Kubrickian Classics

Which director made the best films, made the best visuals, or smelled the best? This is the forum to find out.

Kubrick, take your pick...

2001
17
23%
Barry Lyndon
5
7%
A Clockwork Orange
12
16%
Dr. Strangelove
18
24%
Full Metal Jacket
5
7%
The Killing
1
1%
Lolita
2
3%
Paths of Glory
0
No votes
The Shining
11
15%
Eyes Wide Shut
4
5%
 
Total votes : 75

Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 11, 2011 8:59 pm

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Re: The Shining

Postby TheButcher on Mon Sep 19, 2011 2:32 am

From BC:
Super-Rare Uncut Version Of The Shining To Screen In New York
Brendon Connelly wrote:Back when The Shining was released, distribution patterns were very different than today. During their first week, films would be found in just a few cinemas, and not the thousands that are now typical.

Stanley Kubrick certainly liked to take advantage of this. Perhaps most famously he axed 19 minutes from 2001: A Space Odyssey shortly after it had premiered; scenes that went undiscovered until last December and, as yet, have not be screened publically again.

He also re-edited The Shining a few days after it first started screening, in this case trimming away around four minutes. I’m not sure how often this first of the film’s three versions has been seen, but it won’t have been a lot.

So you’ll believe me when I tell you that I really wish I could be in New York this October 22nd.

Here’s a little bit of program information from the website of the Dryden Theatre, who will be screening the film on that date:
An unstable writer (Jack Nicholson) takes a winter caretaking job at a snowed-in mountain lodge, quickly succumbs to “cabin fever” — or is it something far worse? — and terrorizes his hapless wife (Shelley Duvall) and creepy, psychic son (Danny Lloyd). A brilliant study of domestic abuse and possession — demonic, creative, and familial — this is Kubrick’s horror masterpiece as you’ve never seen it, complete with a chilling coda cut from the original release.

As I was saying, this coda did actually play for a few days in cinemas (some say three, some four) before Stanley got busy with the scissors.

The scenes in question come directly before the film’s climactic push-in towards the photo.

Firstly, there’s a little moment where some state troopers look for Jack, frozen in the ice, but don’t seem to be seeing him – for whatever reason.

Then a longer scene. It’s set in a hospital, where Ullman, the Overlook’s manager, tries to convince Wendy and Danny that nothing supernatural had happened in his hotel. He explains that Jack’s body was not recovered, and he gives Danny a tennis ball – presumably the same one that he followed into room 237.

A few still images from the shooting of the hospital scene were published in Taschen’s Stanley Kubrick Archives, and proved easy to find online, but there’s no public record – that I can find – of the dialogue in the scene. So, if you’re going along in October, please take a notepad.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Al Shut on Mon Sep 19, 2011 5:09 am

What, no outcry that whoever is screening this is raping our collective childhoods?
Note to myself: Fix this image shit!
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby TonyWilson on Mon Sep 19, 2011 8:57 am

Seeing as they are not making the alternative version the only available one, no.
Elitism is positing that your taste is equivalent to quality, you hate "Hamlet" does it make it "bad"? If you think so, you're one elite motherfucker.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby TheBaxter on Mon Sep 19, 2011 11:14 am

the exorcist is one of my favorite films, and when the exorcist was re-released with a bunch of changes, i saw it first in theaters, then on the new DVD (i already had the original DVD). some of the changes i liked (like the spider walk scene), some i had no opinion of at all, some were just silly (the overuse of faces flashing in the dark in certain scenes for instance), and some, in particular the ending, were absolutely horrible. when i go back to watch the exorcist, once in a while i'll put in the new version to see those added scenes that i liked, but the vast majority of the time i prefer to watch the original version. thankfully, when they released the exorcist on blu-ray, it contained both cuts of the film. if they had only released the 2nd version, with the fucked up ending, i probably would have refused to buy it and stuck to watching the original on DVD. just like i still am waiting for the extended edition of Wrath of Khan, easily my favorite Trek film, before buying it on BR, since they only released the theatrical cut on BR. just like i waited for the extended editions of the LOTR films. i won't buy a film unless it's the version of that film i like. and then with Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind, another of my favorite films, there's 4 different versions of that film on the blu-ray. i usually watch the director's cut, it's what i was used to watching on tv growing up, but i'm glad to have all 4 and i can pick my preferred version to watch.

sadly, george lucas will never give us that option. there are at least 4 versions of the OT films by now (5 of the first one if you count the pre-Episode IV release), the originals, the SEs, the post-prequel SEs, and now the BR versions (and you know there's another version on the way when they convert to 3D). and we're only allowed to see one of them, and it's not the one most of us want to see. and there's not even a decent DVD copy of that version available either. fuck George Lucas.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby so sorry on Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:05 pm

Yeah I'll jump on this bandwagon as well: this version of the Shining is NOT replacing the existing version, so I'm cool with it. I'm actually more than cool with it, I'm exciting about it. I think I have the Shining somewhere in my DVD collection, but if they release a version next year with the original and this version, I'll be all over that sucker.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Nice Marmot on Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:43 pm

What, no hedge lions? Waaaaaahhhhhhhhh . . . !!!!!
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Re: Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange

Postby TheButcher on Mon Dec 19, 2011 8:55 pm

From Hero Complex:

‘A Clockwork Orange’: Kubrick classic arrived 40 years ago today
Juhani Nurmi wrote:Forty years ago today, Stanley Kubrick’s “A Clockwork Orange” arrived in U.S. theaters and immediately scorched a place in cinema history. To look back at the anger and art, Finnish film journalist Juhani Nurmi sat down with the late Kubrick’s brother-in-law and longtime collaborator, Jan Harlan, to write the following article for Hero Complex. The German-born Harlan (brother of Christiane Harlan Kubrick) was an executive producer on four Kubrick feature films (“Barry Lyndon” in 1975, “The Shining” in 1980, “Full Metal Jacket” in 1987 and “Eyes Wide Shut” in 1999.) He also directed the documentary “Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures” in 2001.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby magicmonkey on Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:03 am

Interesting Interview, if only for that pic of STANLEY KUBRICK'S SHIN!!!1 Beholdeth the shin of the master.
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"It's Kubrickian!" ‘Room 237′

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:04 pm

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Re: Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 24, 2012 1:26 am

From /film:
Hero Complex Film Festival 2012 Recap Featuring Behind The Scenes Stories from A Clockwork Orange, Serenity, Wall-E, Shaun of the Dead And More
A Clockwork Orange – Q&A Featuring Star Malcolm McDowell

* Malcom McDowell on The Avengers – “It’s noisy, isn’t it?” He thought the movie was fun but really dumb.
* He never thought about Stanley Kubrick being a genius while on set because it would have been too intimidating.
* After the film, he spent some time with Peter Sellers, who was a manic depressive, but says seeing him going into Clouseau mode at a Hollywood dinner for 25 minutes looking for a girl’s earring is one of the best things he’s ever seen.
* He feels he did Trekkies a favor by killing Captain Kirk in Star Trek Generations because it opened the door for J.J. Abrams. He suggests watching Patrick Stewart deliver long monologues is boring.
* At a post Clockwork Hollywood party, he met Gene Kelly who proceeded to blow him off because of the use of Singin In the Rain in the film. Years after his passing, Kelly’s widow told McDowell he wasn’t mad at him, he was mad at Kubrick because Kelly never got paid.
* After spending some time with original author Anthony Burgess, McDowell realized he was obsessed with his own bowel movements.
* Kubrick loved dogs and his house was always full of dog shit. He gave a golden retriever to McDowell, who McDowell named Alex. Kubrick asked why he didn’t name is Stanley?
* Apparently, Kubrick is one of only a few of non-royal people in England to be buried on his own land.
* Two of the most famous scenes from the end of the movie, Alex’s free association with the psychologist and his being fed, both ended up the way they were because of McDowell being bored with what was scripted and wanting to make Kubrick laugh. The association in the film was totally improvised. The popping open his mouth to be fed made Kubrick laugh so hard, he had to go off set.
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Re: It's Kubrickian! SPARTACUS

Postby TheButcher on Mon Aug 13, 2012 7:51 pm

'Spartacus': Kirk Douglas still a political gladiator
Ahead of Monday night's Academy screening, the 95-year-old thesp-producer recalls his battles to make the epic and to break the Blacklist

David S. Cohen wrote:At 95, some 15 years after a stroke left him battling a speech impediment, Kirk Douglas worries about making himself understood.

He has reason to worry -- not because he has difficulty speaking, but because he still has so much to say.

In fact, he speaks more than well enough, and these days he's talking about the making of the 1960 epic "Spartacus," how it helped bring an end to the Hollywood blacklist, and how much today's political landscape echoes those dark times.

"The blacklist period was so divisive in the country, much like the period now," he said. "For example, years ago McCarthy was shouting about communists in the Congress, and right now we have Allan West, a representative from Florida, saying there are communists in Congress. And when you say 'Name them,' he refuses. That's fear-mongering.

"And you have (Michele) Bachmann criticizing the Secretary of State, Hilary Clinton, who I think is doing a very good job, because she has a Muslim assistant, who (Bachmann) thinks is like a terrorist. And that's unsubstantiated.

"So in many ways, when I made 'Spartacus' the climate was similar to the climate we're having now. And what I mean by that is, there are too many Republicans, too many Democrats, and not enough Americans."

Douglas tells more about the blacklist era in his book "I Am Spartacus! Making a Film, Breaking the Blacklist," and will appear onstage in a Q&A ahead of a screening of the picture at the Academy's Goldwyn Theater tonight, part of the Acad's "Last 70mm Film Festival" series.

The screen legend met with Variety in the living room of his Beverly Hills home on Friday. He entered briskly, wearing blue track pants, leather moccasins and a white long-sleeved polo. His hair is white now, his shoulders are slightly stooped, his hands are gnarled and wizened. He doesn't sound like the star audiences remember. But there's no mistaking that face. He's still Kirk Douglas.

"When you get to be 95, first of all you're surprised," he said. "Jesus. With the pacemaker, stroke, new knees, I'm a battered 95. But you start looking back. Looking forward, you know your final destination. So you keep taking inventory of your life. And one of those fascinating parts of my life, to me, was making 'Spartacus.'?"

One of the things that still inflames Douglas is the hypocrisy of those years, when writers and actors with suspected communist ties, or those who refused to name others before Congress, were banned from work in the U.S. movie industry.

"I knew so many people whose lives were ruined. One committed suicide," he said. But he recounts in the book that when he revealed to his agent, Lew Wasserman, that he had hired blacklisted scribe Dalton Trumbo to write "Spartacus" under a pseudonym, Wasserman said, "I know."

In fact, by the time Douglas decided to buck the system and push for Trumbo to get his own name on "Spartacus," it had been an open secret for years that blacklisted writers were working -- but they had to write under pseudonyms, and for greatly reduced fees.

"The studio heads had too much power," said Douglas. "They could have fought people like McCarthy and the others in Washington, but they caved in and they established the blacklist.

"Now they don't have that power, but they have become too much like big business. At least in my day, I think the studio heads tried to make some good pictures, and I think they succeeded in making a lot more good pictures than we make today."

Trumbo, the highest-paid writer in Hollywood before he was consigned to the blacklist, emerges as one of the heroes of Douglas' book, especially in the critical period after helmer Stanley Kubrick screened his first rough cut of "Spartacus."

"Trumbo hated him," said Douglas of the director, "and Kubrick hated Trumbo. Trumbo wrote an 80-page letter to Kubrick, about how Kubrick wanted to make a 'small Spartacus,' and he wanted to make a 'large Spartacus.'?"

Trumbo's view carried the day, and arguably saved the picture.

But Universal didn't entirely embrace the result. The red-baiting years still had the studio brass nervous about releasing anything that seemed to advocate revolution, so large chunks of the movie's politics were neutered.

Part of the drama of getting the movie made were clashes among Universal, Trumbo, Douglas -- who was both star and producer -- and Kubrick, Douglas' hand-picked director.

"I was one of the first to start a production company," he said, "and that changed everything, because it's hard to be the boss and also the star. That's not a good combination. Kubrick certainly didn't like it."

Douglas said that even though the country's political climate is similar today to the bad old days, the climate in Hollywood is different.

"I admire so many of the stars for doing such wonderful things -- George Clooney in Africa, Sean Penn -- and they really give of themselves. And Hollywood is the best ambassador to the world, because they love Hollywood pictures. And when a Hollywood star goes out in the world, he's not a Republican or a Democrat, he's an American."

Douglas rarely watches movies now, including his own. But as part of his research for the book, he watched "Spartacus" again for the first time in 50 years.

What surprised him?

"That it was such a good picture. I took it for granted then, but now I realize that I had such a powerhouse (cast): Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov, Jean Simmons, Tony Curtis played a small part … and Kirk Douglas."

"I think I would cast me again to play that part."
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Re: It's Kubrickian! SPARTACUS

Postby TheButcher on Mon Aug 13, 2012 7:53 pm

The 'Spartacus' duel: UA, Yul Brynner and the rival 'Gladiators'
Stanley Kubrick's classic was almost derailed by a competing project

David S. Cohen wrote:Studios today face off over dueling superheroes and Snow White projects, but in the late 1950s, Kirk Douglas and United Artists were at swords point over competing "Spartacus" projects.

In fact, the Douglas epic directed by Stanley Kubrick nearly didn't get made.

Douglas's production company, Bryna, held the rights to Howard Fast's novel "Spartacus," but United Artists had its own Spartacus project planned, with Yul Brynner to star, and had trademarked several titles, including "The Gladiators" and "Spartacus."

UA upped the ante with a full-page ad in Variety for "The Gladiators" in Feb. 1958. Douglas thought it was a bluff, but in his book "I Am Spartacus!" he recounts telling his agent Lew Wasserman, "That damned Variety ad makes it seem like 'The Gladiators' is in the can. Nobody wants to risk a fight."

Wasserman suggested Douglas try Universal.

Douglas was skeptical that the money-losing studio of "Francis the Talking Mule" would or could make the picture. What he didn't know was that Wasserman and MCA were moving to buy the lot, and eventually the studio.

Within hours, U had called Douglas. It gave him four weeks to deliver a script. When a draft by Fast proved unusable, Douglas needed a scribe who could give the studio a good script in just a fortnight.

He turned to the blacklisted Dalton Trumbo, known as the best and fastest scripter around.

The rest, as they say, is history.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby TheButcher on Sat Feb 09, 2013 10:19 am

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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby TheBaxter on Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:04 am



that ending sucks. it reminds me of the "happy" ending that friedkin added to the exorcist when it was rereleased. kubrick did the right thing by getting rid of it.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Spandau Belly on Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:01 pm



needs Peter Sellers as a bumbling doctor
Last edited by Spandau Belly on Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby so sorry on Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:24 pm

TheBaxter wrote:


that ending sucks. it reminds me of the "happy" ending that friedkin added to the exorcist when it was rereleased. kubrick did the right thing by getting rid of it.



I know there are pictures (maybe video?) of that scene somewhere in this thread (and I'm sure it was the Butcher who posted it). Definetly a case of "Thank God that it got cut".
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Fried Gold on Mon Jun 23, 2014 8:13 pm

I happened upon this 1965 interview with Kubrick again - http://www.openculture.com/2012/06/rare ... rkeri.html - and noticed that he says part of his preparation for movies is to read and learn everything about the movie's subject from top to bottom.

I wonder if this method is why the gaps between his later movies increased so much - in his quest to research a topic, as the topic became more involving, he spent longer researching than actually making the movie.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby so sorry on Tue Jun 24, 2014 8:38 am

Fried Gold wrote:I happened upon this 1965 interview with Kubrick again - http://www.openculture.com/2012/06/rare ... rkeri.html - and noticed that he says part of his preparation for movies is to read and learn everything about the movie's subject from top to bottom.

I wonder if this method is why the gaps between his later movies increased so much - in his quest to research a topic, as the topic became more involving, he spent longer researching than actually making the movie.



Must have been interesting when he was "researching" for Eyes Wide Shut.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Spandau Belly on Tue Jun 24, 2014 8:52 am

I'm willing to believe that he became less productive because he got so into reading about subjects of interest. I think he also had a lot of projects that just didn't pan out. Either because he couldn't get the funding, or because he wasn't confident enough in the project and decided to scrap it. Most famously, he spent a huge amount of time and effort researching a Napoleon Bonaparte biopic that never got made.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Fried Gold on Tue Jun 24, 2014 10:24 am

so sorry wrote:Must have been interesting when he was "researching" for Eyes Wide Shut.


Spandau Belly wrote:I'm willing to believe that he became less productive because he got so into reading about subjects of interest. I think he also had a lot of projects that just didn't pan out. Either because he couldn't get the funding, or because he wasn't confident enough in the project and decided to scrap it. Most famously, he spent a huge amount of time and effort researching a Napoleon Bonaparte biopic that never got made.

For Napoleon, I think the studio pulled the plug

If you get a chance to watch "Stanley Kubrick's Boxes", it touches on some of these points.

He would spend so long researching, that others had research, produced and released a movie in the same time. With Napoleon, another Napoleonic film had been made, released and tanked in the time it'd taken Kubrick to get to pre-production. The studio then pulled the plug. And with Wartime Lies, he researched the Holocaust in so much detail that a) Spielberg had made Schindler's List by then and b) the subject matter had gotten him too depressed to want to continue.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Spandau Belly on Tue Jun 24, 2014 10:40 am

I'd heard that with his Napoleon movie he was really arrogant in dealing with the studio. He didn't really want them in on his creative process, he wouldn't or couldn't articulate what his vision for the material was and so they concluded that he couldn't synthesize his research into a cohesive narrative. He just expected them to give him buckets of money and let him go off and make some really expensive movie that would have something to do with Napoleon and they weren't down with that.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Spandau Belly on Thu Sep 04, 2014 8:51 am

I finally got around to seeing PATHS OF GLORY and I quite liked it. You can definitely feel Kubrick growing on the job in this one. Some sequences exhibit that signature Kubrick tightness, whereas others feel like they could've been directed by any competant director of the day.

The story does a really good job at exploring its themes of disillusionment and corruption. Although it is set among the ranks of the French army, the mostly American cast never feel like Frenchmen. Even when they aren't mispronouncing each others and their own names, they just feel like Americans. Kirk Douglas is still plenty watchable and gives a good performance, even if he never does feel like a Frenchman.

I also went into this one not knowing much about it. I think I expected more of a battlefield movie, which I usually don't find as engaging, so it caught me off guard that it was more about internal military politics. An excellent film.

I am at 99% Kubrick now. I've only got KILLER'S KISS and FEAR & DESIRE left, and FEAR & DESIRE doesn't count. So one more to go.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby so sorry on Thu Sep 04, 2014 8:54 am

Spandau Belly wrote:I finally got around to seeing PATHS OF GLORY and I quite liked it. You can definitely feel Kubrick growing on the job in this one. Some sequences exhibit that signature Kubrick tightness, whereas others feel like they could've been directed by any competant director of the day.

The story does a really good job at exploring its themes of disillusionment and corruption. Although it is set among the ranks of the French army, the mostly American cast never feel like Frenchmen. Even when they aren't mispronouncing each others and their own names, they just feel like Americans. Kirk Douglas is still plenty watchable and gives a good performance, even if he never does feel like a Frenchman.

I also went into this one not knowing much about it. I think I expected more of a battlefield movie, which I usually don't find as engaging, so it caught me off guard that it was more about internal military politics. An excellent film.

I am at 99% Kubrick now. I've only got KILLER'S KISS and FEAR & DESIRE left, and FEAR & DESIRE doesn't count. So one more to go.



I bought the Criterion BluRay about a year ago, and totally forgot that it has been sitting on my shelf. Gonna try and pull it out soon and watch it.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Ribbons on Thu Sep 04, 2014 12:01 pm

Fun fact, David Simon credits Paths of Glory as one of the the two primary influences on The Wire (the other one being Greek tragedy).
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby Spandau Belly on Thu Sep 04, 2014 9:53 pm

I do plan on catching up on tv shows when I am old and retired. THE WIRE is one of the ones on my list. If The Zone is still around then, I will come back and discuss.
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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 10, 2015 2:47 am

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Re: Kubrickian Classics

Postby TheButcher on Thu Mar 16, 2017 6:50 am

The Shining — Quietly Going Insane Together
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Re: Kubrickian Classics: ‘The Shining’

Postby TheButcher on Thu Mar 30, 2017 2:22 pm

TheBaxter wrote:


that ending sucks. it reminds me of the "happy" ending that friedkin added to the exorcist when it was rereleased. kubrick did the right thing by getting rid of it.

BD Mar 30, 2017:
Producer and Writer Reveal Various Original Endings to Kubrick’s ‘The Shining’
John Squires wrote:Stephen King has made no secret of the fact that he’s not a fan of Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of The Shining, mostly because it deviated a bit too much from his novel; the 1997 miniseries is more faithful, and was essentially made in direct response to King’s disapproval of the Kubrick film. Regardless, most agree that The Shining 1980 is one of the best horror films of all time.

One of the big changes Kubrick made was in regards to the ending. In King’s novel, the Overlook Hotel burns to the ground with Jack Torrance inside of it; Wendy, Danny, and Dick Hallorann manage to escape with their lives. In the 1980 film, Jack of course kills Dick Hallorann and eventually freezes to death outside. As for the Overlook Hotel, it never burns to the ground.

But that wasn’t always the ending that Kubrick had in mind.

In a new chat with Entertainment Weekly, co-writer Diane Johnson and producer Jan Harlan provided some insights into alternate endings that were conceived as part of the writing process. One idea was to have Wendy kill Jack, while another draft had Jack killing young Danny.

Johnson explained why Kubrick changed King’s ending:
The ending was changed almost entirely because Kubrick found it a cliche to just blow everything up. He thought there might be something else that would be metaphorically and visually more interesting. In the book, nobody gets killed except Jack. And Kubrick really thought somebody should get killed — because it was a horror movie. So we weighed the dramatic possibilities of killing off various characters and did different treatments. We actually talked it over in detail the possibility of having different people getting killed.

Danny’s relationship with his father was the thing that most interested Kubrick. He was emotionally involved with the point of view of a little boy who is afraid of his father. I remember Kubrick saying that visually he could imagine a small yellow chalk outline on the floor like that they put around the bodies of victims. And Kubrick liked that image. But he was too tender-hearted for that ending and thought it would be too terrible to do.


She also noted that the idea was tossed around at one point to have Hallorann live but become possessed by the evil powers of the Overlook Hotel, turning him into a “surrogate for Jack.”

Johnson and Harlan also dug into the infamous hospital scene that Kubrick had destroyed, as well as the many (wacky) fan theories that have sprung up over the years. So be sure to read the full interview over on EW if you can’t get enough of The Shining. You’re not alone.


EW MARCH 30, 2017:
The Shining producer explains ending changes
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