where Will Smith is no longer an automatic #1 box office draw, a studio executive and his son struggle to survive. Trapped in a post-apocalyptic wasteland of disappointing grosses by the latest Tom Cruise blockbuster, a boy must embark on a perilous journey to find the last remaining bottle of vitamin-A infused mineral water, before his father is forced to drink tap water instead. All his life, he has wanted to be a douchebag like his father. Today he gets his chance.
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Re: MAN OF $TEEL

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:56 am

Variety:
‘Man of Steel’ Early Tracking Suggests $100 Million Debut
Stuart Oldham wrote:How high will Superman fly at the box office? According to sources, “Man of Steel” is gearing up for a $100 million debut at the U.S. box office.

Early buzz on the film has been strong and Warner Bros. has been emptying the tank on its marketing campaign for Zack Snyder’s $225 million blockbuster.


CBM:
MAN OF STEEL Opening Weekend Estimated At $100M
Mark Julian wrote:According to the Hollywood trade publication Variety, the Superman reboot from Zack Snyder, Henry Cavill, David S. Goyer, Christopher Nolan and co. is currently tracking for an estimated $100M opening weekend. The trade has solicited box office expectations from various Warner Bros. executives who predict that Man of Steel will earn $300M over the course of its entire domestic run. These days, the rule of thumb for successful summer blockbusters is that international earnings will be 2x the domestic run. Doing a little math, that means Warner Bros. is hoping for a $900M box office haul for the $225 million Man of Steel.


THR:
Warner Bros.' 'Man of Steel' Nabs $170 Million in Promotional Dollars
The Superman reboot has 98 partners -- more than "The Dark Knight Rises" -- with Sears playing a "dramatic role" in the film, plus action figures (Mattel), razor blades (Gillette), cars (Chrysler), shoes (Converse) and even the National Guard.

THR:
'Man of Steel' Tracking Strong, But How Strong?
Pamela McClintock wrote:With one week left to go before Zack Snyder's Man of Steel opens in theaters, box office observers are divided as to how high the Superman reboot will soar in its North American debut.

Trying to manage expectations, Warner Bros. and Legendary Pictures are suggesting a domestic debut of $75 million-plus -- at least publicly.

Internally, a number in the $85 million to $90 million range is being thrown about as the studio looks to resurrect the marquee superhero franchise. Produced by Christopher Nolan, the $225 million tentpole headlines British actor Henry Cavill as the caped crusader.

Several of Warner's rivals believe Man of Steel has a strong shot at opening to $100 million or more over the June 14-16 weekend, considering it is pacing ahead of Fast & Furious 6, which earned $97.4 million in its first three days. And on Wednesday, June 6, online ticketing service Fandango reported that Man of Steel was outpacing all previous 2013 summer films in terms of advance ticket sales.

But others don't agree, saying that Fast & Furious 6 had the advantage of opening over Memorial Day weekend (it earned $117 million for the four-day holiday weekend). Also, Superman has been away from the multiplex. It's been seven years since Bryan Singer's Superman Returns, starring Brandon Routh, failed to hit the restart button.
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Re: MAN OF $TEEL

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jun 20, 2013 12:11 am

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Re: MAN OF $TEEL

Postby Wolfpack on Thu Jun 20, 2013 12:49 pm



An excellent haul. Superman no longer has to "kneel before Zod" to earn a living.
"Alright Shaggy - you and Scooby head over that way. The girls and I will go this way."
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