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MXC - Most Extreme Elimination Challenge (Takeshi's Castle)

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:03 pm
by Shyhalude
Fans?

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:05 pm
by Lord Voldemoo
sadly...yes. I love this show. It's my comfort blanket when nothing else is on. It makes me laugh hysterically.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:09 pm
by Brocktune
i too am a sucker for this show. although i could have sworn we have had this discussion previously......

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:11 pm
by Shyhalude

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:11 pm
by Bob Samonkey
I cannot get past the dubbing. If t was dubbed for real I think I would enjoy it more. Seems to me like they are saying "Boy these guys sho do talk funny, lets make fun of them."

On the other hand, The dubbed anime on cartoon network during April Fools Day where they added farting nosies but kept everything else the same...Priceless.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:13 pm
by colonel_lugz
Are we talking about Takeshis Castle?

if so I am a massive fan!!! god bless Kitano!

Stepping Stones is the most brutal game ever and Bridgeball is hilarious

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:22 pm
by Brocktune
Bob Poopflingius Maximus wrote:I cannot get past the dubbing. If t was dubbed for real I think I would enjoy it more. Seems to me like they are saying "Boy these guys sho do talk funny, lets make fun of them."


really?

i always thought of it as just trying to be as juvenile, and as scatalogically clever as possible. and believe me i am hyper-sensitive to issues of disrespect where the japanese are concerned.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:24 pm
by Bob Samonkey
Brocktune wrote:
Bob Poopflingius Maximus wrote:I cannot get past the dubbing. If t was dubbed for real I think I would enjoy it more. Seems to me like they are saying "Boy these guys sho do talk funny, lets make fun of them."


really?

i always thought of it as just trying to be as juvenile, and as scatalogically clever as possible. and believe me i am hyper-sensitive to issues of disrespect where the japanese are concerned.


Mayhaps, but Istill just cannot get past it. I think I would like the show otherwise...

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:26 pm
by Lord Voldemoo
Brocktune wrote:i too am a sucker for this show. although i could have sworn we have had this discussion previously......


I think that was here, Brock:

http://zone.aintitcool.com/viewtopic.php?t=2317&highlight=mxc

I think MXC deserves its own coax thread...

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:30 pm
by Brocktune
word.

thats probably why i couldnt find it.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:33 pm
by John-Locke
colonel_lugz wrote:Are we talking about Takeshis Castle?

if so I am a massive fan!!! god bless Kitano!

Stepping Stones is the most brutal game ever and Bridgeball is hilarious


Takeshis Castle works much better than MXC because you have Craig Charles calling everyone a wazzock and doing a hilarious commentary instead of two bozo's thinking they are doing a hilarious dub.

It just works much better.

Stepping Stones and bridgeball rule, High Rollers rules, the soup bowl one rules and Boulder Dash Rules.

Animal also Rules.

O'Doyle Rules!

(Sorry, just a random Billy Madison quote inspired by everything ruling)

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:40 pm
by Brocktune
San Dimas High School football RULES!

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:55 pm
by Bob Samonkey
Whoa. Strange things are afoot at the Circle K

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:53 pm
by monorail77
Love this show. I actually think the writing is pretty clever. They deliver more puns and double entenders per minute than you can shake a weiner at.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:21 pm
by minstrel
MXC is terrific. I find it hilarious. I love the way it's dubbed - puns on top of puns until I can't keep up! And the visuals, of course, are priceless. I love that, when someone really wipes out bigtime, they show the replay over and over, WHAM WHAM WHAM, to the point of idiot comedy bliss.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:31 pm
by Brocktune
ah good times.

when ive been ripped enough, ive actually come close to laughing myself literally to death at this show. watching them replay those injuries over and over again.

huh, and they tried to tell my parents that i was "gifted".

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:34 pm
by Lord Voldemoo
Brocktune wrote:huh, and they tried to tell my parents that i was "gifted".


Well, that was your Special Ed teacher, Brock. It's all relative, man.

:wink:

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:45 pm
by Brocktune
aye.
the truth hurts. it herts!

but let this be a lesson to all of you future parents.

inhalants are bad!

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:52 pm
by wonkabar
Whip it good

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:54 pm
by Brocktune
no, whip it bad.

ask my special ed teacher.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:56 pm
by wonkabar
special Ed

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:57 pm
by Bob Samonkey
He's just a little bit special...

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 11:35 pm
by wonkabar
mmmmshihaluuuuuuude

PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:58 am
by MiltonWaddams
I just like how poorly put together the show is. Somehow watching a person get beat up is gruesome and awful, but when they do even more damage to themselves it's comedy gold.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:27 am
by Ribbons
I'm more entranced by the show itself than by the dubbing. It doesn't annoy me so much, but I'd just as soon watch it on mute. That game show is brutal.

Re: MXC - Most Extreme Elimination Challenge (Takeshi's Cast

PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2011 6:26 am
by TheButcher
Takeshi Kitano FTW!

From THR:
Is ABC's 'Wipeout' a Rip-Off? (Analysis)
After mediation fails, a copyright case -- in which the wacky obstacle-course competition series is accused of copying original elements of six Japanese shows, including "Takeshi's Castle" and "Most Extreme Elimination Challenge" -- is headed to a key hearing.

Matthew Belloni wrote: In 1996's Swingers, Vince Vaughn, Jon Favreau and their fellow wannabe actors debate whether Quentin Tarantino ripped off a slow-motion sequence in Reservoir Dogs from Martin Scorsese. "Everybody steals from everybody," Vaughn's character announces. "That's Hollywood."

The Swingers maxim is true throughout showbiz, but perhaps it most accurately describes one particular segment of Hollywood: Reality TV. Since Survivor kicked off the U.S. boom in unscripted, narrative programming 11 years ago, the niche has been littered with more copycat shows and derivative concepts than hit original formats. American Idol, the official U.S. version of Britain's Pop Idol, spawned countless singing elimination shows. History's Pawn Stars begat Hard Core Pawn, Pawn Queens and the rest. Producers of ABC's Wife Swap once sued the makers of Fox's similar family switcheroo series Trading Spouses.

Owing to what might be a knee-jerk reaction against protecting the creativity in a genre dubbed "reality," as well as a lack of clarity in copyright law, many producers believe there is a Wild West mentality in the unscripted world that has given rise to a culture of rampant, unlicensed borrowing. Not helping matters was a leaked 2008 memo from ABC executive vp Howard Davine, urging execs and showrunners to "carefully scrutinize" whether licensing foreign formats was "necessary or appropriate" before going forward with similar shows, especially when they might only be interested in the "general, underlying premise." The memo didn't specifically target reality shows, but it drew the ire of the Format Recognition and Protection Association, an international group pushing for intellectual property rights for unscripted TV formats. FRAPA suggested that producers consider helping themselves to the "underlying premise" of Disney's Hannah Montana and Mickey Mouse.

Against that backdrop, a lawsuit coming to a head in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles might determine where a court will draw the line on copyright infringement in reality TV. The case, filed in 2008 against ABC by Japan's Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS), claims that ABC's wacky obstacle-course competition Wipeout copied original elements of six TBS shows, including Takeshi's Castle, Most Extreme Elimination Challenge (MXC), Sasuke and Ninja Warrior. The suit alleges that ABC and Wipeout producer Endemol set out to replicate the TBS shows, lifted popular components and even sought to manipulate Google into sending traffic for search terms "Takeshi's Castle" and "Ninja Warrior" to a Wipeout-sponsored link. The case, which is being litigated by showbiz powerhouses Stanton "Larry" Stein (for TBS) and Patty Glaser, with former partner Devin McRae (for ABC), has a key summary judgment hearing this summer after a May 12 mediation failed to produce a settlement.

Crucial to the case is which elements of the TBS shows are unique enough to warrant copyright protection (what lawyers call the "protectable" vs. "nonprotectable" elements). In court papers, ABC argues that TBS "remarkably claims copyright protection in obstacles and obstacle concepts ubiquitous in the public domain, such as 'rope swings,' 'mechanical bulls' and 'pole vaults.' " The network points out TV's history of obstacle-course competitions, from the BBC's It's a Knockout in the '60s to ABC's Battle of the Network Stars in the '70s to Fear Factor, the 2001-06 NBC series from Endemol, produced by Wipeout co-creators Matt Kunitz and Scott Larsen. Wipeout, ABC argues, uses only general scenes a faire, rather than any unique, and thus copyrightable, expression.

Considering the limited number of reality-TV tropes available to producers, ABC makes a compelling argument. Still, when Judge Margaret Nagle sits down to watch Wipeout and the six TBS shows (a good reason to give federal jurists raises), she will likely notice alarming similarities. Wipeout's "Cookie Cutter" contraption appears nearly identical to MXC's "Rotating Surfboard of Death," as do the wisecracking hosts. Ditto Wipeout's "Hopping Blocks" and Sasuke's "Six Jumps." And so on. How many similarities are too many?

Therein lies the larger question beyond the minutia of the Wipeout case: What aspects of any reality show are subject to legal protection? In a genre where the traditional plot and character aspects of scripted works have been replaced by unique formats, the law might need to evolve to protect the creativity that informs this powerful segment of the TV world.