Marvel TV

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby ONeillSG1 on Tue Jun 26, 2007 1:02 am

ONeillSG1 wrote:
Adam Balm wrote:Punisher: Again, I care not for the character, but this could work under low budget/time-frame conditions. The only real obstacle would be limiting the on-screen violence to make it network tv friendly.


If they could make it like the Equalizer in way of grit and have Frank played by a dark haired David Morse, I'm so there.


Damn, I was much wiser back then.
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Postby buster00 on Tue Jun 26, 2007 1:12 am

That's a pretty solid looking promo pic.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Tue Sep 28, 2010 6:59 am

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Mon Oct 11, 2010 2:40 am

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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 16, 2010 1:00 pm





From Deadline:
ABC Developing 'Incredible Hulk' Series
NELLIE ANDREEVA wrote:The Incredible Hulk is muscling his way to primetime TV. ABC is in very early stages of development of a live-action series adaptation of the popular Marvel comic book character. There is no writer on board yet with search underway. Marvel, which was acquired by ABC parent Disney last year for $4 billion, started a major push in TV in June with the launch of Marvel Television whose goal was to adapt Marvel characters and stories to the small screen. Marvel TV head Jeph Loeb (Smallville) and his team quickly zeroed in on The Hulk, with rumors of a potential Hulk live-action series first surfacing in mid-summer.

For the uninitiated, The Hulk is the giant, green, bulked-up and raging alter ego of quiet physicist Bruce Banner that was the result of Banner’s exposure to radiation in a gamma bomb explosion. Unlike other superheroes, Banner has no control over his alter ego and involuntarily transforms into the Hulk every time he gets angry. The previous Incredible Hulk TV series starring Lou Ferrigno as the Hulk and Bill Bixby as Banner ran on CBS from 1978-82. The character has also spawned a half-dozen TV movies and an animation series. On the big screen, The Hulk has been very busy lately, headlining two live-action/CGI movies, one with Eric Bana and one with Edward Norton in the title role. In the upcoming movie The Avengers, the Hulk/Banner is played by Mark Ruffalo.

The Hulk is the second major comic book character to get a primetime treatment for next season. Warner Bros. TV and DC Comics are developing a Wonder Woman series with The Practice creator David E. Kelley.
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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 16, 2010 1:14 pm

From Heat Vision:
'Hulk' heading back to TV! 'Cloak and Dagger' TV show also being developed
Borys Kit & James Hibberd wrote:Who's ready for another Hulk TV series?

As DC Comics heroine Wonder Woman, who had a TV series during the 1970s, is being prepped for a return to the small screen, Marvel and ABC are contemplating a TV return for the Incredible Hulk. CBS produced a memorable series featuring the jade giant that ran from 1978-82 and starred Bill Bixby and Lou Ferrigno.

At the end of the decade, ABC followed up with three TV movies that featured incarnations of Marvel heroes Daredevil and Thor.

Hulk is one of two projects that are priorities at Marvel Television, Marvel Studio’s TV division, which has been operating under the radar since Jeph Loeb took the reins at the end of June. The second hot property is Cloak and Dagger, which is being developed as a possible show for ABC Family.

Both are in the early stages of development; Hulk has a “showrunner wanted” placard around its neck, and sources are saying that Guillermo del Toro and “Battlestar Galactica” producer David Eick will be pitching a take. ABC had no comment.

Meanwhile, Loeb is meeting with writers to hear ideas for Cloak and Dagger.
Marvel began narrowing it list of possible TV adaptations in May with a presentation on the Disney lot.

Executives presented ABC suits with a list of titles they identified as possible series:
• Heroes for Hire (focusing on ex-con Luke Cage offering to take on bad guys for a price);
• The Eternals (a race of superpowered beings live amid humanity in secret, inspiring legends);
• Agents of Atlas,
* Alter Ego (private investigator Jessica Jones takes on cases involving superhumans);
• Moon Knight,
* the Red Hood (a low-rent criminal discovers a cloak that gives him superpowers);
• Ka-Zar (a Tarzan-type and his saber-toothed tiger must journey to the concrete jungle to seek justice);
• Daughters of the Dragon (a dynamic female duo, one with a bionic arm and the other a granddaughter of a samurai, open a private-detective agency); and
• The Punisher (one man wages a war on crime; already adapted as two feature films).

Ironically, Cloak and Dagger wasn’t on the list. (Hulk was.)

Although the focus appears to be on Hulk and Cloak and Dagger, Punisher also has been selected from the herd and is eyed as a cable play, but that is even further away. Marvel’s TV division wants to take things slow, according to insiders, focusing on one or two shows, making sure they are the best they can be and establishing a quality brand before moving forward.

Marvel is in the middle of establishing a shared universe with its movies (the pics and the characters form one big story), but it’s unknown whether the studio will undertake a similar path with TV. Also unknown is whether there would be a connection between the film world and TV world.



From The Live Feed:
Hulk smash ABC! ‘Incredible’ revival returns to TV
Borys Kit & James Hibberd wrote:Who’s ready for another Hulk TV series?

Marvel and ABC are developing a TV return for comic icon the Incredible Hulk. CBS last produced a memorable series featuring the jade giant that ran from 1978-82 and starred Bill Bixby and Lou Ferrigno.

The news comes as DC Comics heroine Wonder Woman, who had a TV series during the 1970s, is also being prepped for a return to the small screen.

Hulk is one of two projects that are priorities at Marvel Television, Marvel Studio’s TV division, which has been operating under the radar since Jeph Loeb took the reins at the end of June.

The second hot property is "Cloak and Dagger," which is being developed for ABC Family.

Both are in the early stages of development; Hulk has a “showrunner wanted” placard around its neck. ABC had no comment. Meanwhile, Loeb is meeting with writers to hear ideas for "Cloak and Dagger."

Marvel began narrowing it list of possible TV adaptations in May with a presentation on the Disney lot. Executives presented ABC suits with a list of titles they identified as possible series:

• "Heroes for Hire" (focusing on ex-con Luke Cage offering to take on bad guys for a price);

• "The Eternals" (a race of superpowered beings live amid humanity in secret, inspiring legends);

• "Agents of Atlas, Alter Ego" (private investigator Jessica Jones takes on cases involving superhumans);

• "Moon Knight, the Red Hood" (a low-rent criminal discovers a cloak that gives him superpowers);

• "Ka-Zar" (a Tarzan-type and his saber-toothed tiger must journey to the concrete jungle to seek justice);

• "Daughters of the Dragon" (a dynamic female duo, one with a bionic arm and the other a granddaughter of a samurai, open a private-detective agency); and

• "The Punisher" (one man wages a war on crime; already adapted as two feature films).

Ironically, "Cloak and Dagger" wasn’t on the list. (Hulk was.)

Although the focus appears to be on "Hulk" and "Cloak and Dagger," "Punisher" also has been selected from the herd and is eyed as a cable play, but that is even further away. Marvel’s TV division wants to take things slow, according to insiders, focusing on one or two shows, making sure they are the best they can be and establishing a quality brand before moving forward.

Marvel is in the middle of establishing a shared universe with its movies (the pics and the characters form one big story), but it’s unknown whether the studio will undertake a similar path with TV. Also unknown is whether there would be a connection between the film world and TV world.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 16, 2010 3:03 pm

Marvel Movies Vs. Marvel TV: Joe Quesada Explains The Decision-Making Process
Josh Wigler wrote:"If you can think of any viable Marvel property that you think might be good for a motion picture or television or animation, it has been discussed," Quesada told MTV News during New York Comic Con. "Those ideas have been put on a sort of priority list of things that we feel corporately are the best ones to attack first."

"The one thing we don't want to do is attack everything at one time," he continued. "Then you can't really maintain the quality of taking it from infancy and incubation to the final product. You want to be very, very careful, especially in the world of TV."

"In movies, we've been very, very careful about how we're releasing our movies," he continued. "We're not coming out there with five motion pictures in the same year. The constraints that it puts on the company, the fact that 'Thor' and 'Captain America' are coming out in the same year, it's a huge drain because we're a very small company."

Quesada thinks that even if the company occasionally goes at a slower pace than some fans are craving, the Marvel Studios approach is the right one.

"I do think we're taking the right approach for this," he said. "We are hearing the fans out there and strategically, we have to think about these properties not just domestically, but worldwide. We're part of the Disney family right now, we're an international company — Marvel's gone worldwide!"
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 16, 2010 3:05 pm

NYCC: Jeph Loeb Responds To Marvel TV Poll, Says 'Heroes For Hire' Is 'In The Spirit' Of Planned Projects
"There are some pretty big surprises, however, [and] when we do finally announce what it is that we'll be doing, I think people will be going, 'Wow, you're really going to get out there and make something that will be huge and enormous and wonderful,'" he said.
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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 16, 2010 9:19 pm

Greenlight for Incredible Hulk? ABC mulling TV series for Marvel super hero

Ethan Sacks wrote:Talk about a potential smash hit.

ABC and Marvel Entertainment are in the early stages of developing a potential live-action "Incredible Hulk" television series for next season, Deadline.com reported. ABC and Marvel are both owned by the same parent company, Disney.

The character enjoyed a successful run from 1978-1982 on CBS, with bodybuilder Lou Ferrigno in green body paint as the walking anger-management issue. The late Bill Bixby played the monster's mild-mannered alter-ego, Dr. David Banner (Bruce Banner in the comics). Ferrigno is still a fan favorite and fixture on the comic book convention circuit all these years later.

"Actually, I think the potential for a successful Hulk TV show is greater now than ever," says Stan Lee, who created the character for Marvel with Jack Kirby in 1962. "For one thing, think of the sensational special effects available to us now, plus the fact that ol' green skin is known and loved world-wide. Factor in a cameo by me and how can it miss?"

But even with cutting-edge special effects, the character has had mixed success on the big screen. Actor Mark Ruffalo, with a healthy dollop of CGI, plays the Hulk in 2012’s "The Avengers" movie after replacing Ed Norton, who in turn replaced Eric Bana, in successive movies.

The Hulk is just the latest superhero patrolling the small screen. Warner Bros. reportedly is developing a "Wonder Woman" TV show with David E. Kelley.

"There are so many superhero shows on now," says Hercules, the TV editor for Ain't It Cool News. "Never mind they've got [NBC's] 'The Cape' coming, they've got two superhero shows in development at the SyFy Channel. The Cartoon Network has 'Tower Prep.' You've got 'Smallville' on the CW Network, and 'No Ordinary Family' on ABC.

"There's just a huge onslaught of this kind of project."

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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 16, 2010 9:22 pm

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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Sun Oct 17, 2010 11:28 pm

From Comic Book Movie:
Marvel always intended The Incredible Hulk to become a tv show?
Like several people here and on other sites the news of The Incredible Hulk returning to our screens left us with mixed feelings. Recapturing the success of the original series and giving us more time with Bruce Banner and his green alter ego is great but at the cost of TV show budget CGI and being disconnected from the live-action Marvel Cinematic Universe left people uneasy.

At these thoughts, I found myself becoming very negative toward this idea of a Hulk TV show. However, after reading a few comments from other CBMers (including but not exclusive to "SkylerMystwood") and rereading information given to us by Marvel Studio's president of production, Kevin Feige, and others, I found myself considering whether this wasn't always just part of the plan.

During the development of 2008's The Incredible Hulk, Marvel refereed to Ang Lee's film was like a parallel universe one-shot comic book, and their next film needed to be, in Kevin Feige's words, "really starting the Marvel Hulk franchise". We all just assumed this meant film franchises, or more specifically Avengers film franchise, but what if it was more than that. He later stated that the film met Marvel's expectations and that Hulk will return, but after the crossover.

Tim Roth, who played Emil Blonsky/The Abomination, confirmed that Marvel has made overtures to him about reprising the role in the future, during a group interview at the Television Critics Association summer press tour.

"They have, but in a very different way, I don't want to get into it, but they signed me up for three." what the interviewer took to mean films and when asked what that could include Roth said in response "It could be anything".

Another contributing factor may be in the design of 2008's The Incredible Hulk.

The fact they based the origin around the original TV show, was it just because they believed the general audience knew this origin better, was it because the director and stars were fans of the original or was it more than that, was it because they envisioned this movie to be the first chapter in something alot bigger.

On the subject of The Incredible Hulk's opening credits, it did also leave a large unexplored area where Bruce Banner is on the run from General Ross while trying to find a cure, which has proved to be perfect for television.

Though if it is to feature Tim Roth it would have to be set either between 2008's film and The Avengers or after the team film. Though afterward you'd think Hulk would be too busy with The Avengers unless he doesn't join them.

As for cost, if all the Hulk character designs and animations exist and marvel owns them can it use the pre-existing effects already set up? if so then that would surely lower the cost of the TV show.

And another question would have to be asked of actor Mark Ruffalo, who is set to take the role of Bruce Banner in The Avengers, is he willing to do a TV show or will they get another new Banner. That i cant answer.

Maybe im just looking to much into this but maybe, just maybe there is in fact something in this.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby SilentBobX on Tue Oct 19, 2010 10:21 am

It's the 70s all over again. Wonder Woman and the Hulk coming back to TV, the Bionic Woman........wait nevermind, at least the orig.'s finally coming to dvd.

I do hope they scale down the Hulk a bit, keep him large but not to the point where they'd need a huge CGI budget. Punisher as a show on premium cable would definitely work, keep it R rated, plenty of real violence, maybe do a voiceover ala Burn Notice, as in the comics, Punisher War Journal, it was part of it. Cloak and Dagger I'm not too familiar with, despite having several issues. To me, keeping medium and non-powered Marvel heroes on the small screen works.

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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Fri Oct 22, 2010 1:10 am

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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:33 am

From IGN:
Lost, Battlestar Alums Among Potential Hulk TV Series Writers?
Eric Goldman wrote:Is the Hulk really set to return to TV? It was recently reported that Marvel and ABC were working together to develop a new TV series about the comic book character. Now, EW.com is saying that, "Insiders caution to EW that any speculation about the return of the big green man is premature, though interest from ABC is apparently there."

EW goes on to say that there is still no script for a new Hulk series and certainly no casting as yet, however they add that Marvel TV head Jeph Loeb is searching for a writer to tackle the project. An intriguing part of the story is that EW notes rumors that Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof is among the writers on Loeb's wish list, which would obviously be a pairing of project and writer that would get a lot of fanboys talking – though Hollywood Reporter said Battlestar Galactica's David Eick was also potentially going to pitch a take.
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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:35 am

From EW:
Will Marvel return 'The Hulk' to TV?
Lynette Rice wrote:He aired on TV from 1978-82 and is about to return to the big screen for yet a third time, but there are plenty of people in Hollywood who think The Hulk can still stage a comeback to the small screen. To wit: Some reports suggested that the newly-launched TV arm of Disney-owned Marvel is high on developing the franchise for another run in prime time. Insiders caution to EW that any speculation about the return of the big green man is premature, though interest from ABC is apparently there. But for right now, there is no script and certainly no modern-day Bill Bixby to assume the high-profile role.

EW has been told that Marvel TV head Jeph Loeb (you’ll know him as the comic book writer who, together with Jesse Alexander, brought us the best years of Heroes) is on the lookout for a genre scribe who can reboot the franchise for today’s TV audiences. Rumor has it that Damon Lindelof (Lost) is among the writers on his wish list, though the Hollywood Reporter said Battlestar Galactica producer David Eick was also looking to pitch a take.

Even if we don’t see a new version of a Hulk TV series by next season – if at all – the promise of Marvel looking to expand its sphere of influence into TV is an exciting development, especially given all the titles (obscure or otherwise) that the company has at its disposal. Says Comic-Con marketing head David Glanzer, “I am excited at the prospect of comics getting more exposure on television. However, for me, storylines are critical. As a fan I want substance more than flash.”
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:28 am

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Re: SPIDER-MAN 1978!!

Postby TheButcher on Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:35 am

Spider-Man 1978 - The Deadly Dust:
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Tue Nov 30, 2010 6:57 am

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 17, 2010 4:05 pm

From Variety:
'Twilight' screenwriter sets Marvel adaptation for TV - Rosenberg plans 'AKA Jessica Jones' at ABC
Michael Schneider wrote:"Twilight" screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg plans to adapt an edgy female Marvel character for her next TV project.

Rosenberg is the writer and exec producer on "AKA Jessica Jones," which is in development for fall 2011 at ABC. Although ABC is also in the early stages of an "Incredible Hulk" redux, the deal for "AKA Jessica Jones" is close enough (though not yet fully signed) that it will likely be Marvel Television's first official project for the Alphabet net.

"AKA Jessica Jones" will also mark the launch of Rosenberg's Tall Girls Prods. banner. The scribe, who's a former exec producer on "Dexter," is starting Tall Girls in order to create and produce projects featuring large, complex female roles.

"AKA Jessica Jones" definitely fits that bill. Part of Marvel's Max line of more mature comicbook titles, the character is a superhero ("Jewel") who winds up with post-traumatic stress disorder and gets out of that biz.

Jessica, now in her early 30s, decides to keep far away from others gifted with superpowers and to open her own detective agency. But once she settles down, she realizes she still has a drive to help people -- and finds herself assisting other superheroes.

Insiders said Rosenberg was drawn to Jessica Jones because the character is unlike most female leading roles on network TV: deeply flawed but with a biting sense of humor.

Besides Rosenberg, exec producers on "AKA Jessica Jones" include Marvel TV topper Jeph Loeb, Marvel Entertainment chief creative officer Joe Quesada and Marvel Worldwide's Alan Fine; 3 Arts Entertainment's Howard Klein ("Parks and Recreation") is also an exec producer.

Brian Michael Bendis, who created the character and the comicbook series on which the series is based (along with Michael Gaydos), is a consultant. Bendis and Gaydos' comicbook series, which launched in November 2001, was titled "Alias" -- but ABC obviously can't use that title, given the completely unrelated Jennifer Garner series of that name.

ABC Studios is behind the show, along with Marvel TV. ABC, ABC Studios and Marvel all declined comment on "AKA Jessica Jones."

ABC has been looking at ways to mine the Marvel library now that the two are Disney siblings. At the same time, under Loeb (who joined the company over the summer), Marvel is aggressively getting into the series business.

Guillermo del Toro and David Eick continue their talks to adapt "Hulk" at ABC. And ABC Family is kicking around an adaptation of "Cloak and Dagger."

Marvel TV's 2-year-old animation division has also been busy as of late. Company is already behind Cartoon Network's "Super Hero Squad" and just debuted "Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes" for boy-centric cabler Disney XD, where Marvel's next big project, "Ultimate Spider-Man," will land. Disney Channel execs recently said they hope to create a Marvel-branded programming block on Disney go by 2012.

The networks, meanwhile, have been eager to develop a femme-centric superhero franchise -- the kind of show that could attract both fanboys and women. The CW is looking to turn DC's "Raven" into an hourlong, while David E. Kelley continues to kick around a rework of "Wonder Woman." Rosenberg wrote the screenplays to "Twilight," "Twilight Saga: New Moon," "Twilight Saga: Eclipse" and the two upcoming "Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn" movies. In TV, Rosenberg was an exec producer on "Dexter," and also worked on series such as "Love Monkey," "The OC," "Ally McBeal" and "Party of Five."
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jan 13, 2011 10:45 pm

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Re: Marvel TV: THOR

Postby TheButcher on Tue May 03, 2011 2:56 am

From IGN: Thor's TV History
From fighting the Hulk in live-action to meeting up with Spider-Man's amazing friends, we look back at the God of Thunder on the small screen.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jul 23, 2011 4:10 pm

CCI: Marvel Television Panel
Shaun Manning wrote:At Comic-Con International in San Diego, Marvel Head of Television Jeph Loeb hosted a panel on Marvel's current and upcoming features, with new footage from "Ultimate Spider-Man" on display and the world premiere of "Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes" season 2, episode 1. Loeb announced live-action shows in development including "aka Jessica Jones," "Hulk," "Cloak and Dagger," and "Mockingbird," as well as an animated "Hulk: Agents of SMASH" headed up by Paul Dini and the complete run of "Astonishing X-Men" done in Marvel Knights Animation style.

"Marvel TV was a brand new idea a year ago," Loeb began, recounting how he was asked to move from publishing into creating television projects that have "Marvel DNA in them."

"Really, at the end of the day, the peanut butter side of my head and the chocolate side of my head get to play together, making TV shows based on comics," he said.

He then introduced the topic of Marvel Live Action. Loeb provided the caveat that any projects shown are "in development," and may or may not make it to the screen.

The first show concept is "aka Jessica Jones" at ABC, based on Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos' "Alias," which Loeb described as a story about "a failed superhero." "We obviously can't call it 'Alias,' thank you JJ Abrams." Loeb said the show would feature Carol Danvers and Luke Cage.

"Hulk" was the next project announced, "a brand new take on the character" set in his early years, "before everyone knew his secret," and focused on the love story between Banner and Betty Ross.

"Cloak and Dagger" for ABC Family was announced next, a story about "two teenagers who discover each other and find their powers both complement and complicate their lives." The series will be set in post-Katrina New Orleans, prompting a fan near the front to gasp, "Holy Shit!" "You can come to every panel," Loeb said.

"Mockingbird" is also in development for ABC Family, depicting Bobby Morse as "a Peter Parker Nerd" who is recruited to a secret organization.

Loeb then moved on to animation, thanking fans for their support of "Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes" and "Super Hero Squad." He then introduced "Ultimate Spider-Man," which will premiere next year on Disney XD. He showed sketches of Spider-Man and Spider-Ham. Fans cheered when Loeb mentioned that Paul Dini will be writing for the show. He also said "Ben10" creators Man of Action Studios will also contribute, the studio of Joe Casey, Steven T. Seagle, Duncan Rouleau, and others. Bendis will serve as Creative Consultant.

Loeb then played a sizzle for "USM," with behind-the-scenes footage featuring some of the show's talent. Stan Lee came up first, grinning "Spider-Man!" The first bit of animation was a split screen of MJ splitting carrots while Spidey fights off bad guys, talking on the phone. Following some action, Peter is shown sewing his costume, looking to the camera and saying, "What?" Spidey fights Venom, and there were several comic-esque visual effects

Drake Bell spoke about playing Spider-Man, "It's great playing a super-hero who's so iconic."

Stan Lee plays Stan the Janitor and will have a recurring role.

Nick Fury is played by Chi McBride and will mentor him into the "Ultimate Spider-Man."

Clark Gregg as Agent Coulson. Coulson will also be the principle.

JK SImmons = JJJ, as he is on film, and Stephen Webber is Norman Osborn, "a powerful industrial who a grudge with Spider-Man."

As the footage ended, Loeb said "everyone who was involved in the casting process chose one person." Drake Bell then joined Loeb on stage. Bell said he was seeing the sizzle reel for the first time and was overjoyed to see his voice with the character. Loeb then premiered the trailer for the show, as well.

J. Jonah Jameson began with a voice over condemning Spidey, as the web-slinger himself fights Elektro, then Venom, followed by Doctor Doom. He also teams up with Avengers and is chased through the NYC subway by an octopus-like robot.

"Our hope is that it looks different from any Spider-Man show you've seen before," Loeb said once the trailer concluded.

"Being a fan of the comics and something we've never had in animation before is Spider-Ham," Bell said, adding that the snorts were a lot of fun.

Artists contributing the look of the show included Stuart Immonen, Humberto Ramos, and Joe Quesada, who provided drawings of the characters to the animation team. Loeb acknowledged the late Spider-Ham creator Mike Wieringo.

Loeb then moved on to Marvel Knights Animation, which recently produced "Thor & Loki: Blood Brothers." The complete run Joss Whedon and John Cassaday's "Astonishing X-Men" will be translated to animation, with Cassaday as a consultant on the animation.

Paul Dini then joined Loeb on stage. Asked whether there's anything he'd like to work on, Dini said, "I've always loved the Hulk." A slide showed "Hulk: Agents of SMASH," with multi-colored Hulks, as Loeb and Dini bantered about how he'd "come up with this idea just right now." The series is in development for Disney XD.

Moving on to "Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes," Loeb invited writer Chris Yost to the stage, though he admitted he was unsure if Yost was in the room. Yost, however, is apparently not in attendance. Loeb then played the first episode of Season 2.

The episode began with a mysterious figure assessing the threat levels of each Avenger, with Hulk garnering an "extreme" rating. The villain is revealed as Doctor Doom.

Johnny Storm and The Thing show up at Avengers mansion to play poker, but when Hulk sees them, he growls "Grimm!" and tackles him out the door.

Janet Van Dyne hangs out with Sue Storm, while Tony Stark chats with Reed Richards. The differences between the pairs are a lot of fun.

Doom's simultaneous attacks on the Avengers and FF HQs take the heroes from zero to 60 in about three seconds.

The action continues relentlessly, with some very fun moments of humor, but the recap will now conclude to avoid ruining surprises.
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Re: THE INCREDIBLE HULK

Postby TheButcher on Thu Sep 29, 2011 2:09 am

From twitch:
Random Geek Talk - Marvel In The 1970's: THE INCREDIBLE HULK
Todd Brown wrote:
[Over the next several weeks, Comics Bulletin will be teaming up with Twitch to explore the world of Marvel Comics film adaptations in a series of essays from some of our best writers. We'll begin with Marvel's early efforts in the '70s, '80s and '90s before moving on to the more modern era of adaptations that Blade heralded. These essays will cover the ground of some of Marvel's most obscure adaptations and shine a light on how far comic adaptations as a whole have come in that time, as well as showcasing some of the value that can still be found in these early explorations. This installment by Paul Brian McCoy.]

Seven months after CBS debuted The Amazing Spider-Man, on November 4, 1977, Marvel's second feature-length live action film also debuted on CBS: The Incredible Hulk. It seemed as though a lesson was learned. Everything that made The Amazing Spider-Man a trial to get through is deftly avoided by writer/director Kenneth Johnson.

Johnson had previously done television sci-fi, working on The Six Million Dollar Man and introducing the character of Jamie Sommers before spinning her off into her own series, The Bionic Woman. After crafting the Hulk, he was then responsible for creating the original V mini-series as well as producing Alien Nation. He also wrote some and directed all of the Alien Nation TV movies that aired throughout the Nineties.

My point being that with The Incredible Hulk, the producers went after and got someone who was experienced in the genre, gave him both writing and directing responsibilities, and were rewarded with the most mature and creatively satisfying Marvel live-action production we'd get for well over a decade.

And casting Bill Bixby as David Banner (legend has it 'Bruce' was deemed too Dumbledore a name for the character, although Johnson claims it was to honor his late son) was the masterstroke. Television success is all about befriending the audience. If the viewers feel comfortable with an actor, they will put up with most anything when it comes to story. And Bill Bixby had built up a lot of audience goodwill over the years, mainly due to sixties classics, My Favorite Martian and The Courtship of Eddie's Father.

Although out of the public eye for half a decade, Bixby had just struck paydirt with a role in the 1976 miniseries Rich Man, Poor Man and was intrigued with the approach Johnson took with The Hulk.

You see, unlike The Amazing Spider-Man, where the origin was slipped in almost by accident to a pedestrian, sci-fi tinged crime plot, The Incredible Hulk spent the first chunk of its ninety minute runtime dealing with Banner as a character, establishing his obsessions and building up the tragedy of his dead wife-- not to mention, the guilt he felt about not being able to save her-- before introducing the origin and the monster. The results and repercussions of his transformation are the focus of the rest of the film with no distractions.

Two weeks later, another pilot aired, The Incredible Hulk: A Death in the Family, and it was this adventure that would establish the narrative format for the ongoing series. After the set-up the character was given in the first pilot, "Death in the Family" gets right to telling its story without side-tracking itself with unnecessary exposition.

This time out, Johnson wrote the script, but Alan J. Levi directed. The two men had worked together on The Bionic Woman, and Levi would go on to direct episodes of the original Battlestar Galactica, Airwolf, Quantum Leap, Lois & Clark, and eventually, one episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In short, not only was he a solid working director who shared a history with the main creative mind behind the show, he would go on to work in the sci-fi/action genre well into 2004.

So it should come as no surprise that "A Death in the Family" works very well as a launching point for a series that would last five full seasons under Johnson's hand. The majority of episodes stuck to a formula-- Banner shows up under an assumed name (he faked his death and had been on the run since the end of the pilot), meets someone in trouble, Hulks out a couple times while helping them get out of trouble, then moves on-- that was basically The Fugitive with green body paint and a Beatles wig.

And while the story of "A Death in the Family" is fairly one-note, we do get to see the Hulk fight a grizzly bear. In a river. While an old drunk guy watches. And we only barely care that thrashing about in the water is washing the green off of body-builder Lou Ferrigno.

The Incredible Hulk shared the CBS airwaves with DC's Wonder Woman, which had launched the year before, and then, based on the success of the television movie, The Amazing Spider-Man, which started its run as a weekly show on April 5, 1978. Although calling it a full-fledged series is a bit of a stretch as only five episodes would air that first season.

Paul Brian McCoy's series will continue next week with a look at the 1970's versions of Doctor Strange and Captain America.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Thu Oct 20, 2011 9:18 pm

Fox Buys ‘The Punisher’ Series Adaptation From Ed Bernero & Marvel With Put Pilot
NELLIE ANDREEVA wrote:In one of the last big drama deals this buying season, Fox has handed a put pilot commitment to The Punisher, a series based on the Marvel comic from Ed Bernero and ABC Studios. This is one of two high-profile sales for former Criminal Minds showrunner Ed Bernero. He also has high-concept Western spec The Eye set up at ABC.

The Punisher is described as an hour-long procedural with a Marvel signature and a new take on one of the comic book giant’s iconic characters, Frank Castle, a rising star detective with the New York Police Department who moonlights as the vigilante Punisher, seeking justice for those the system has failed. Bernero will executive produce along with Marvel. This marks the first sale this season and the first one ever outside of ABC for Disney-owned Marvel, which is developing TV series based on its properties through ABC Studios. Last season, the company set up Hulk with Guillermo del Toro and David Eick and AKA Jessica Jones with Melissa Rosenberg at ABC. Those projects have been moving on a slower development track at the network. This marks ABC-affiliated ABC Studios’ second high-profile sale to Fox this season, following another put pilot commitment for the Shonda Rimes-produced 1980s dramedy Wildwood. It also is part of Fox’s return to the comic book adaptation business after the recent cancellation of Human Target. In addition to The Punisher, Fox has in the works The Spectre, a drama based on the DC Comics superhero character co-created by Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel and Bernard Baily.

As for Bernero’s other project, The Eye at ABC, it is a Western with a paranormal twist set in 1871 Arizona and centered on a team of Pinkerton Detectives who search for answers to unexplained phenomena. After a long tenure as showrunner of Criminal Minds and its spinoff, UTA-repped Bernero has recently focused on development through his ABC Studios-based Bernero Prods run by Rob Kim. Last year, he created and executive produced the ABC/ABC Studios drama pilot Partners.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby King Psyz on Fri Oct 21, 2011 8:41 pm

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:48 pm

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:48 pm

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 24, 2012 1:07 am

From TIME:
Are Superheroes Too Big For Television? The Avengers, Batman and Spider-man are headlining this season's must-see movies. Then why is it so hard for superheroes to fly on the small screen?
Graeme McMillan wrote:Despite what seemed like overwhelmingly good news for Marvel Enterprises lately — including the record-breaking success of The Avengers as it remained the best-selling movie three weekends in a row and Avengers vs. X-Men topping the comic book charts — the skies above the self-styled House of Ideas aren’t entirely clear of clouds: While everyone in the movie industry is wishing that they had their own Marvel superhero project, both ABC and Fox have passed on pilots from the company’s television division. Coincidental madness, or a sign that the networks have realized that live-action superheroes don’t seem to work on the small screen?

Consider, for example, the sad fates of other recent superhero series such as ABC’s 2010 No Ordinary Family (one season, 20 episodes) or NBC’s 2010 The Cape (one season, 10 episodes), not to mention the unsuccessful 2007 Aquaman pilot Mercy Reef or the similarly unreleased 2011 Wonder Woman pilot. While it’s true that not every show disappears as quickly — look at the CW’s Superman-in-training series Smallville, which made it 10 seasons — long-term successes in the genre are outliers compared with short runs or medium-length burn-outs like NBC’s Heroes.

The classic 1970s Incredible Hulk made it to five seasons and 1950s Adventures of Superman an impressive six, but those may be Smallville-esque anomalies. Like Heroes, the 1990s Lois & Clark and 1980s Superboy went from surprise success to cancellation in four years, while the 1960s Batman, 1970s Wonder Woman and Shazam, 1980s Greatest American Hero and 2000s Mutant X all hit it and quit it after three seasons. Suddenly, you can understand why ABC said no to AKA Jessica Jones in spite of the familial connection (both ABC and Marvel are owned by the Walt Disney Corporation) and Fox didn’t move forward bringing the Punisher to weekly television. These shows apparently aren’t built to last. But why?

The problem may be that the audience has become too familiar with the blockbuster superhero movies that have appeared with increasing regularity since Bryan Singer’s X-Men back in 2000: we’ve come to believe that superhero stories are just too big for television. Think about it: in movies like the Spider-Man trilogy, the Avengers movies, Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight series or Green Lantern, the stakes are always so much higher than simply foiling a bank robbery or socking the latest bad guy in the jaw; now, every single adventure has to involve saving the city, the world or all of existence, it seems, in order to match what we’ve already seen. That’s great for a movie, but for the continuing narrative of serial television? Maybe not so much.

Compare the aftermath of Avengers with what followed the saved cheerleader, saved world of the first season of Heroes. What happens after you save the world? Either you have a comedy bit about shwarma, or you have to suddenly come up with a “Volume Two” that (a) doesn’t feel like a retread of where you’ve just been and (b) isn’t a letdown for the audience, which is fairly difficult considering the last thing you did was save the world. One of those is easy, and one is very, very difficult. (Yes, I know that there will be an Avengers 2 as well as new installments in the Iron Man, Captain America and Thor, but there will be time for both the audience to get over the first saving of the world and for the creators to determine how to follow that trick up.) Superhero television may not necessarily breed contempt, but exhaustion — both for the viewers and those responsible for creating the show itself.

Perhaps a more immediate concern to the networks, however (since creative exhaustion means nothing when showrunners are so easily replaceable, as Dan Harmon has sadly demonstrated this weekend) is the fact that it is barely conceivable for a television show to be able to match the special effects seen in superhero movies on a weekly basis in terms of both cost and man-hours. For better or worse, superhero movies are the baseline for what an audience expects visually from a superhero story these days. Anything less than, say, Green Lantern-level effects and audiences will complain about things looking hokey and unbelievable, and credibility is lost. In short, the idea of how much work it will take — and how much money said work will cost — to make effects that look “good enough” in an age where seven or eight different digital effects houses worked on Avengers was likely enough to turn off ABC and Fox, especially considering the relative failure of the ambitious and expensive Terra Nova last season.

“Superhero movies, at their best, are a juxtaposition of character, drama, comedy and action,” explains Drew Pierce, a screenwriter whose credits include both British superhero television series No Heroics and next year’s Iron Man 3. “But audiences really like that action bit — whether it’s Avengers or Dark Knight or Iron Man 3. It’s clearly an essential component of the cocktail, because when that part’s not up to snuff, a lot less people go to see your movie. But big action set-pieces are thus far way too pricey for weekly episodic TV — and even when shows try to achieve the scale, they can’t compete with the movies coming out that weekend.”

So does that mean that live-action superhero television is entirely dead or doomed to future failure? “Absolutely not. You just have to approach them — and, crucially, their duties — differently to their movie cousins,” Pierce says. ”You have to be aware that you can’t compete with the structures and strictures of the superhero stories you’ve seen on the big screen. Essentially you have to insert the world of superheroes into a different genre from the ‘superhero movie’ itself. A TV genre, ideally.”

Pierce cites Brian Michael Bendis’ Powers as the perfect example of this type of form. In development with FX since 2009, this series features police officers operating in a world filled with superheroes, villains and super crime. “At heart it can be a crime procedural — the most enduring, salable, franchisable TV genre in the world. If and when they figure it out [as a television show], that genre crossover is world-beating. Forget zombies, forget vampires. I you nail superheroes in a forensic procedural? You’re golden,” Pierce says.


But even if Powers remains stalled at FX, there’s still hope for homo superior and their crime-fighting colleagues. After all, ever since Batman, the Guardian and Mr. Terrific debuted in the four-color comic books of the 1940s, there has been a superhero alternative to the big-screen-friendly shock and awe of the hyper-powered hero — and we’ve had the model for the perfect television series featuring that kind of character in our hands for more than a decade, thanks to the very same man currently dazzling audiences with Iron Man, Hulk and Black Widow.

Buffy Summers, Vampire Slayer is the ultimate television superhero. There are roughly several thousand nerds who will argue with me on that point, but really: She fights evil no one else can, she has abilities beyond normal people and she has to keep her activities secret from most of her friends and family. Buffy The Vampire Slayer was most definitely a superhero series in form and inspiration; echoing the tone and construction of early Marvel Comics, the series played physical, fantastic conflict off emotional, “mundane” (that is, realistic) drama, ensuring that neither one was ever clearly dominant. (Buffy may have, as the series said, “saved the world… a lot,” but it’s hard to feel that anything was more difficult than dealing with the death of her mother.)

Take that combination of never-ending, constantly overlapping personal struggles and fistfights and add a shadowy figure behind the scenes, pulling strings and escalating events before being discovered, confronted and (usually) defeated, and what do you have? Not only every season of Buffy, but also every extended story arc from the golden age of The Amazing Spider-Man comic. This storytelling model is an easily adaptable way forward for television superheroes, and one that’s already been proven to succeed. Smallville, after all, was essentially Buffy Superboy in its construction. (Smartly, it’s also a show that kept the big pyrotechnics at bay until the series finale, avoiding the “And then what?” problem.) No wonder that the CW’s replacement show Arrow seems to follow a similar path with an even more low-powered hero: Green Arrow, who has no powers, but is really good with a bow and arrow. Syfy’s Alphas, which debuted last year, has similarly found success in limiting its storytelling scope, if not its ambition.

We’ve been living in a post-Buffy era for some time — literally since 2003, but figuratively since the show debuted in 1997 — and we’ve been dealing with a new breed of superheroes (Angel, Supernatural, Grimm) ever since. It’s possible that the televisual prevalence of such characters primed us for their big-screen dominance without anyone noticing. If networks want to take advantage of the audience’s taste for superheroes, there’s really only one way to go: Make the genre bigger by going smaller.
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Re: S.H.I.E.L.D.

Postby TheButcher on Mon Feb 25, 2013 3:09 am

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Mon Aug 05, 2013 7:38 am

ABC Entertainment Chief Wants More Marvel, 'Grey's Anatomy'
Marisa Guthrie wrote:More Marvel on tap?

Lee is keen to exploit Disney's partnerships with Marvel and Star Wars creator George Lucas' Lucasfilm; Disney acquired Marvel and Lucasfilm last year for $4 billion each. Agents of SHIELD will be the first Marvel property to get the primetime series treatment at ABC. "We are loving this relationship [with Marvel]," gushed Lee. "The relationship with Marvel and with other Disney [intellectual property] across the company is something we are ambitious to build. We have lots of little schemes in mind." But Lee was mum on details. And he added that development with Lucasfilm may take more time considering the company's full plate, with a new Star Wars trilogy, the first of which is due in 2015. "We have started conversations with them," said Lee. "I'd love to go there. I'm a particular fan of Lucasfilm. It's an amazing world."
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:26 am

Marvel Readying 'Agent Carter' Series
The project is inspired by a one-shot highlighted on the "Iron Man 3" Blu-ray featuring "Captain America's" Hayley Atwell.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Thu Sep 19, 2013 1:49 pm

Marvel Developing ‘Agent Carter’ TV Series
NELLIE ANDREEVA wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
The “one shot” short films featured as extras on Marvel movies’ DVD releases are becoming a hotbed for TV series ideas. After one such short, Item 47 on The Avengers DVD about the agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., led to the new ABC/Marvel series, another one may also spawn a series project for ABC. Marvel is notoriously secretive about their development, and no one would comment, but I hear the company is working on a concept for a potential TV series inspired by Agent Carter, a one shot, which will be featured on the upcoming Blu-ray release of Iron Man 3. Directed by Marvel Studios co-president Louis D’Esposito, Agent Carter brings back Captain America’s girlfriend Peggy Carter, Marvel Agent Carter TV Seriesplayed by Hayley Atwell, and chronicles her life as a budding secret agent after her boyfriend is stranded in ice. (Watch a clip below.) I hear the project is in very early stages, one of several in the works at Marvel, and is in the process of locking in a writer. It is unclear if Atwell would reprise her role if Agent Carter comes to fruition. A Marvel action series with a female lead would fit right into ABC’s wheelhouse of female-skewing dramas with a strong lead and would be a throwback to such network series as Alias. The Iron Man 3 DVD with the Agent Carter short will be released next Tuesday, the same day Marvel’s first series for ABC, Marvel’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D., debuts.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:04 am

Marvel Preps 60-Episode Package Of Four Series & A Mini For VOD & Cable Networks
NELLIE ANDREEVA wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
The notorious secrecy that surrounds Marvel‘s projects has been heightened to the nth degree for this one. No one would breathe a word, with rumors that everyone from top to bottom is bound by strict nondisclosure agreements, but I hear that Marvel is quietly putting together a package of four drama series and a miniseries — a total of some 60 episodes — that would be taken out to the VOD and cable space, with Netflix, Amazon and WGN America rumored as potential candidates. Feelers had been send out, and I hear there’s already interest from digital platforms and traditional cable networks in the package, which I hear is in very early stages with very little talent attached. Reps for Marvel refused any comment. The company has been so adamant about keeping its projects under wraps that ABC topper Paul Lee joked at TCA in August that critics who wanted to attend a screening of the Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. pilot — the only one in ages to not be distributed in advance — could expect to be asked to submit “a sample of your grandmother’s urine or the Marvel guys won’t let you in.” In addition to S.H.I.E.L.D., which was just given a full-season order, as we first reported, Marvel is developing a potential TV series inspired by Agent Carter, a one shot featured on the Blu-ray release of Iron Man 3. It is unclear whether that project is being earmarked for ABC or would be part of the VOD/cable package. Committing to 60 episodes off the bat is a big undertaking for a network/digital service but would make sense for outlets new to scripted programming that are looking to quickly build up a slate and want to capitalize on the Marvel brand.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby Lord Voldemoo on Thu Nov 07, 2013 1:09 pm

TheButcher wrote:Marvel Preps 60-Episode Package Of Four Series & A Mini For VOD & Cable Networks
NELLIE ANDREEVA wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
The notorious secrecy that surrounds Marvel‘s projects has been heightened to the nth degree for this one. No one would breathe a word, with rumors that everyone from top to bottom is bound by strict nondisclosure agreements, but I hear that Marvel is quietly putting together a package of four drama series and a miniseries — a total of some 60 episodes — that would be taken out to the VOD and cable space, with Netflix, Amazon and WGN America rumored as potential candidates. Feelers had been send out, and I hear there’s already interest from digital platforms and traditional cable networks in the package, which I hear is in very early stages with very little talent attached. Reps for Marvel refused any comment. The company has been so adamant about keeping its projects under wraps that ABC topper Paul Lee joked at TCA in August that critics who wanted to attend a screening of the Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. pilot — the only one in ages to not be distributed in advance — could expect to be asked to submit “a sample of your grandmother’s urine or the Marvel guys won’t let you in.” In addition to S.H.I.E.L.D., which was just given a full-season order, as we first reported, Marvel is developing a potential TV series inspired by Agent Carter, a one shot featured on the Blu-ray release of Iron Man 3. It is unclear whether that project is being earmarked for ABC or would be part of the VOD/cable package. Committing to 60 episodes off the bat is a big undertaking for a network/digital service but would make sense for outlets new to scripted programming that are looking to quickly build up a slate and want to capitalize on the Marvel brand.


It appears that this is now confirmed...and the partner is Netflix!

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/08/business/media/disney-and-netflix-in-deal-for-series-based-on-marvel-characters.html?_r=0

The streaming TV service on Thursday said it had acquired a package of four drama series and one mini-series – about 60 episodes – based on the Marvel characters of Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist and Luke Cage. Marvel and ABC Television Studios, divisions of the Walt Disney Company, will produce the programming, which will start to unspool on Netflix starting in 2015.

The programs will take viewers “deep into the gritty world of heroes and villains of Hell’s Kitchen, New York,” according to a statement from the companies. The four series will culminate in a mini-series called “The Defenders,” billed as an event “that reimagines a dream team of self-sacrificing heroic characters.”
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby so sorry on Thu Nov 07, 2013 3:27 pm

I gotta say I don't find this to be that big of a deal, and let me explain why: there are a number of cable channels right now that are littered with sci-fi and comic booky serial "drama" shows on. Admittedly most of those shows seem to be geared towards the teen girl market.
If anything, having these shows Netflix exclusives may hurt the programs IMO. It'll attract the true comic book fans, but it won't attract casual viewers that may have decided to give it a shot if it was on ABC for example.

Just my gut reaction...meh.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby Fievel on Thu Nov 07, 2013 4:41 pm

What a waste of Daredevil.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby Peven on Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:07 am

Fievel wrote:What a waste of Daredevil.


yeah, this just means that there won't be any DD movie for the foreseeable future
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby so sorry on Fri Nov 08, 2013 5:53 pm

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Wed Nov 13, 2013 12:01 am

Melissa Rosenberg To Shepherd Marvel’s Jessica Jones Series For Netflix

'Lost,' 'Buffy' Alum to Write, Run Disney's Netflix Drama 'Daredevil'
Drew Goddard is in final negotiations to write and serve as showrunner on the new take on the Marvel Comics hero.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 06, 2013 3:40 pm

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Wed Dec 11, 2013 8:36 pm

Disney CFO Talks 'Star Wars,' ESPN Competition, Deal Outlook
Georg Szalai wrote:Asked about the recent decision to create four Marvel series for Netflix rather than a traditional TV network, Rasulo said the firm did content for Disney XD to keep things close to home before launching Marvel's Agents of SHIELD on ABC. The Netflix deal came when the company was ready to look outside for distribution, he added. "It's a little bit like the Avengers strategy" with four superhero creation stories that should eventually lead the heroes together, he explained about the blueprint for the Netflix series.

"I'm not sure I would call [Netflix] our go-to SVOD partner," Rasulo emphasized Tuesday when asked if it was the main go-to-place for the company nowadays, highlighting that the firm has also done deals with Hulu and other digital distributors. And he said the Marvel show deal was also pitched to others. "We try to be even-handed and, of course, advantageous to Disney," he said about Disney's approach to deciding where to take content. "We are out there playing the field."
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Fri Feb 28, 2014 11:27 am

Meet the 1970s TV Avengers That Never Were (Video)
What if the Captain America from the 1979 TV movie teamed up with Lou Ferrigno's Hulk to fight Paul Lynde and Kiss?
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:22 pm

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Re: The Incredible Hulk

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 26, 2014 6:37 am

Hulk (Documentary)
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Thu Dec 04, 2014 7:49 pm

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Re: Welcome Back, Agent Kotter

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 07, 2015 10:38 am

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Re: Marvel TV

Postby Lord Voldemoo on Wed Jan 14, 2015 11:38 pm

I've seen the first 3 hours of Agent Carter, and I've enjoyed them, so far. Nice to see a strong female lead in the Marvel U.

It's not really original. Captain America era, somewhat Buffy-esque with a touch of Alias in that you have a super-capable badass woman surrounded by people who don't take her seriously, typical Marvel glowy MacGuffins everywhere, and a Stark. Plus the typewriter as a transmitter trick is SO Fringe 2009. But I like seeing the original, non-robot-presence Jarvis. The action is pretty good. I do enjoy Hayley Atwell a great deal. If you like her, you'll probably like the show ok.

i"m not blown away or completely sucked in yet, but there' some potential. I'm a little worried about actually liking the show because from what I've heard the ratings are pretty weak (though I guess are improving as DVR numbers come in), so it may be that we just get 8 episodes and then it's gone. But I'm sure I'll watch the remaining 5 this year, at minimum.
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Re: Marvel TV

Postby TheButcher on Tue Feb 03, 2015 11:38 pm

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TheButcher
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Re: Damage Control

Postby TheButcher on Sat Oct 03, 2015 7:14 am

Drew Pearce Talks About His Unproduced Marvel Screenplays
Graeme McMillan wrote:All Hail The King, the Marvel One-Shot short that appears on the Thor: The Dark World DVD and Blu-ray may mark Iron Man 3 screenwriter Drew Pearce's directorial debut on a Marvel Studios project, but it could have gone so differently.

"I'd been trying to direct and write a One-Shot for Marvel since Runaways was picked up," Pearce told Total Film magazine. "The One-Shot program comes in and out of existence at points, and you have to will the shorts to happen… I'd written a few different characters across a few One-Shots, and so when Sir Ben [Kingsley] said he'd do this one, oddly enough that tipped this over the line -- that one of the greatest actors of his generation was agreeing to do what is essentially my ridiculous student film."

Pearce talked about some of the One-Shots he's written that haven't ended up in production. "One that was Sin and Crossbones [the latter character will appear in Captain America: The Winter Soldier]," he revealed. "I love Jessica Jones, and while obviously Jessica Jones and Alias is NOW going to exist in the Netflix part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I'd always obsessively been trying to put her in stuff I'd been working with Marvel on… but about three or four other ones, too."

He also named his great Marvel white whale: "My Marvel obsession with Damage Control [a comedy series about the company tasked with cleaning up after large-scale superhero battles] is still there, but it's pretty difficult to make into a short," he said. "The clue is in the title that you have to do a lot of damage to then control it - and that's not really in the budget of a short movie. I just think it's got huge potential as a franchise."

Psst, Marvel: Given the success of Iron Man 3 and Pearce's apparent luck in focusing on properties that end up in development or use elsewhere on the Marvel Studios slate, maybe you should think about a Damage Control movie after all…
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