The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

All the dirt. All the top secret stuff. Anything that has to do with the process of getting us to sit and watch something projected on the big screen.

Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jan 15, 2010 12:50 pm

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DUNE in Stereoscopic 3D?

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jan 29, 2010 8:56 pm

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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jan 30, 2010 5:04 pm

From IGN:
Dune's New Messiah
Scott Collura wrote:"We're starting from scratch," says Morel. "Peter had an approach which was not mine at all, and we're starting over again. I don't think we're going to keep any elements of the Peter Berg script. It was good, actually. It was interesting. It was just not our vision. I can't tell you right now [who's writing it with me], it's going to be official next week. The deals are not done!"

The helmer does confirm that right now and for the next couple of months he will be focusing on developing Dune, and that he and his mystery scribes will start writing the screenplay in early February. Still, he seems cautious when talking about it -- as if he doesn't want to jinx his good fortune of landing the project.
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Re: DUNE in Stereoscopic 3D?

Postby TheBaxter on Sat Jan 30, 2010 5:06 pm



where is the "hitting yourself in the head with a hammer" smiley when you need it?
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Re: DUNE in Stereoscopic 3D?

Postby MacCready on Sun Jan 31, 2010 11:10 am




How about a script that doesn't blow?
For a change?
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Re: DUNE in Stereoscopic 3D?

Postby TheBaxter on Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:30 pm

MacCready wrote:



How about a script that doesn't blow?
For a change?


here's the script so far...

a ship comes out of the distance... IN 3D!!!
then it lands on a planet called dune... IN 3D!!!!
then a worm jumps out of the sand... IN 3D!!!!!
then someone throws some spice towards teh camera... IN 3D!!!!!!!!1
then people jump around and do stuff for another 2 hours... IN 3D!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11111111

thanks to all the people paying for quadruple-priced tickets to see stuff pop out at them from the screen, it will nearly double the box office of lynch's dune movie and be declared a box office phenomenon, which will ensure the making of the sequel...

dune deux... IN 3D!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!111111111111!lllllllllllX
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby MacCready on Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:38 pm

And that's a wrap, folks.



The Spice won't be the only thing flowing.....
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Tyrone_Shoelaces on Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:39 pm

I wonder if there's any chance of a Lynch cameo in this one too.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Tue Feb 02, 2010 5:45 am

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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Thu Feb 11, 2010 8:00 pm

From THR:
'Dune' film finds a new writer - Chase Palmer to work on script for helmer Pierre Morel
Jay A. Fernandez wrote:Chase Palmer has been hired to work on the "Dune" script for director Pierre Morel at Paramount.

Morel came aboard the project at the beginning of the year, and Palmer will work Morel's ideas into original scribe Josh Zetumer's screenplay. The "From Paris With Love" and "Taken" helmer is intent on hewing close to the source material, Frank Herbert's classic 1965 sci-fi tome.

David Lynch adapted the first novel into a feature for Universal in 1984.

Kevin Misher and Richard Rubinstein are producing the new Paramount version, which they hope will spark a franchise.

Repped by WME and the Gotham Group, Palmer is developing his original screenplays "Number Thirteen," with producer Gail Mutrux at Pretty Pictures, and "Wild Wild East," with producer Paul Schiff. He would direct both as well.

Palmer also has worked on the screenplays for "No Blood, No Guts, No Glory" for Misher at Paramount and "The Dallas Buyer's Club" at Universal.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Hermanator X on Wed Mar 10, 2010 5:26 pm

Any lucky UKers anywhere near plymouth? LINK


Alejandro Jodorowsky’s “Dune”:

An Exhibition of a Film of a Book That Never Was

2 April – 16 May

Steven Claydon, Matthew Day Jackson and Vidya Gastaldon

with material by Moebius, H R Giger and Chris Foss

Curated by Tom Morton

An Exhibition of a Film of a Book That Never Was takes as its departure from the cult Chilean film-maker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s attempted 1976 adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic science fiction novel Dune. This exhibition includes production drawings made by Moebius, H R Giger and Chris Foss alongside commissioned work made in response by three international contemporary artists: Steven Claydon, Matthew Day Jackson and Vidya Gastaldon.

Following the release of his mystical Western El Topo (1970) and Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky embarked on his Dune project, gathering around him a group of collaborators that included the French comics artist Moebius, the Swiss artist
H R Giger (who would later design the 1979 film Alien), the British science fiction artist Chris Foss, and the British band Pink Floyd, who would provide the soundtrack. Unable to secure the money from Hollywood to create the Dune of his imagination, Jodorowsky abandoned the film before a single frame was shot. All that survives of this project is Jodorowsky’s extensive notes and the production drawings of Moebius, Giger and Foss.

These reveal a potential future for science fiction movie-making that eschewed the conservative technology-based approach of American film-makers in favour of something closer to a metaphysical fever-dream. This was, though, a future that would never take place. In 1977, George Lucas’ Star Wars was released and the history of science fiction film-making, and even mainstream cinema, would never be the same again...

Dune’s themes of jihad, resource war and environmental degradation are especially pertinent to our current political moment, and the exhibition also seeks to explore the notion of adaptation and counterfactual histories of film. The exhibition brings together the original production drawings for Dune and Moebius’ storyboards for Jodorowsky’s script alongside new works by Steve Claydon, Matthew Day Jackson and Vidya Gastaldon developed in reaction to Jodorowsky’s notes on Dune - an extraordinary mixture of mystical pronouncement, philosophical speculation on the nature of authorship, cultural criticism and 70s film gossip.

This exhibition is a touring exhibition from The Drawing Room. The project is guest-curated by Tom Morton, Curator at the Hayward, London, Co-curator of The British Art Show 7
(2010 -11)and Contributing Editor, frieze magazine.
...and so forth.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby so sorry on Wed Mar 10, 2010 5:57 pm

Hermanator X wrote:Any lucky UKers anywhere near plymouth? LINK


Alejandro Jodorowsky’s “Dune”:

An Exhibition of a Film of a Book That Never Was

2 April – 16 May

Steven Claydon, Matthew Day Jackson and Vidya Gastaldon

with material by Moebius, H R Giger and Chris Foss

Curated by Tom Morton

An Exhibition of a Film of a Book That Never Was takes as its departure from the cult Chilean film-maker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s attempted 1976 adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic science fiction novel Dune. This exhibition includes production drawings made by Moebius, H R Giger and Chris Foss alongside commissioned work made in response by three international contemporary artists: Steven Claydon, Matthew Day Jackson and Vidya Gastaldon.

Following the release of his mystical Western El Topo (1970) and Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky embarked on his Dune project, gathering around him a group of collaborators that included the French comics artist Moebius, the Swiss artist
H R Giger (who would later design the 1979 film Alien), the British science fiction artist Chris Foss, and the British band Pink Floyd, who would provide the soundtrack. Unable to secure the money from Hollywood to create the Dune of his imagination, Jodorowsky abandoned the film before a single frame was shot. All that survives of this project is Jodorowsky’s extensive notes and the production drawings of Moebius, Giger and Foss.

These reveal a potential future for science fiction movie-making that eschewed the conservative technology-based approach of American film-makers in favour of something closer to a metaphysical fever-dream. This was, though, a future that would never take place. In 1977, George Lucas’ Star Wars was released and the history of science fiction film-making, and even mainstream cinema, would never be the same again...

Dune’s themes of jihad, resource war and environmental degradation are especially pertinent to our current political moment, and the exhibition also seeks to explore the notion of adaptation and counterfactual histories of film. The exhibition brings together the original production drawings for Dune and Moebius’ storyboards for Jodorowsky’s script alongside new works by Steve Claydon, Matthew Day Jackson and Vidya Gastaldon developed in reaction to Jodorowsky’s notes on Dune - an extraordinary mixture of mystical pronouncement, philosophical speculation on the nature of authorship, cultural criticism and 70s film gossip.

This exhibition is a touring exhibition from The Drawing Room. The project is guest-curated by Tom Morton, Curator at the Hayward, London, Co-curator of The British Art Show 7
(2010 -11)and Contributing Editor, frieze magazine.



That sounds like a ton of fun.

Speaking of a ton of fun, can you imagine what a meeting was like between all those freaky deaky guys? Jeebus, I can't even fathom the amount of drugs that must have been involved!


I wonder if he had gone thru with it would it have turned out more like Flash Gordon or more like Aliens...
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Sep 03, 2010 6:55 pm

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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby minstrel on Fri Sep 03, 2010 8:33 pm

TheButcher wrote:From Coming Soon:
Jock's Dune Concept Art Online


That actually sucks.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby so sorry on Fri Sep 03, 2010 8:55 pm

minstrel wrote:
TheButcher wrote:From Coming Soon:
Jock's Dune Concept Art Online


That actually sucks.

I don't think they sucked. Don't think they were anything special either. But not sucky.
Just kinda... there. Need more dammit!

Come on butcher, dig deeper into your interwebs bag of tricks!
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby judderman on Mon Sep 06, 2010 3:54 pm

I don't think more is gonna help. Giger's concept art pretty much sold it on the first image. Same for Fosse. SoSorry is right. That was just... there.

What happened to Ralph McQuarrie?
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:46 am

DEADLINE EXCLUSIVE: Sands Of Time Running Out For New 'Dune'
Mike Fleming wrote:A ticking clock situation is playing out at Paramount Pictures over the sci-fi classic Dune, one that is emblematic of how studio infatuation for branded fare has brought with it the added burden of pleasing rights holders who not only get gross deals but also a big say in how movies are made and released.

Rumors raced recently that Paramount would end four years of development on the Frank Herbert novel by putting the project in turnaround. I'm told that's not true, but the studio will be done with Dune by next spring if it hasn't firmed a production start by then. The rights holders won't grant another option extension. Armed with a new Dune draft by Chase Palmer, the studio and producers Kevin Misher and Richard P. Rubinstein are going out to directors today to create a new movie out of the 1965 book that is reputed to be the biggest selling science fiction novel ever. Despite the ticking clock, Paramount is proceeding as cautiously as it would on any project that will carry a price-tag well north of $100 million. Unless studio brass is absolutely confident by the time the buzzer goes off, Paramount will kiss the project goodbye. It will forfeit the six figures it has paid in option costs and risk development costs, though it could recoup some of the latter if another backer embraces the script Paramount paid Palmer to write.

These rights-holder chess games are playing out all over town. For instance: the start dates of Spider-Man, Ghost Rider and development of other Marvel Comics character reboots are influenced by the knowledge that those properties will revert to Marvel and its Disney owners if specific deadlines aren't met; Superman is being raced into production by Warner Bros because certain rights revert back to the heirs of creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in 2013; Universal’s deals with board game owner Hasbro includes stiff multi-million dollar penalties if deadlines aren’t met, though the toymaker waived its right to a $5 million penalty payment when Universal pushed the start of the mega-budget Battleship back one full year because it was such a massive logistical undertaking.

Though the estate of Robert Ludlum has also put pressure on Universal to mount another installment of the cash cow Bourne Identity franchise, the estate showed flexibility recently after it tried to supplement its movie income with a series pilot deal with CBS that had CSI creator Anthony Zuiker to hatch Treadstone, a drama revolving around the shadowy government organization whose brainwashing techniques turned operatives like Jason Bourne into remorseless assassins. I'm told that before original Bourne Identity scribe Tony Gilroy would sign on to direct the spinoff movie The Bourne Legacy (which also treads on Treadstone mythology), the TV series had to be back-burnered or the movie wouldn't have happened. No one’s saying exactly what will happen to the series, but between calls made by me and my colleague Nellie Andreeva (Nellie broke the TV deal story), we are confident a hot project has cooled.

Despite Dune's outsized book sales, Paramount can hardly be blamed for being careful. The 1965 book still sells, sequel books by the author's son Brian and Kevin Anderson routinely hit the bestseller lists, there are videogames and a SciFi Channel miniseries was a big success. But from a feature standpoint, the book is indelibly linked to a 1984 David Lynch-directed flop, and there is that lingering memory of a giant desert worm and the rocker Sting, clad only in what seemed like a blue diaper, menacing star Kyle MacLachlan. The new film has been re-imagined but deals with the same trippy concept, an interplanetary battle for control of the desert planet Arrakis and its supply of the spice Melange. Those who ingest Melange live longer, have a prescient sense of awareness, and the substance is necessary for space travel.

Rubinstein and his company New Amsterdam made the successful Dune miniseries and he is the liaison to the rights holders, which are the Herbert estate and ABC. Director Peter Berg spent several years developing a script with writer Josh Zetumer, before Berg left to direct Battleship. Palmer then rewrote that script under the supervision of Taken helmer Pierre Morel. It appears that Morel has stepped off the project. He'll be an exec producer, though Rubinstein -- who said the estate and studio have to be in agreement on a director -- likes Morel for the job.

Rubinstein said he and the estate will be is okay whether Paramount moves forward or not, because he and Misher have such a strong script now. But he makes it clear Paramount will have to be ready to fish or cut bait by next spring. “We don’t want to extend an option and watch the studio take seven years,” he said. “This is on a short tether. It's a major book franchise, you can’t walk into a store and not see a shelf full of Dune books.”

Fredrik Malmberg, the Paradox CEO who controls the rights of the Robert E. Howard-directed Conan the Barbarian, knows first hand the frustrating of working at a studio's pace. He went through seven years of futility at Warner Bros with directors as Larry and Andy Wachowski, Robert Rodriguez and original director John Milius, before shocking the studio in 2007 and refusing to give them another option. Instead, he put auctioned the property and made a 2007 deal with Millennium Films that paid $1 million a year. Three years later, the picture is wrapped. It's a 3D film that cost more than $60 million, directed by director Marcus Nispel and starring Jason Momoa as the title character. Millennium, which is releasing through Lionsgate, just set an August 19, 2011 date. Malmberg said he has no regrets over pulling back the property. While he believed Warner Bros was trying, he finally tired of having no answer to the question asked over and over by shareholders: where is the movie?

"I definitely think it was worth it," Malmberg told me. "Studios are making bigger and bigger films, they are such huge gambles that it is hard to get a green light. If you are a brand holder, you have to be strong on the deal and strong as a producer, and be willing to move on unless you’ve got strict progress to production language. After waiting seven years at Warner Bros, we went to an indie sector that is eager to get into the branded space. You can have more say in the process than you usually get at a studio, unless you come in with a big financial component the way that Marvel did. Would this have been bigger at Warner Bros? Hindsight is always easy. I will tell you I’m happy. The movie looks great, it was the biggest bet Millennium has ever made on a film, and Lionsgate is very motivated. Ultimately, I had to answer to my investors and shareholders. I defended Warner Bros as long as I could, but I had to take back the property even though it was hard and there were bruised feelings."
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Tue Mar 22, 2011 10:49 pm

DEADLINE EXCLUSIVE:
Paramount Ends 4-Year Attempt To Turn Frank Herbert's 'Dune' Into Film Franchise
Paramount has turned loose the giant worm, and everything else that was part of the seminal Frank Herbert science fiction novel series Dune. The studio’s four-year attempt to make a movie out of the franchise has fallen by the wayside. Paramount and the rights holders came to a parting of the ways as the rights lapsed. “Paramount’s option has expired and we couldn’t reach an agreement,” said Richard P. Rubinstein, who controls the rights to what is considered the biggest-selling science fiction book ever. “I’m going to look at my options, and whether I wind up taking the script we developed in turnaround, or start over, I’m not sure yet.”

Dune tells the story of an interplanetary battle for control of the desert planet Arrakis and its supply of Melange, a spice that can be ingested. Those who take it live longer and have a prescient sense of awareness. The substance is necessary for space travel. The book was turned into a 1984 flop by David Lynch, but a miniseries that came later fared better.

Rubinstein said that Paramount’s exit came down to dollars, but the producer said he and the rights holders were OK with it. “Sure, it’s frustrating, how long this has taken, but most of what I’ve done that worked out well over the years, like the miniseries The Stand, took a long time,” Rubinstein said. “Since I know what I want, eventually, I’ll find someone who’ll agree with me. What I like is that talent has interesting things to say on how they would approach it.” Rubinstein had been producing with Kevin Misher, but everything’s up in the air at the moment. “Right now, Dune has no commitments or attachments,” he said. Rubinstein and his company New Amsterdam made the Dune miniseries, and he is the gatekeeper for the rights on behalf of the author’s estate and ABC. Even though Pete Berg dropped out to do Battleship, Dune for a time looked like it had a fighting chance. Rubinstein and Misher quite liked the job that Taken helmer Pierre Morel did in collaborating with Chase Palmer. They managed to get a script that cut the mammoth subject matter down to a compelling story that could be told at feature length. Rubinstein said that he would probably re-approach Morel and Palmer, but those conversations haven’t yet happened. All they now need is a financier ready to put up the $100 million or so in production budget needed to get the film under way. If they do use the Palmer script, Paramount stands to recoup some of its development costs.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Pacino86845 on Wed Mar 23, 2011 10:53 am

In a parallel universe, Jodorowsky would get this project back in his hands. Someone should put all those old timers in charge... Jodorowsky, Giger and Moebius are all still sharp as tacks. They'd show those whippersnappers how it's done! Too bad Dali's dead, though.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Al Shut on Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:50 pm

Come to think of it, I've never seen Jodorowsky doing something with a narrative that made logical sense.
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Re: 'Jodorowsky's Dune'

Postby TheButcher on Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:29 am

Q&A: 'Jodorowsky's Dune' Explores the Unmade Space Epic That Paved the Way for 'Star Wars'
Director Frank Pavich explains how the trippy and artful masterpiece would have changed the course of Hollywood blockbusters forever.
Chris O'Falt wrote:It's hard to imagine any producer today watching Alejandro Jodorowsky's bizarre and formally experimental El Topo and The Holy Mountain and thinking he would be the perfect candidate to direct a big budget version of Frank Herbert's sci-fi classic novel Dune.

But that's exactly what happened when Jodorowsky's producer Michel Seydoux made a profit off Holy Mountain, which catching the drug-fueled midnight movie craze of the early 1970s. For two years, Jodorowsky courted an eclectic crew of collaborators, including Salvador Dali, Mick Jagger, Orson Welles, and Pink Floyd. He also gathered a collection of lesser-known visual artists (Chris Foss, Jean 'Moebius' Giraud, H.R. Giger and Dan O'Bannon) in Paris to design every shot, costume, spaceship and special effect.

Although this work never made it to the big screen, it was collected in an enormous bookthat Jodorowsky and Seydoux brought to Hollywood to pitch their movie. Later, the legend of Jodorowsky's unmade Dune grew when his team went to Hollywood to make Alien.

Frank Pavich's new documentary, Jodorowsky's Dune, chronicles the Quixotic venture of exhaustively prepping a film that never got made. It's not a depressing tale of failure, however, but rather a surprisingly inspirational tale of creativity, movie making and dreaming big.

Pavich talked to The Hollywood Reporter about how he tracked down Jodorowsky, the influence the filmmaker had on Hollywood and how blockbusters of today would have been different had it ever been made.

Chris O'Falt wrote:THR:
How did you first hear about Jodorowsky's failed Dune project?

Frank Pavich:

The fact of this amazing lost film has always been floating around in the ether. Probably the first time I ever heard of it was in one of those 50 Great Films Never Made books, all these alternate universe movies. Like Richard Dreyfus was going to be in Total Recall and Raiders of the Lost Ark was going to star Tom Selleck. You kind of flip through those things and the one that always stands out the most is Jodorowsky's Dune because not only is it a lost movie, but it also is the one that is still alive. People say [Stanley] Kubrick's Napolean is the greatest movie never made, but when it didn't happen the road kind of ended there. While with Jodorowsky's stuff we can see that it still lives on into 2014 and beyond.

THR:
How'd you go about chasing down the story?

FP:

I started with the top guy. I said, if I can't get Jodorowsky then there's no point in anything. I started searching around online until I found out he has an agent in Spain. I had no idea where he was living. I knew he was Chilean and spent time in Mexico and spent time in Paris and in New York. So I sent out this email and a few weeks later I received an email, not from the agent, but from Alejandro Jodorowsky! Which is terrifying and exciting, so much so that I left it closed for a week. He could have been saying, "No, leave me alone," or the worst thing, "I'm already working with someone." I left it closed for a week and lived in my fantasy world that I was going to meet him and make the film.

After a week, I opened it up and it was a very short message from him, basically saying, "I understand you are looking for me, I live in Paris and if you want to speak to me about this project you need to come to Paris and we need to meet face-to-face." What's better than getting an invitation to Jodorowsky's home? So I went right to Paris and sat down with him and excitedly, and probably over-enthusiastically, pitched my idea to him. He was into it right from the start.

THR:
One of the most entertaining parts of the film is when Nicolas Winding Refen (Drive, Only God Forgives) talks about Jodorowsky personally walking him through the famous Dune book and says that he felt like he'd watched the movie. Did you ever get walked through the storyboards and drawing and have that kind of experience?

FP:

I don't think that my walk through the book was like Refen's. We sat with the book and he'd show us certain things and we had plenty of time ourselves to photograph it and study it and decide what we were going to animate, but I don't think our walkthrough was as magical as Refen's sounds like.

THR:
But did you walk away from this project feeling like you had experienced the movie?

FP:

For sure, probably more than anybody besides the key collaborators, because we had so much time to study it. We studied the screenplay and compared it to the art work. It was in our deep study of it when these ideas started to pop out: "Oh my god, this scene is familiar from this famous movie, this scene ended up in that film." We never would have had those revelations had we not had the time and full access.

THR:
How narrative was the film going to be? Considering he has this surrealist background and certainly some of the visuals are far out there, is there a backbone in this script of a fairly standard narrative?

FP:

Yeah. I suppose it sort of depends on how narrative you feel Dune the book itself is. I know some people like to say, "Oh he was just taking the name Dune and making his own film," but that's not true. You look through the screenplay or the storyboard book, it's the novel Dune, it's completely that story, with some Jodorowsky flourishes of course -- cameras going through vaginas, which just kind of adds to the story. But it is the real narrative structure of the novel for sure.

THR:
The doc posits that, with all the work Jodorowsky did with his collaborators, this film was fully realized in a way that other unproduced movies aren't. From a filmmaking standpoint, what were some of your challenges in trying to bring that to life and letting your audience experience this realized movie world?

FP:

Films fall apart every single day -- that's certainly nothing new and nothing special. But the fact that this was fully realized, that they told and designed the entire story, that’s what was special and made us feel we could tell this story. While they never rolled any film or got to set, the movie existed on paper, so we knew if we could get inside that book then we could show everybody what the film would have been like.

One of the challenges was how do we tell the story as a worthwhile feature documentary and not a DVD extra? I think if we had concentrated on, "Oh, how cool his Dune would have been," then that's a DVD extra. But when you add his personality, the story becomes bigger. It becomes about ambition. It becomes about this spiritual quest. So when we went through the book and decided what to animate it wasn't just simply picking the wildest scenes, but also picking scenes that would work with our narrative structure. Each scene we choose had to represent something bigger, it needed to represent something of the greater quest of what he was going after.

THR:
Was there something from the start that was a little unrealistic about this venture, in the sense that this was a big-budget sci-fi movie being made by a surrealist director?

FP:

I think that's really interesting because people kind of snicker at it and say, "Of course, the guy who made El Topo and Holy Mountain, walking into Warner Bros and Fox with this giant book of art, trying to make this big budget space opera, of course they said no." But he was truly ahead of his time. At that time, what was there in the realm of science fiction, there was 2001 and schlocky B-movies and that was it. It wasn't the world we live in now. This is all pre-Star Wars. You have to remember when George Lucas and Gary Kurtz were making Star Wars at Fox, Fox wasn't really behind the film. They didn't understand who was going to see a science fiction movie. That of course is how Lucas got to become a billionaire, because he was like, "Oh, I want to make toys, I want to market this," and they were like, '"Great, take the rights, knock yourself out, no one is going to buy this garbage." Who knew that when Star Wars came out it would change the film culture and create a whole new thing. Suddenly, science fiction became financially viable.

So then less than ten years after Jodorowsky walks in with his version of Dune, the studios say, "We need another science fiction movie, let's go back to Dune." And who do they get to direct it? Not the equivalent of Michael Bay of the mid-80s, but the equivalent of Alejandro Jodorowsky -- they hire David Lynch, whose film credits essentially at the time were The Elephant Man and Eraserhead. So they went back to this weird, surrealistic source material and found another weird, surrealistic, off-the-wall director, but they think, "Oh this will be fantastic and let's make action figures and Topps trading cards and coloring books for kids because nothing says a movie for kids like David Lynch's Dune." What colors came with that coloring book? Three shades of brown? The were blinded by money. When Jodorowsky first tried to make Dune they thought they'd lose all their money and then in the mid-80s they were blinded by the idea they could make millions of dollars. Was there something from the start that was a little unrealistic about this venture, in the sense that this was a big-budget sci-fi movie being made by a surrealist director?

THR:
What if Jodorowsky had made Dune and it came out before Star Wars, what do you think would have happened?

FP:

Let's say that his Dune had been completed and had been released, for better or worse, for success or for failure, it changes everything. If a big-budget, surrealistic science fiction film is a success then I think the studios and people with money say, "Oh this is worthwhile." Just like when Star Wars was a success, everyone wanted to make a sci-fi film. Maybe had Jodorowsky's film come out and been a success everybody would have wanted to do a weird, psychedelic space movie. Maybe those would be more popular today. Maybe the big studio tent poles would be weird, off the wall films.

But, had Jodorowsky's Dune come out and been an abysmal failure, let's say it didn't make any money and sunk a studio, then you have Fox, who was working with Lucas on Star Wars, they of course were already not really behind it and looking for any excuse to pull the plug on that film. Once you pull the plug on Star Wars and that never happens then what happens to the film landscape? What are we looking at today? What would the big films be, who knows what the big tentpole films would be? Maybe they wouldn't be aimed at kids as much as they seem to be now.

THR:
The end of the doc addresses the influence this unmade film did have. There's the obvious connection between Jodorowsky's collaborators going on to make Alien and working in Hollywood. The film though also draws a direct connection between conventions and film language that were in Jodorowsky's storyboards and a dozen of the biggest Hollywood films (Raiders of the Lost Ark, Star Wars, Matrix) of the last three decades. Is this speculation on your part or have you talked to people who say Jodorowsky's Dune book was floating around in the late '70s and '80s and having an influence in Hollywood and on filmmakers?

FP:

They made 20 copies and only two exist for sure -- Seydoux has one and so does Jodorowsky. That means there are 18 that were out there floating around. Are they still out there floating around? I'm sure it got passed around.

I mean here's George Lucas, who didn't start out making things like Star Wars, he started making things like THX 1138, which is really bizarre, really out there, so I'm sure he was well aware of Jodorowsky's filmography and who he was, and, "Hey, here comes Alejandro over from France with his own big budget science fiction film." I'm sure Lucas would have sought out what it is this guy is doing. Not to take it and to copy from it, I don't think anyone did that, but it became influential. I think it becomes influential from the book. I think it become influential just from the ideas that these other collaborators took with them onto other projects. I know for fact in talking to [Star Wars producer] Gary Kurtz, and he says it was years later, but he says he saw about 50 pages of the Dune book. It was photocopied and stapled together and passed around. It's kind of a beautiful thing and Jodorowsky's thrilled with it, because the ideas were just so powerful that they couldn't not become realized. It had an influence just like a great film would have.

Jodorowsky's Dune is currently screening in New York and Los Angeles, and will expand to theaters across the U.S. in the coming weeks. A full release schedule is available here.
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Re: 'Jodorowsky's Dune'

Postby TheButcher on Sat Nov 29, 2014 3:43 am

Ari Folman Wants To Make Jodorowsky's Dune
Waltz With Bashir director dreams of animated version
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Mon Nov 21, 2016 10:24 pm

Denis Villeneuve on Making ‘Arrival’, ‘Blade Runner’ Sequel His Way Within Studio System
A longstanding dream of mine is to adapt “Dune,” but it’s a long process to get the rights, and I don’t think I will succeed.

Legendary Picks Up Rights to Classic Sci-Fi Novel 'Dune
The projects would be produced by Thomas Tull, Mary Parent and Cale Boyter.
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Re: Dune Reboot

Postby TheButcher on Thu Nov 24, 2016 6:53 am

How 'Dune' Could Give Legendary Its Very Own 'Star Wars'
What if the studio planned something other than direct adaptations of the Frank Herbert sci-fi prose series?
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Re: George Miller's 'Dune'

Postby TheButcher on Thu Nov 24, 2016 11:29 am

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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:16 am

Variety:
‘Blade Runner 2049’ Helmer Denis Villeneuve Eyed to Direct ‘Dune’ Reboot (EXCLUSIVE)
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby so sorry on Thu Dec 22, 2016 1:48 pm

TheButcher wrote:Variety:
‘Blade Runner 2049’ Helmer Denis Villeneuve Eyed to Direct ‘Dune’ Reboot (EXCLUSIVE)



I think every time a story comes out about another possible Dune movie, I'm going to say "I'd rather see a Dune series on HBO".
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Peven on Thu Dec 22, 2016 2:57 pm

how about they just stop trying to unsuccessfully adapt a book that isn't even all that popular, relatively, and move on to other worthy science-fiction properties???? there are all sorts of quality genre books that are sitting there un-mined. I have suggested it before years ago here and will again, The Chanur Saga by C.J. Cherryh or the Gap saga by Stephen R Donaldson would be great opportunities to bring real originality to science fiction cinema and both could be multi-movie franchises. the works of Ray Bradbury, a true master of science fiction, have been largely untouched and not at all by modern filmmakers. I could go on and on, but bottom line is....fuck Dune, lets move on already :-P :D
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby so sorry on Thu Dec 22, 2016 3:29 pm

Peven wrote:how about they just stop trying to unsuccessfully adapt a book that isn't even all that popular, relatively, ...


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Relative to what? Aside from the (standard) sci-fi publishing awards (Hugo and Nebula), and inspiration/ripped off for plenty of other sci-fi properties (uh, hello there Star Wars!)...but other than that, yeah, really not popular at all. :roll:
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Peven on Thu Dec 22, 2016 11:23 pm

relative to how many times it has been adapted for the screen, big and small. there has been a lot of money spent again and again on this property without real success. meanwhile, John Carter, the archetype our modern hero stories are modeled after, created by a prolific and influential genre author, gets one movie that is just ok and the property is declared dead for good. there are other science fiction/fantasy properties that are as successful and critically respected as Dune and haven't gotten one adaptation yet. I would rather see one of them on screen than yet another iteration of sand worms
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 23, 2016 3:48 am

Peven wrote:the Gap saga by Stephen R Donaldson

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The Gap Band?
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Al Shut on Fri Dec 23, 2016 1:24 pm

For what is worth, regarding popularity, I was in a bookstore today and could have picked up a copy of Dune from the shelf. Everything else Peven has talked about not so much. But that might be a vicious cycle of Dune being more known because of the various adaptions.

And the John Carter movie was better than just ok.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby so sorry on Fri Dec 23, 2016 2:37 pm

Al Shut wrote:For what is worth, regarding popularity, I was in a bookstore today and could have picked up a copy of Dune from the shelf. Everything else Peven has talked about not so much. But that might be a vicious cycle of Dune being more known because of the various adaptions.

And the John Carter movie was better than just ok.



Peven logic: Dune was available because it's not popular and the other books are sold out :D
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Peven on Sat Dec 24, 2016 12:53 pm

so sorry wrote:
Al Shut wrote:For what is worth, regarding popularity, I was in a bookstore today and could have picked up a copy of Dune from the shelf. Everything else Peven has talked about not so much. But that might be a vicious cycle of Dune being more known because of the various adaptions.

And the John Carter movie was better than just ok.



Peven logic: Dune was available because it's not popular and the other books are sold out :D


you're just another one of those Dune fans that thinks everyone would love it if they just got it and so no matter how many times they make Dune movies the public doesn't respond to you think it's everyone else's fault instead of the material
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Ribbons on Sat Dec 24, 2016 1:10 pm

I think that any Dune adaptation has a similar problem as the John Carter movie, which is that it's been cannibalized by so many popular films and TV shows at this point that the average person won't understand what the big deal is. And it's not popular enough that you can just say "it's Dune" and expect people to care.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby so sorry on Mon Dec 26, 2016 9:54 am

Peven wrote:
so sorry wrote:
Al Shut wrote:For what is worth, regarding popularity, I was in a bookstore today and could have picked up a copy of Dune from the shelf. Everything else Peven has talked about not so much. But that might be a vicious cycle of Dune being more known because of the various adaptions.

And the John Carter movie was better than just ok.



Peven logic: Dune was available because it's not popular and the other books are sold out :D


you're just another one of those Dune fans that thinks everyone would love it if they just got it and so no matter how many times they make Dune movies the public doesn't respond to you think it's everyone else's fault instead of the material



Nope. I don't even claim to "get Dune" myself. Its a complicated story and requires alot of patience to follow along with if you're reading the series. I read the first book in high school at the height of my fantasy/scifi love, and I know damn well alot of the themes went over my head. I think I tried to reread it in college, and haven't touched it since. But I know enough about it thru reading about it over the decades of my life, think its a cool as hell concept, and I also think that its NOT an impossible book to adapt. Wether or not its got a big enough audience for the general public...? Then again, the same could be said of Game of Thrones, and we know how that turned out.


PS, your response:
Peven wrote:you're just another one of those [NAME THE TOPIC] that thinks everyone would love it if they just got it and so no matter how many times they make[NAME THE TOPIC] the public doesn't respond to you think it's everyone else's fault instead of the material


can pretty much be used against you in most of your more fevered rants, from movies to life to politics.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Ribbons on Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:45 am

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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Peven on Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:50 pm

noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! :-P :lol:
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Fried Gold on Wed Feb 01, 2017 1:24 pm

I liked Sicario, and Arrival was about the best film I've seen in the past year.

So even though I don't have any particular personal interest in Dune, I'd probably go to see this.
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby so sorry on Wed Feb 01, 2017 1:26 pm

Peven wrote:noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! :-P :lol:


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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby Peven on Wed Feb 01, 2017 4:51 pm

that's great filmmaking right there, let me tell you....
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Sat Feb 18, 2017 9:13 am

Harlan Ellison vs David Lynch's Dune
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Re: Denis Villeneuve's Reboot Of David Lynch's Dune

Postby TheButcher on Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:54 am

Collider Exclusive:
Denis Villeneuve on ‘Arrival’, ‘Blade Runner 2049’ and Compares His Vision For ‘Dune’ To David Lynch’s
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:52 am

Villeneuve’s “Dune” Remake Is Ages Away
Denis Villeneuve wrote:“The problem right now, and something I want to change, I worked very fast. I did Prisoners, and then after that, in the past six years I have done five movies — which is not a good idea! It’s too fast. And I learned a lot, I learned so much, for the time now I need just a little time to digest. After Blade Runner, as I’m working on Dune, I would love to just digest and then come back with more energy for Dune with fresh ideas. I need that right now! And so I need distance a little bit.”

Denis Villeneuve wrote:“Dune is a novel that I read when I was a teenager, and I was engulfed. I was [transported] by Dune for years. When I finished Prisoners, when I came to Hollywood I made a movie called Prisoners, and I said to myself, ‘It will be a one shot experience, but I will enjoy it.’ And it went well, and the producers at Alcon [Entertainment] asked me after that, ‘What would you like to do? Is there one thing you’d like to do?’ And I said, ‘Dune.’ Spontaneously. I know there was competition to get the rights, but I always said to myself, and I’m saying it to you, I can’t believe it will be a thing. There’s no screenplay right now, but that will be my dream!”
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Re: The DUNE Movie Thread (no... a new one...)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:31 am

‘Forrest Gump’ Writer Eric Roth to Pen Denis Villeneuve’s ‘Dune’ Reboot (EXCLUSIVE)
Justin Kroll wrote:Legendary has tapped veteran scribe Eric Roth to write the “Dune” reboot.

“Arrival” and “Sicario” filmmaker Denis Villeneuve is directing the movie.

Legendary closed a deal with the Frank Herbert estate last Thanksgiving for his iconic novel, granting the studio rights to not only films, but also TV projects on the sci-fi property.

The projects would be produced by Villeneuve, Mary Parent and Cale Boyter, with Brian Herbert, Byron Merritt, Thomas Tull and Kim Herbert serving as executive producers. Kevin J Anderson will serve as a creative consultant.

Set in the distant future, “Dune” follows Paul Atreides, whose family assumes control of the desert planet Arrakis. As the only producer of a highly valuable resource, jurisdiction over Arrakis is contested among competing noble families. After Paul and his family are betrayed, the story explores themes of politics, religion, and man’s relationship to nature, as Paul leads a rebellion to restore his family’s reign.

The book has sold almost 20 million copies since its original release and in 2003 was named the best-selling sci fi novel of all time.

The novel was also adapted for the 1984 film directed by David Lynch. The movie, which starred Kyle MacLachlan, was initially considered a flop — it was critically panned and grossed just $30.9 million on a $40 million budget — but has recently attained cult status.

Best known for his work on Oscar fare such as “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” “Munich,” and “Forrest Gump,” which earned Roth his only Academy Award, this movie would mark Roth’s first foray into the world of science fiction.

He is repped by CAA and Jackoway Tyerman Wertheimer Austen Mandelbaum Morris & Klein.
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