Hollywood on Strike! (Actors' Civil War!)

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Postby TheBaxter on Fri Jan 11, 2008 4:26 pm

it's a clever strategy.
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Postby Hollywood_Bob on Fri Jan 11, 2008 5:12 pm

TheBaxter wrote:
MasterWhedon wrote:
instant_karma wrote:
Theta wrote:Word is The Weinstein Company (including Dimension) signed an interim deal. So that's two down. It looks like the writers are gaining ground, I wonder when the majors are going to cave?


Do you have a link for that? That's excellent news.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/35z5y3

It was in the trades this morning. It's legit.


i think this is an interesting strategy. i wonder how many independent deals the WGA will need to sign to reach a critical mass where the AMPTP will be forced to accept their terms.


I don't think there will be to many more before the majors decide they need to act. The simple fact is that these side deals are going to allow the studios who made them begin to gobble up the best talent around for their projects, and once that starts happening the major studios will want to quash that right away.
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Postby RogueScribner on Fri Jan 11, 2008 10:55 pm

Except that a) the DGA and SGA guilds contracts are due to expire in the next 6 months and b) any terms the studios give the writers now, they'll have to give similar terms to the other guilds. So side deals are nice for the short term; these smaller production houses and the like can try to churn out a few more months of product in a hurry, but it'll all be moot if the DGA and/or the SGA strikes too. The studios know this and they're going to be very careful with anything they do or don't do in the next few months.
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Hollywood on Strike!

Postby bastard_robo on Sat Jan 12, 2008 1:37 am

http://www.variety.com/VR1117978850.html

I've been saying it, and its finally starting to happen. The networks are showing that they really dont need the writers.... These reality shows are doing just as good if not better than the scripted shows. (hence why the WGA has been pushing for the writers of these shows to be forced into their union..)

This whole strike is going to bite them in the ass in the end...
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Postby instant_karma on Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:35 am

RogueScribner wrote:Except that a) the DGA and SGA guilds contracts are due to expire in the next 6 months and b) any terms the studios give the writers now, they'll have to give similar terms to the other guilds. So side deals are nice for the short term; these smaller production houses and the like can try to churn out a few more months of product in a hurry, but it'll all be moot if the DGA and/or the SGA strikes too. The studios know this and they're going to be very careful with anything they do or don't do in the next few months.


I'm guessing that the studios making the side deals are doing so in the full knowledge that they are effectively setting the rates by which they'll have to negociate with the directors and actors guilds and factoring that into their decision making process already, and would be willing to make similar side deals with those guilds as well if they were to strike.
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Postby Theta on Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:46 am

instant_karma wrote:I'm guessing that the studios making the side deals are doing so in the full knowledge that they are effectively setting the rates by which they'll have to negociate with the directors and actors guilds and factoring that into their decision making process already, and would be willing to make similar side deals with those guilds as well if they were to strike.


Yeah, actually I would imagine that's the entire point. The Weinstein Company and UA are putting the studios on notice. I believe Lionsgate is trying to work out an interim agreement as well.
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Postby RogueScribner on Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:47 am

The real question is whether these boffo early numbers for nonscripted shows can be maintained.

In a few months, nets will virtually run out of all original scripted programming, which means reality shows could begin cannibalizing each other -- or that viewers will get sick of all reality, all the time.



I find that to be the most likely scenario. Reality is filling a void right now for an entertainment starved television audience. But it can't be sustained. Eventually everything will meld into one giant reality crapfest and people will quit watching TV altogether. Plus, the networks/studios aren't going to be able to generate longterm revenues from reality television. How many repeats of Beauty and the Geek watch compared to Friends?

Reality (for the most part) is filler until the real stuff comes back. The networks can save money on it, but they won't be making much (in the long run).
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Hollywood on Strike!

Postby bastard_robo on Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:50 am

RogueScribner wrote:
The real question is whether these boffo early numbers for nonscripted shows can be maintained.

In a few months, nets will virtually run out of all original scripted programming, which means reality shows could begin cannibalizing each other -- or that viewers will get sick of all reality, all the time.



I find that to be the most likely scenario. Reality is filling a void right now for an entertainment starved television audience. But it can't be sustained. Eventually everything will meld into one giant reality crapfest and people will quit watching TV altogether. Plus, the networks/studios aren't going to be able to generate longterm revenues from reality television. How many repeats of Beauty and the Geek watch compared to Friends?

Reality (for the most part) is filler until the real stuff comes back. The networks can save money on it, but they won't be making much (in the long run).


But then again.. how many shows today do FRIENDS numbers... Very few if any.

And there are a good number of scripted shows that probably wont last past a 3rd season on right now.

People get sick of Scripted shows just as easy as reality shows.
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Postby Theta on Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:36 pm

RogueScribner wrote:
I find that to be the most likely scenario. Reality is filling a void right now for an entertainment starved television audience. But it can't be sustained. Eventually everything will meld into one giant reality crapfest and people will quit watching TV altogether. Plus, the networks/studios aren't going to be able to generate longterm revenues from reality television. How many repeats of Beauty and the Geek watch compared to Friends?

Reality (for the most part) is filler until the real stuff comes back. The networks can save money on it, but they won't be making much (in the long run).


They'll try, I think, but how many reality shows can you produce? You also have to wonder what IATSE thinks of all this, since it's not like reality shows are entirely non-union. If the WGA starts picketing reality show sets too, will IATSE cross?
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Postby junesquad on Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:41 pm

All I know is that I hate reality shows... they bore me. I'd just as soon go without a television.
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Postby Kagemusha on Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:58 pm

The entire biz is going to crack into two halves: one, named "What's the Internet?" will consist of old-school producers and hacks from the previous century and will gradually move to Canada and retire. The other half, known as "We Get It" will be based in Silicon Valley and will begin producing on-line content with Indy studios and deliver their writers with a percentage of the take.

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http://tinyurl.com/2fcswa
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Re: Hollywood on Strike!

Postby TheBaxter on Mon Jan 14, 2008 5:44 pm

bastard_robo wrote:
RogueScribner wrote:
The real question is whether these boffo early numbers for nonscripted shows can be maintained.

In a few months, nets will virtually run out of all original scripted programming, which means reality shows could begin cannibalizing each other -- or that viewers will get sick of all reality, all the time.



I find that to be the most likely scenario. Reality is filling a void right now for an entertainment starved television audience. But it can't be sustained. Eventually everything will meld into one giant reality crapfest and people will quit watching TV altogether. Plus, the networks/studios aren't going to be able to generate longterm revenues from reality television. How many repeats of Beauty and the Geek watch compared to Friends?

Reality (for the most part) is filler until the real stuff comes back. The networks can save money on it, but they won't be making much (in the long run).


But then again.. how many shows today do FRIENDS numbers... Very few if any.

And there are a good number of scripted shows that probably wont last past a 3rd season on right now.

People get sick of Scripted shows just as easy as reality shows.


i can't agree with this. reality, as a whole, just gets very tired after a while. there's no creativity involved in it, therefore there's no chance for a really excellent reality show to come along and raise the bar and get people excited like a good scripted show can. and the shelf-life of scripted shows, in terms of reruns and dvd sales, is much greater. look at the most successful reality shows, like american idol and survivor and the bachelor. how many dvds do those shows sell? compare that to something like lost, or battlestar galactica, or heroes, and all the dvds those shows sell.

it's a hit-and-miss process for both reality and scripted shows, and there will always be more misses than hits on both sides. but in the long run, there will always be new ideas and new stories you can tell with scripted shows, and a lot more variety and thus a lot more long-term potential with that kind of programming then there is with reality tv. the reality shows and the game shows and infotainment shows will provide a short-term way for networks to plug the gaps, but even they realize that kind of programming won't keep them afloat forever.

i really don't think tv will be what drives one side or another back to the negotiating table though, it will be movies, where the studios have a lot fewer options and a lot more money at stake. i don't see sony and mgm and universal shifting to an all-documentary film lineup anytime soon.
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Re: Hollywood on Strike!

Postby Chairman Kaga on Mon Jan 14, 2008 6:11 pm

RogueScribner wrote:Except that a) the DGA and SGA guilds contracts are due to expire in the next 6 months and b) any terms the studios give the writers now, they'll have to give similar terms to the other guilds. So side deals are nice for the short term; these smaller production houses and the like can try to churn out a few more months of product in a hurry, but it'll all be moot if the DGA and/or the SGA strikes too. The studios know this and they're going to be very careful with anything they do or don't do in the next few months.


So what can the studio's long term strategy possibly be? To not give any of these unions anything and grind their revenue streams to a complete halt in 18 months? Does that sound in the least bit viable?


bastard_robo wrote:http://www.variety.com/VR1117978850.html

I've been saying it, and its finally starting to happen. The networks are showing that they really dont need the writers.... These reality shows are doing just as good if not better than the scripted shows. (hence why the WGA has been pushing for the writers of these shows to be forced into their union..)

This whole strike is going to bite them in the ass in the end...

You're kidding yourself if you think Reality Television sells anywhere near as well as scripted. "Reality" shows only do good numbers on their initial run, they don't sell well on dvd and they don't do well in syndication thus why American Idol Rewind is on a crap syndication time slot.
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Postby junesquad on Mon Jan 14, 2008 6:14 pm

I, for one, HATE reality television. I had a cable guy come to my house and I told him that there was no chance I was going to pay for television while this strike is going on....
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Postby Nordling on Mon Jan 14, 2008 6:36 pm

Yeah, no one's going to pay for reality TV. People will buy scripted television, especially if it's something like LOST or BSG. Watching reality TV on repeat is like Bill Murray in GROUNDHOG DAY when he knew all the Jeopardy answers.
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Postby Ribbons on Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:04 pm

Nordling wrote:Watching reality TV on repeat is like Bill Murray in GROUNDHOG DAY when he knew all the Jeopardy answers.


In fact in some cases, it's exactly like that :wink:
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Re: Hollywood on Strike!

Postby RogueScribner on Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:54 pm

Chairman Kaga wrote:
RogueScribner wrote:Except that a) the DGA and SGA guilds contracts are due to expire in the next 6 months and b) any terms the studios give the writers now, they'll have to give similar terms to the other guilds. So side deals are nice for the short term; these smaller production houses and the like can try to churn out a few more months of product in a hurry, but it'll all be moot if the DGA and/or the SGA strikes too. The studios know this and they're going to be very careful with anything they do or don't do in the next few months.


So what can the studio's long term strategy possibly be? To not give any of these unions anything and grind their revenue streams to a complete halt in 18 months? Does that sound in the least bit viable?



Or to settle with the WGA once and for all and be prepared to offer similar terms to the DGA and SGA so everyone can get back to work. But side deals aren't a solution: it needs to be across the board.
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Postby Theta on Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:34 pm

http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=40 959

Two more down, Spyglass and Media Rights Capital just signed interim agreements.

I like the AMPTP's response. "They're not jumping ship! We're not losing! We'll win! Right guys?! ...

Guys?"
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Postby junesquad on Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:37 pm

Hopefully this will all be over soon... Tell me when it's over.
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Re: Hollywood on Strike!

Postby Theta on Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:44 pm

Chairman Kaga wrote:
RogueScribner wrote:Except that a) the DGA and SGA guilds contracts are due to expire in the next 6 months and b) any terms the studios give the writers now, they'll have to give similar terms to the other guilds. So side deals are nice for the short term; these smaller production houses and the like can try to churn out a few more months of product in a hurry, but it'll all be moot if the DGA and/or the SGA strikes too. The studios know this and they're going to be very careful with anything they do or don't do in the next few months.


So what can the studio's long term strategy possibly be? To not give any of these unions anything and grind their revenue streams to a complete halt in 18 months? Does that sound in the least bit viable?



No, the studios are playing chicken. Essentially they're hoping that the writers go broke and are forced to go back to work.
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Re: Hollywood on Strike!

Postby junesquad on Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:35 pm

Theta wrote:
Chairman Kaga wrote:
RogueScribner wrote:Except that a) the DGA and SGA guilds contracts are due to expire in the next 6 months and b) any terms the studios give the writers now, they'll have to give similar terms to the other guilds. So side deals are nice for the short term; these smaller production houses and the like can try to churn out a few more months of product in a hurry, but it'll all be moot if the DGA and/or the SGA strikes too. The studios know this and they're going to be very careful with anything they do or don't do in the next few months.


So what can the studio's long term strategy possibly be? To not give any of these unions anything and grind their revenue streams to a complete halt in 18 months? Does that sound in the least bit viable?



No, the studios are playing chicken. Essentially they're hoping that the writers go broke and are forced to go back to work.


That's horrible. I hope the studios get bitten in the ass for their strategy.
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Postby stereosforgeeks on Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:03 pm

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Postby Leckomaniac on Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:13 pm

stereosforgeeks wrote:Studios cancel contracts.


It won't let me read the story!
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:19 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:
stereosforgeeks wrote:Studios cancel contracts.


It won't let me read the story!


here it is:

The move signals that the development of next season's programs could be in jeopardy because of the strike.
By Meg James, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
January 15, 2008
Conceding that the current television season cannot be salvaged, four major studios canceled dozens of writer contracts Monday.

The move signals that development of next season's crop of new shows also could be in jeopardy because of the 2-month-old writers strike. Typically, January marks the start of pilot season when networks order new comedies and dramas. But with writers not working, networks do not have a pool of scripts from which to choose.

20th Century Fox Television, CBS Paramount Network Television, NBC Universal and Warner Bros. Television each confirmed that they terminated development and production agreements. Such arrangements typically cost the studios $500,000 to $2 million a year per writer in order to pay them and their staffs and overhead while they develop ideas for new TV shows.

"I didn't see it coming," said Barbara Hall, a writer and producer whose credits include former CBS series "Joan of Arcadia" and "Judging Amy." ABC executives gave her the news Friday. "I am not entirely sure what their strategy is, all I know was that I was a casualty of it," she said.

It's unclear how many people will be affected by the so-called force majeure actions, which allow a studio unilaterally to cancel a writer's contract in the event of a crisis such as a strike. A production deal can involve a solo writer or a team of several people.

"The duration of the WGA strike has significantly affected our ongoing business. Regretfully, due to these changed business circumstances, we've had to end some writer/producer deals," NBC Universal said in its statement.

Overall, more than 65 deals with writers have been eliminated since Friday. ABC Studios late last week cut about 25 deals. On Monday, CBS Paramount cut 15, Fox jettisoned about 14, NBC Universal rid nearly 10, and Warner Bros. trimmed three, said people familiar with the situation.

One top studio executive said if the strike continues into February there would probably be another round of force majeure eliminations. "There are likely to be deeper cuts," said the executive, who asked not to be identified given the sensitivity of the issue.

For the studios, the terminations were in some part strategic. Payments had not been made on the contracts since November, when the Writers Guild of America went on strike. The canceled contracts mostly affected writers who may have achieved some success but were not behind the bigger hits.

By eliminating the deals now, the studios will no longer be obligated to pay the writers even if the strike ends in the next month or two. The action saves the media companies tens of millions of dollars in payments, and is the first real sign of belt-tightening caused by the strike.
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Postby stereosforgeeks on Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:21 pm

Meg James - LA Times wrote:Studios cancel TV writer contracts
The move signals that the development of next season's programs could be in jeopardy because of the strike.

By Meg James, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
January 15, 2008
Conceding that the current television season cannot be salvaged, four major studios canceled dozens of writer contracts Monday.

The move signals that development of next season's crop of new shows also could be in jeopardy because of the 2-month-old writers strike. Typically, January marks the start of pilot season when networks order new comedies and dramas. But with writers not working, networks do not have a pool of scripts from which to choose.

Related Stories
- The Strike Zone: The latest news, blogs & photos on the WGA strike

20th Century Fox Television, CBS Paramount Network Television, NBC Universal and Warner Bros. Television each confirmed that they terminated development and production agreements. Such arrangements typically cost the studios $500,000 to $2 million a year per writer in order to pay them and their staffs and overhead while they develop ideas for new TV shows.

"I didn't see it coming," said Barbara Hall, a writer and producer whose credits include former CBS series "Joan of Arcadia" and "Judging Amy." ABC executives gave her the news Friday. "I am not entirely sure what their strategy is, all I know was that I was a casualty of it," she said.

It's unclear how many people will be affected by the so-called force majeure actions, which allow a studio unilaterally to cancel a writer's contract in the event of a crisis such as a strike. A production deal can involve a solo writer or a team of several people.

"The duration of the WGA strike has significantly affected our ongoing business. Regretfully, due to these changed business circumstances, we've had to end some writer/producer deals," NBC Universal said in its statement.

Overall, more than 65 deals with writers have been eliminated since Friday. ABC Studios late last week cut about 25 deals. On Monday, CBS Paramount cut 15, Fox jettisoned about 14, NBC Universal rid nearly 10, and Warner Bros. trimmed three, said people familiar with the situation.

One top studio executive said if the strike continues into February there would probably be another round of force majeure eliminations. "There are likely to be deeper cuts," said the executive, who asked not to be identified given the sensitivity of the issue.

For the studios, the terminations were in some part strategic. Payments had not been made on the contracts since November, when the Writers Guild of America went on strike. The canceled contracts mostly affected writers who may have achieved some success but were not behind the bigger hits.

By eliminating the deals now, the studios will no longer be obligated to pay the writers even if the strike ends in the next month or two. The action saves the media companies tens of millions of dollars in payments, and is the first real sign of belt-tightening caused by the strike.

meg.james@latimes.com
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Postby stereosforgeeks on Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:21 pm

Damn you Moo!

Make me feel redundant why dont ya.
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Postby Leckomaniac on Tue Jan 15, 2008 4:22 pm

Has the DGA reached a deal with the AMPTP?

What does that mean for the WGA's strike?

[quote="Unitedhollywood.com"] DGA Deal To Be Announced Tomorrow?

This is still a rumor, but it's definitely gaining steam -- word is spreading that the DGA has finalized a deal with the congloms, and will announce the deal tomorrow.

We don't know what the terms of the deal will be, if indeed it does exist. We're not going to speculate because, if it's true, we'll find out the specifics soon enough.

But we over at UH will make one suggestion: everyone stay calm. That's the only way we can really be prepared for the unexpected -- is to stop expecting anything.

When and if the DGA announces their deal, it will take some time for all of us to analyze the terms of that deal and see if they're acceptable to us as a guild or not. We're inevitably going to argue and disagree; we'll need to do it civilly, and calmly.

If they have made a deal, remember the WGA is not bound to whatever the DGA has committed to; however, the DGA deal can be used as a template to jumpstart our negotiations with the corporations. We certainly won't get less than what the DGA gets; that's how pattern bargaining works.

The one thing I think we can say for certain is that there will be aspects of any deal -- even one we negotiated ourselves -- that will be painful and disappointing for all of us. The roller-coaster emotions of the strike can be devastating. Whatever happens, we have to ride it out, think clearly, argue and discuss -- and then make the best decision we can, for our Guild and for the town.

UPDATED 8:40 p.m.
The cutting of even more overall deals could be seen to support the contention that the DGA and AMPTP are about to announce a deal. The following is reprinted from today's Variety:

Citing fallout from the WGA strike, Warner Bros. TV, CBS Paramount Network TV, Universal Media Studios and 20th Century Fox TV have decided to follow the lead of ABC Studios by terminating a big batch of deals.

At 20th, about 15 pacts have been shed, while insiders describe the Warner Bros. cuts as less than a half-dozen so far. CBS Par has trimmed more than a half-dozen deals (though it has a much smaller roster from which to cut).
No word yet on the extent of the NBC U cuts. ABC Studios slashed nearly two dozen deals on Friday.

Agents around town began getting calls and letters from studio execs on Monday afternoon.

Among the scribes and producers cut from the CBS Par roster: Mark Johnson, John McNamara, Rene Echevarria, Barry Schindel, Jennifer Levin and the team of Sivert Glarum and Michael Jamin. Eye unit has also scrapped its pact with Hugh Jackman's company, which recently produced "Viva Laughlin."

Among the departed at 20th: Jonathan Lisco, whose fall drama "K-Ville" was canceled by Fox, and the team of Gretchen Berg and Aaron Harberts ("Pepper Dennis"). They're staffers on a show that will return, "Women's Murder Club," but will no longer be developing new projects for the studio. Other scribes let go include Larry Kaplow ("K-Ville") and Paul Redford ("Journeyman").

Studios issued statements Monday blaming the cuts on the strike. “Production companies in the entertainment industry continue to feel the impact of the ongoing writers strike,â€
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Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:19 pm

The DGA and the AMPTP have reached an agreement.

And it looks like they have asked the WGA back to the table.

The storm clouds may be parting.
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Postby TonyWilson on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:29 pm

So can someone who knows tell me if that's a good deal for the DGA? If it goes through have they got a substantial victory on their hands?
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Postby DaleTremont on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:30 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:The DGA and the AMPTP have reached an agreement.

And it looks like they have asked the WGA back to the table.

The storm clouds may be parting.


Not necessarily. From what I've heard it could just further fracture the WGA camp into those who think they should accept terms set by the DGA or hold out.

It'd be nice to get things back to normal (even though I do enjoy honking every time I drive by studio gates to show my support!)
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Postby lyra belacqua on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:36 pm

TonyWilson wrote:So can someone who knows tell me if that's a good deal for the DGA? If it goes through have they got a substantial victory on their hands?


What he said.

And feel free to explain it like I'm not someone who understands it all in the first place.
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Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:37 pm

TonyWilson wrote:So can someone who knows tell me if that's a good deal for the DGA? If it goes through have they got a substantial victory on their hands?


Well, there were no rollbacks...so they didn't take any percentage point hits, which is certainly a victory. And they were given a share of the new media (Internet and what have you), which was the main point of friction, but there is a 17 day period for promotion where they will not be paid. It is an interesting compromise...to be sure. And the 3% number seems a bit small. I don't know. It isn't a huge victory, but it is something. And the deal is only in place for three years.

EDIT: Having more thoroughly looked through this agreement I don't see this being satisfying to the WGA. The Internet download rate has a cap on it. It has to reach a certain level of units downloaded before the new residuals kick in. Couple that with the 17 day grace period for ad supported streaming and this is a pretty weak agreement.
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Postby TonyWilson on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:43 pm

Cheers, Lecko. I guess the writers will have to fold now.
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Postby TonyWilson on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:44 pm

Cheers, Lecko. I guess the writers will have to fold now.
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Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:45 pm

One thing I think does stand out as a clear victory is this portion:

Payments for EST will be based on distributor's gross, which is the amount received by the entity responsible for distributing the film or television program on the Internet. Having distributor’s gross as the residuals basis was a key point in our negotiations.

The companies are now contractually obligated to give us unfettered access to their deals and data. This access is new and unprecedented and creates a transparency that has never existed before. Additionally, if the exhibitor or retailer is part of the producer's corporate family, we have improved provisions for challenging any suspect transactions.


It is now in the contract that studios have to allow the Guild access to their data. That is a major win considering how notorious studios and their bookkeeping are.
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Postby TonyWilson on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:51 pm

Oh shit yeh, that's very good news. I like it.
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Postby TonyWilson on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:51 pm

Oh shit yeh, that's very good news. I like it.
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Postby King Psyz on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:56 pm

Tony is fluffing?


Tony is fluffing?


But seriously, I hope this ends this whole debacle and this urges the end of production on that horrible DB movie.
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Postby TonyWilson on Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:58 pm

Oh shit. How did that happen.
















(i'm fluffing that's how)
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Postby King Psyz on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:01 pm

it was so nice, you had to post it twice?
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Postby TonyWilson on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:03 pm

thats my story now and im sticking to it.
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Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:06 pm

The more I think about it the more I feel like the DGA significantly undercut the WGA. This deal has essentially taking out the WGA strike at the knees. I have to imagine this is going to cause some strife between the DGA and WGA.
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Postby instant_karma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:23 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:The more I think about it the more I feel like the DGA significantly undercut the WGA. This deal has essentially taking out the WGA strike at the knees. I have to imagine this is going to cause some strife between the DGA and WGA.


Yeah, that's what I was thinking as well. I guess a lot is now resting on the SAG position.
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Postby Theta on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:33 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:The more I think about it the more I feel like the DGA significantly undercut the WGA. This deal has essentially taking out the WGA strike at the knees. I have to imagine this is going to cause some strife between the DGA and WGA.


I don't think so, actually. Director residuals are structured quite a bit differently from writing residuals, and the DGA got some concessions that are unprecedented to say the least. That the studios have become willing to agree to a more open accounting process, one based on gross, no less, is, to me, a sign of desperation. They have to give that to the WGA now, and to say residuals accounting is more contentious among the writers is putting that mildly.

I suspect the DGA took advantage of the strike to inform the AMPTP that basically, whenever the writer's strike ended, if they didn't come across, it wouldn't matter; they'd strike and there'd be another six months of inactivity. The AMPTP took a look at what that would do to profits and caved.


Also consider that the SAG is practically guaranteed to strike unless they get a chunk of Internet revenues, too. So the DGA has forced open the door to the issue; they can't back off now. The WGA will reach for more I think. This might be the beginning of the end, but the end is still a few weeks off, methinks.
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Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:44 pm

Theta wrote:
Leckomaniac wrote:The more I think about it the more I feel like the DGA significantly undercut the WGA. This deal has essentially taking out the WGA strike at the knees. I have to imagine this is going to cause some strife between the DGA and WGA.


I don't think so, actually. Director residuals are structured quite a bit differently from writing residuals, and the DGA got some concessions that are unprecedented to say the least. That the studios have become willing to agree to a more open accounting process, one based on gross, no less, is, to me, a sign of desperation. They have to give that to the WGA now, and to say residuals accounting is more contentious among the writers is putting that mildly.

I suspect the DGA took advantage of the strike to inform the AMPTP that basically, whenever the writer's strike ended, if they didn't come across, it wouldn't matter; they'd strike and there'd be another six months of inactivity. The AMPTP took a look at what that would do to profits and caved.


Also consider that the SAG is practically guaranteed to strike unless they get a chunk of Internet revenues, too. So the DGA has forced open the door to the issue; they can't back off now. The WGA will reach for more I think. This might be the beginning of the end, but the end is still a few weeks off, methinks.


Well, I still think that had the DGA held off on making this deal they could have put pressure on the AMPTP to concede to the WGA's demands. As it stands, I don't see the WGA getting a better deal than this. Furthermore, with the DGA signing a deal...the WGA looks bad publicly the longer they hold out. The person on the street thinks "well the Director's signed, why are the writer's being so greedy".

I think it is undeniable that the DGA signing this deal has undermined the efforts of the WGA. The DGA saw an opportunity and they took it. I get that it isn't their job to look out for the WGA...so I understand why they did it, but I don't see how this helps the WGA in anyway.

I think a deal will be forthcoming, but it is going to be a weak one.
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Postby King Psyz on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:09 pm

Well considering the WGA fucked over the whole industry and didn't care who lost their jobs or were otu of work, in their union or in another, I don't see where they could even suggest the DGA fucked them over here.
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Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:11 pm

King Psyz wrote:Well considering the WGA fucked over the whole industry and didn't care who lost their jobs or were otu of work, in their union or in another, I don't see where they could even suggest the DGA fucked them over here.



:!: :?: :shock:





:roll:


I guess that's one way to look at it.
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Postby RogueScribner on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:11 pm

Yeah, but I don't think the WGA wants just a 3 year deal. We could be back here in 2011. I think the WGA will hold out for terms that will be good for them for at least 5 years, if not longer. The DGA just seemed to leverage the current strike in their favor for short term gains. I doubt the SAG will do the same.
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:12 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:
King Psyz wrote:Well considering the WGA fucked over the whole industry and didn't care who lost their jobs or were otu of work, in their union or in another, I don't see where they could even suggest the DGA fucked them over here.



:!: :?: :shock:





:roll:


I guess that's one way to look at it.


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Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:13 pm

Lord Voldemoo wrote:
Leckomaniac wrote:
King Psyz wrote:Well considering the WGA fucked over the whole industry and didn't care who lost their jobs or were otu of work, in their union or in another, I don't see where they could even suggest the DGA fucked them over here.



:!: :?: :shock:





:roll:


I guess that's one way to look at it.


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