Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Discuss all the finest actors, living or dead -- their films, their talents, and their weird, drug-related escapades.

Big name star or recogisable series?

I see films for the people acting in them
2
8%
I don't care who's in them, as long as it's a good film
13
52%
I hate films with big stars in them
0
No votes
I look for the director's name
7
28%
The studio behind it holds some weight
0
No votes
KONG
3
12%
 
Total votes : 25

Re: DEATH OF THE MOVIE STAR - R.I.P.

Postby BuckyO'harre on Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:25 pm

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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby Seppuku on Sun Mar 28, 2010 11:03 pm

Cracking work, Buckmeister!

Sage- kindly to be doing search before starting of the thread, thank you. Although this is the kind of thread that'd be a bitch to search for. If you're not sure, you can always ask here: Is There an <Insert Phrase> Thread Here? Or just ask Kirk; he's responsible for about 93% of the Movie Discussion threads here.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Mon May 24, 2010 5:03 am

From Motion Captured:
How Spider-Man lost the lead role in 'Rise Of The Apes' to the Green Goblin
Moriarty wrote:It's an interesting moment for Tobey Maguire.

When he was playing Spider-Man on a regular basis, Maguire was a movie star by default. If you star in a film that makes $800 million or so worldwide, you're potentially bankable. If you star in two, you're a potential star. You star in three? That's a rare club. Maguire's done it. Three giant giant movies.

But aside from those three films, has he ever really opened a movie? I like a lot of his work. I just wrote about "Ride With The Devil" the other day, and a big part of that film's sucess is Maguire's work. He's very real, very sincere and sweet as a guy who does some brutal things during the Civil War. I'm hoping there's a Criterion Blu-ray version of "The Ice Storm" coming soon, because I love that movie. That's my favorite film of 1997, and the work of the young cast like Maguire and Christina Ricci and Elijah Wood is a big part of why I think the film is amazing. "Pleasantville" and "Wonder Boys" are both rich and interesting films I'll happily discuss with anyone at length. Films that reward return visits. So Maguire's got taste. He's capable of doing really strong and challenging work. I root for him. I like enough of what he's done to feel invested. You know how it is for some actors... you just plain like them on film.

But I do wonder... is Tobey Maguire a movie star by any conventional definition at this point?

If he's not playing Spider-Man, what is he worth at the box-office?
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby minstrel on Mon May 24, 2010 2:11 pm

I never thought of Tobey Maguire as a movie "star". He's an actor. He became mostly famous playing a superhero in popular movies, but the character was the star, not Maguire.

Is Adam West a TV star because he played Batman? You wouldn't think so, given his subsequent career.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jun 15, 2010 6:36 am

From Cinematical:
Are Today's Stars Easily Replaceable?

From JAM:
Blockbuster stars easily replaced
MICHAEL RECHTSHAFFEN wrote:HOLLYWOOD — Memo to Bradley Cooper, Sam Worthington, Zoe Saldana and anybody else who starred in a hit movie bound for sequel glory.

Don’t, to quote the mighty Beyonce, you ever for a second get to thinking you’re irreplaceable.

Just ask Megan Fox, who played opposite Shia LaBeouf in the first two Transformers movies, but not the third, currently in production.

Or Terrence Howard, who originated the role of Rhodey in Iron Man, only to see it commandeered by Don Cheadle for this summer’s smash sequel.

Or Twilight Saga regulars Kellan Lutz and Ashley Greene, who reportedly came this close to being replaced in the two Breaking Dawn movies over a salary dispute.

Undoubtedly wanting to avoid a Rachelle Lefevre situation (her Victoria character was assumed by Bryce Dallas Howard for the upcoming Eclipse instalment), Lutz and Greene ultimately opted not to push too hard.

The thing is, unless you happen to go by the name of Pattinson, Lautner or Stewart, these days there are very few instances where an actor is indispensable to the vehicle that shot him or her to the top of the box-office charts.

When it comes right down to it — sorry Shia — it’s those awesome Autobots and devious Decepticons that are the true draw of the Transformers movies.

Even Tobey Maguire and director Sam Raimi weren’t bullet-proof when the fourth round of negotiations started up for an addendum to the Spider-Man trilogy.

Contending that there wouldn’t be enough creative breathing room to meet Sony Pictures’ original May 6, 2011 release date, Raimi walked, Maguire followed and the studio gave the remaining players the boot and Spidey 4 a reboot, complete with a fresh-faced, younger cast and an origins storyline.

Even though Beverly Hills Chihuahua was a big studly hit, Disney decided that the main audience draw was those talking wiener dogs rather than the actors who lent them their voices.

So Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2 went before the cameras last fall minus the talents of Drew Barrymore, Andy Garcia, Piper Perabo and company.

In addition to new canine characters, Jamie Lee Curtis was deemed too pricey to reprise her live action Aunt Viv and was replaced by Susan Blakely.

Of course, it’s not always about money.

Sometimes actors don’t return for their encore as a result of those mysterious “creative differences,” which is usually code for “was difficult on set.”

In the case of Ms. Fox, the fact that she was declined a return invitation to the Transformers series could be attributed to various ongoing theories.

The first would concern her public disses of her two-time director Michael Bay, whom she has likened to both Hitler and Napoleon.

The second floating conjecture would have to do with Bay’s reported displeasure with Fox’s ultra-gaunt appearance, and since she wouldn’t agree to put back the pounds, he replaced her with decidedly curvier Victoria’s Secret model Rosie Huntington-Whiteley.

Then again, maybe Fox simply wanted a bigger paycheque.

Whatever the reason, may her Transformers 3 kiss-off serve as a warning to all those who think that a sequel gives them licence to play the diva.

To paraphrase Beyonce, they can have another you by tomorrow.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Jun 15, 2010 9:17 am

TheButcher wrote:From Cinematical:
Are Today's Stars Easily Replaceable?

From JAM:
Blockbuster stars easily replaced
MICHAEL RECHTSHAFFEN wrote:HOLLYWOOD — Memo to Bradley Cooper, Sam Worthington, Zoe Saldana and anybody else who starred in a hit movie bound for sequel glory.

Don’t, to quote the mighty Beyonce, you ever for a second get to thinking you’re irreplaceable.

Just ask Megan Fox, who played opposite Shia LaBeouf in the first two Transformers movies, but not the third, currently in production.

Or Terrence Howard, who originated the role of Rhodey in Iron Man, only to see it commandeered by Don Cheadle for this summer’s smash sequel.

Or Twilight Saga regulars Kellan Lutz and Ashley Greene, who reportedly came this close to being replaced in the two Breaking Dawn movies over a salary dispute.

Undoubtedly wanting to avoid a Rachelle Lefevre situation (her Victoria character was assumed by Bryce Dallas Howard for the upcoming Eclipse instalment), Lutz and Greene ultimately opted not to push too hard.

The thing is, unless you happen to go by the name of Pattinson, Lautner or Stewart, these days there are very few instances where an actor is indispensable to the vehicle that shot him or her to the top of the box-office charts.

When it comes right down to it — sorry Shia — it’s those awesome Autobots and devious Decepticons that are the true draw of the Transformers movies.

Even Tobey Maguire and director Sam Raimi weren’t bullet-proof when the fourth round of negotiations started up for an addendum to the Spider-Man trilogy.

Contending that there wouldn’t be enough creative breathing room to meet Sony Pictures’ original May 6, 2011 release date, Raimi walked, Maguire followed and the studio gave the remaining players the boot and Spidey 4 a reboot, complete with a fresh-faced, younger cast and an origins storyline.

Even though Beverly Hills Chihuahua was a big studly hit, Disney decided that the main audience draw was those talking wiener dogs rather than the actors who lent them their voices.

So Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2 went before the cameras last fall minus the talents of Drew Barrymore, Andy Garcia, Piper Perabo and company.

In addition to new canine characters, Jamie Lee Curtis was deemed too pricey to reprise her live action Aunt Viv and was replaced by Susan Blakely.

Of course, it’s not always about money.

Sometimes actors don’t return for their encore as a result of those mysterious “creative differences,” which is usually code for “was difficult on set.”

In the case of Ms. Fox, the fact that she was declined a return invitation to the Transformers series could be attributed to various ongoing theories.

The first would concern her public disses of her two-time director Michael Bay, whom she has likened to both Hitler and Napoleon.

The second floating conjecture would have to do with Bay’s reported displeasure with Fox’s ultra-gaunt appearance, and since she wouldn’t agree to put back the pounds, he replaced her with decidedly curvier Victoria’s Secret model Rosie Huntington-Whiteley.

Then again, maybe Fox simply wanted a bigger paycheque.

Whatever the reason, may her Transformers 3 kiss-off serve as a warning to all those who think that a sequel gives them licence to play the diva.

To paraphrase Beyonce, they can have another you by tomorrow.


wait a sec. did the author of the 2nd article just take the first article and rewrite it in his own words? or the other way around? because, with the exception of "beverly hills chihuahua", they reference the exact same actors, in the exact same films, in the exact same order, to make the exact same points.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby RogueScribner on Tue Jun 15, 2010 12:42 pm

There's a link to the 2nd article in the first article.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby Peven on Tue Jun 15, 2010 1:16 pm

these people make a living writing that shit?
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby RogueScribner on Tue Jun 15, 2010 1:55 pm

Jealous?
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby Peven on Tue Jun 15, 2010 3:07 pm

RogueScribner wrote:Jealous?


sure i am jealous that no talent hacks like that are being paid to write brainless crap. i wrote better fake articles for my reporting class in college and i bet a whole bunch of people could do better as well, they just don't know the right people to get the job
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby minstrel on Tue Jun 15, 2010 3:12 pm

Peven wrote:
RogueScribner wrote:Jealous?


sure i am jealous that no talent hacks like that are being paid to write brainless crap. i wrote better fake articles for my reporting class in college and i bet a whole bunch of people could do better as well, they just don't know the right people to get the job


Start your sentences with capital letters, Peven. And finish them with periods or other appropriate punctuation marks. Then you'll be on your way! (And maybe you would have passed that reporting class in college.)

:wink:
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby Peven on Tue Jun 15, 2010 4:10 pm

minstrel wrote:
Peven wrote:
RogueScribner wrote:Jealous?


sure i am jealous that no talent hacks like that are being paid to write brainless crap. i wrote better fake articles for my reporting class in college and i bet a whole bunch of people could do better as well, they just don't know the right people to get the job


Start your sentences with capital letters, Peven. And finish them with periods or other appropriate punctuation marks. Then you'll be on your way! (And maybe you would have passed that reporting class in college.)

:wink:


capitalization and punctuation are tools of the Man used to keep us down......





....and i got a 92 in Reporting, thank you very much :-P
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby minstrel on Tue Jun 15, 2010 4:18 pm

Peven wrote:capitalization and punctuation are tools of the Man used to keep us down......

....and i got a 92 in Reporting, thank you very much :-P


The 92 you got in Reporting was a tool of the Man used to keep you down.

... maybe.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:47 pm

Peven wrote:
minstrel wrote:
Peven wrote:
RogueScribner wrote:Jealous?


sure i am jealous that no talent hacks like that are being paid to write brainless crap. i wrote better fake articles for my reporting class in college and i bet a whole bunch of people could do better as well, they just don't know the right people to get the job


Start your sentences with capital letters, Peven. And finish them with periods or other appropriate punctuation marks. Then you'll be on your way! (And maybe you would have passed that reporting class in college.)

:wink:


capitalization and punctuation are tools of the Man used to keep us down......





....and i got a 92 in Reporting, thank you very much :-P



DAMN THE MAN!
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Tue Nov 23, 2010 4:36 am

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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Sun Jul 10, 2011 10:24 pm

From The Big Picture:
Is Hollywood quietly giving its stars the NBA and NFL lockout treatment?
Patrick Goldstein wrote:On the surface, the sports and Hollywood labor disputes seem to have a lot in common. After all, if there were ever an entity whose rulers bore a strikingly close resemblance to the mandarins who run the entertainment business, it would be the NFL, a fabulously successful sports enterprise with the wealthiest owners, the smallest salaries and players with the shortest careers that has still decided it needs to squeeze a better deal from its on-the-field talent.

But the fact is, Hollywood execs have some advantages that the owners of the big pro sports teams don't.

Just a few short years ago, studios felt compelled to pay top dollar to stars who could open big summer movies. But nowadays, its almost impossible to find a major summer franchise film (excepting "Pirates of the Caribbean") anchored to a major star. "Thor's" Chris Hemsworth suddenly has a lot in common with the Oklahoma City Thunder’s Russell Westbrook -- they're both fresh-faced players that work for a relatively cheap price.

Judging from this summer's output of star-free studio movies, the major difference between the sports world and Hollywood is that showbiz moguls have actually found a way to promote their product without having to rely on the costliest element in the talent equation -- the star. "X-Men" and "Transformers" are saleable brands, even without a big name on the marquee. The studios are operating a lot like small-market sports teams like the Tampa Bay Rays -- they're building box-office behemoths using younger, comparatively underpaid talent.

"All these acrimonious labor disputes in sports derive from the owners believing that the players have gotten too big a piece of the pie," said veteran movie producer Joe Roth, who is the majority owner of the Seattle Sounders soccer club. "Hollywood is doing the same thing, but simply in a quieter way. They're using the reduction of DVD revenues as a legitimate, and often not so legitimate, excuse to cut back on talent expenses and downsize their labor force."

Writers Guild board member Howard Rodman, who penned the script for the film "Savage Grace" and is a candidate for the vice presidency in the union's upcoming election, agrees.

"It may not be as dramatic as what's happening in sports, but we're seeing a steady effort on the part of the studios to erode the status and union power of writers, actors and directors," he said. "In the feature-writing business, quotes don't mean anything anymore - -now the studios work backwards from what they're willing to pay for a job, and if you don't take the offer, they move on. The size of writing staffs are smaller. The studios are chipping away at everything involving talent."

It's actually been easier for Hollywood's media conglomerates to cut their talent costs than for their brethren in the pro basketball world, which is why NBA owners pushed for a lockout, even when the league was enjoying record TV ratings and vast fan appeal. The NBA's biggest concern involves something Hollywood doesn't have to brood about: achieving parity between franchises that are perpetual winners and franchises that are perennial also-rans.

"NBA players simply control their destiny far more than management, which is why you see LeBron James going to Miami," said director-producer Mike Tollin, who has made a wide variety of sports-themed movies, TV shows and documentaries, directing the film "Radio" and the award-winning documentary "Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream."

"For the NBA, increased revenue sharing is a way to allow teams to compete on a level playing field, so a Sacramento Kings fan can have some of the same sense of hope and possibility going into a new season as a Lakers fan. You don't have the same kind of partisan fandom in Hollywood. Nobody roots for Paramount or Warners," Tollin said. "But everyone has labor costs and in the NBA, you have 30 individual owners who aren't part of a multinational media company, so they simply don't have as many ways as Hollywood does to amortize their expenses.”

But just ask any Cleveland Cavaliers fan: In the NBA, it's a steep drop off from LeBron James to Anderson Varejao. That's why, in the long run, athletes will end up being more successful at protecting their interests than movie stars and screenwriters. Some talent is more expendable than others.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 24, 2012 1:18 am

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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby RogueScribner on Thu May 24, 2012 1:39 am

I used to be a huge fan of Johnny Depp, but his post-Pirates career has been underwhelming. It's just shtick now. Overblown shtick.

And the couple of times recently he's played it "straight", it's been incredibly boring (I'm looking at you Public Enemies and The Tourist).
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby so sorry on Thu May 24, 2012 8:46 am

Adam Sandler was once an A-lister?????
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby justcheckin on Tue Aug 07, 2012 7:43 pm

RogueScribner wrote:I used to be a huge fan of Johnny Depp, but his post-Pirates career has been underwhelming. It's just shtick now. Overblown shtick.

And the couple of times recently he's played it "straight", it's been incredibly boring (I'm looking at you Public Enemies and The Tourist).



Does anyone think Johnny Depp looks more and more like Captain Jack Sparrow in real life? I wonder if he is loosing touch... just a tiny bit. Reality is sorta floating away.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby Bloo on Tue Aug 07, 2012 11:22 pm

I thought he was really good in The Rum Diary
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Re: Is the era of the manly movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jul 08, 2015 7:50 pm

Michael Douglas: American Actors Too ‘Asexual or Unisex’ for Most Movie Roles
Michael Douglas thinks British and Australian actors are taking American jobs because Hollywood’s current crop of stars aren’t masculine enough for most film roles.
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Re: Is the era of the manly movie star over?

Postby so sorry on Thu Jul 09, 2015 8:41 am

TheButcher wrote:Michael Douglas: American Actors Too ‘Asexual or Unisex’ for Most Movie Roles
Michael Douglas thinks British and Australian actors are taking American jobs because Hollywood’s current crop of stars aren’t masculine enough for most film roles.



Nice. Give 'em hell old man!
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Thu Sep 29, 2016 1:36 am

LA Times:
Olivia de Havilland: The actress who took on the studio system and won

OUR BRAND SPANKIN’ NEW STAR SYSTEM
Neil Turitz wrote:I really love show business. I don’t always enjoy working in it, but otherwise, I’m a pretty huge fan. I like reading about it, seeing documentaries about it, listening to podcasts about it, whatever is going to tell me more about the history of Hollywood and the people who have worked in it, creating all this fantastic (and awful) stuff we have watched and enjoyed (and hated) over the decades.

Because of that, I’m pretty well schooled on how things used to be, especially the old studio system, which basically indentured actors to long contracts that put them completely under the control of the men who ran the studios. This allowed these fellows to personally make and break careers, and pass the actors back and forth like chattel, loaning them out to each other when the spirit, and dollars, moved them.

This system eventually fell apart, of course, passing into history like silent films and the Hollywood Canteen, but not without doing plenty of damage before it did.

Over the years, the whole idea of being a movie star has changed. It’s something I’ve discussed a time or two over the last few months, but will mention again. Whereas there used to be genuine stars whose very presence in a picture could almost guarantee a sizable audience, that’s not really the case anymore. Yes, there are still a select few men and women who can draw the crowds — Tom Cruise, Leonardo DiCaprio, Sandra Bullock, and Denzel Washington immediately come to mind — but otherwise, more often than not it’s the concept that’s the star these days, not the actors.

At least, that’s what the major studios would probably have you believe.

Over the years, they have stopped paying the big salaries they used to pay and cut down on the vanity deals they would hand out to actors and their production shingles. Remember Matthew McConaughey’s j.k. livin productions? It had an overhead deal with New Line for a spell before the company decided that it wasn’t actually getting anything out of the agreement and didn’t renew it. Nothing against McConaughey, of course, but it’s not like his shingle was terribly prolific. The thing was, while he was drawing audiences to theaters, it was worth the studio’s money to be in business with him. Once the economy took a downturn and the studios were forced to tighten their belts, a lot of those types of deals went by the wayside.

Alright, alright, alright, nobody get angry, because I’m not picking on McConaughey, I’m just using him and his company (which actually no longer functions as a production entity and focuses instead as a nonprofit dedicated to empowering high school students) to make a point. While there are plenty of producing deals still in play — for the likes of Leo and Robert Downey, Jr., (both at Warner Bros.), George Clooney and Grant Heslov, Will Smith (Sony), Elizabeth Banks, and Vin Diesel (Universal), just to name a few — those are for companies that were actively producing successful films. Successful films mean money for the studios, and that’s what it’s all about. Money talks and the vanity deals that used to be in play are no longer, because eventually it was no longer worth it to keep them around. Those kinds of deals used to be everywhere, and then they weren’t. End of story.

But now things have started to shift again. The thing is, the idea of the True Movie Star has definitely plateaued in the wake of the Concept, which is now king. We’ve discussed this before, that studio movies are currently as much about merchandising and brand management as they are about entertainment, and I’m not here to talk about that again, because we’ve covered it enough. What’s interesting, though, is when the studios get behind a Concept that they deem successful enough to start a franchise. This leaves them on the hook for it and beholden to the talent who helped it make it thus.

Which brings us to Margot Robbie and the sweet deal she just signed with Warner Bros. to produce movies for them in which she will also star. One of those, obviously, is the Harley Quinn spinoff from Suicide Squad, which the studio desperately wants to see happen. This gives Robbie all the leverage. Which leads to her getting said deal that also includes the prestige project Queen of the Air, in which she will also star and produce under her suddenly very productive shingle, LuckyChap Entertainment. Because of course it does. I mean, if you’re going to agree to have another go round as a comic book character, you might as well get to do one or two for yourself, too, and on the studio’s dime.

I actually love this, because after all these years of studios calling the shots, a deal like this puts the power firmly in the hands of an up-and-comer like Robbie. She now gets to take control of her career in a way that few actors have been able to do at such a young age, because the studio badly needs her and her rising star power, and will give her a lot to continue to have access to it.

Yes, she has been very lucky, but she’s also very good, and has set a precedent for other actors who come into a project, knock it out of the park, and make themselves indispensable. The shoe is firmly on the other foot, and it’s more than a little entertaining to see.

It’s a unique situation that shouldn’t be so. This should, by all rights, be the first of a bunch of these kinds of deals, but I’m not sure how realistic that is. For one thing, Robbie is a special case, not just because of her talent and her connection to this particular role, but also because of Warner Bros.’ focus on female-driven storytelling. For another, roles like Harley Quinn don’t come along all that often for other actors to exploit for such purposes.

But, the fact that both talent and studio recognized that she had them by the proverbial short hairs is a step in the right direction. Now, we just need to take more such steps. A lot more, because the more of these deals that get made, the higher the likelihood that the studios start making good movies again, movies that aren’t just a line item in a merchandising plan.

Of course, that might be too much to ask, but a boy can dream.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Tue Oct 04, 2016 11:09 pm

Kim Kardashian Assailants Still at Large After Paris Heist
The robbers held Kardashian up at gunpoint and locked her in a bathroom before escaping on bicycles in the early hours of Monday.
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby Ribbons on Wed Oct 05, 2016 2:20 am

haha what the fuck? Butcher, stop glitching!
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby so sorry on Wed Oct 05, 2016 9:20 am

Ribbons wrote:haha what the fuck? Butcher, stop glitching!



I guess we don't have a "Is the Era of the C-list Reality TV star over?" thread...
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Re: Is the era of the A-list movie star over?

Postby TheButcher on Wed Oct 05, 2016 9:53 am

so sorry wrote:
Ribbons wrote:
TheButcher wrote:Kim Kardashian Assailants Still at Large After Paris Heist
The robbers held Kardashian up at gunpoint and locked her in a bathroom before escaping on bicycles in the early hours of Monday.


haha what the fuck? Butcher, stop glitching!



I guess we don't have a "Is the Era of the C-list Reality TV star over?" thread...

Police have released an image of the robbers!
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