THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Which director made the best films, made the best visuals, or smelled the best? This is the forum to find out.

What's Your Favorite DePalma Film?

Sisters (1973)
0
No votes
Phantom Of The Paradise (1974)
2
3%
Carrie (1976)
5
8%
The Fury (1978)
0
No votes
Dressed To Kill (1980)
6
10%
Blow Out (1981)
8
14%
Scarface (1983)
16
27%
Body Double (1984)
4
7%
The Untouchables (1987)
10
17%
Casulaties of War (1989)
2
3%
Raising Cain (1992)
1
2%
Carlitos Way (1993)
3
5%
Mission Impossible (1996)
2
3%
Femme Fatale (2003)
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 59

THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Aug 02, 2005 3:42 pm

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Brian DePalma has always been a very controversial director.

Since his earliest films, the late 60s hippie-style comedies Hi Mom! Greetings and The Wedding Party, DePalma has been exploring the different languages of cinema and in turn pissing people off with his ideas. What most of his detractors dont usually admit is that DePalma is a one of a kind master of visual storytelling. Give him a script and he will turn it into a beautiful work of film regardless of how bad the actual story is.

In 1973, DePalma created his first official thriller "Sisters". This film was a conscious attempt to work in the style of DePalma's favorite thriller directors Alfred Hitchcock and Roman Polanski. Sisters had obvious nods to films like Psycho, Rear Window and Rope.

In 1974, DePalma's horror rock comedy Phantom of the Paradise was released. This was quite a big departure from DePalma's earlier works. He took his visual style to a new level and his unique dark humor was even more prevalent in this film. Years later, it has become a major cult classic.

In 1976, DePalma made Carrie , based on the novel by Stephen King. This was DePalmas first real all around masterpiece. All of his own ideas mixed with Lawrence Cohen's script came together to make one of the classics of 70s horror cinema right up there along side Spielberg's Jaws.

Throughout the rest of the 1970s DePalma worked on another thriller Obsession (1977), a sci fi-horror thriller called The Fury (1978) and Home Movies (1979) a very personal film that DePalma made with students from Sarah Lawrence College.

In 1980, DePalmas psychological thriller Dressed To Kill was released and it became the subject of critical controversy. DePalma was accused of being a misogynist among other things. This is when DePalma experienced his first real comparison to Hitchcock because of the storyline in DTK. It was obviously an updated version of Hitch's Psycho. Many saw DePalma as merely ripping off Hitch with DTK, others saw him as a post modern auteur working in one of his favorite directors style, but bringing his own ideas and wit to the game. DePalma made one thing absolutely clear, he was a master at visual storytelling and fluid camera tricks. From his use of split screen to his extended tracking shots, DePalma was designing his own persona as a director and staying true to keeping cinema a visual art.

The 1980s was a great decade for DePalma, he made such classics as the masterful conspiracy thriller Blow Out (1981), the crime cult classic Scarface (1983), the LA based psycho-thriller Body Double (1984), a crime-comedy Wise Guys (1986), the David Mamet scripted crime/gangster masterpiece The Untouchables (1987) and the visceral, devastating Vietnam War film Casualities of War (1989) which was based on true events.

The 1990s brought: the flop Bonfire of The Vanities (1990), the experimental thriller Raising Cain (1992), another crime masterpiece Carlitos Way (1993), the action-adventure masterpiece Mission Impossible (1996), the conspiracy thriller Snake Eyes (1997), the sci fi adventure Mission To Mars (1999) and the dream based thriller Femme Fatale (2003).

In 2005, DePalma is currently working on The Black Dahlia, a thriller (based on the book by James Ellroy) about real murders that took place in LA in the 1930s. I cant wait to see this film!

DePalma has had a huge impact on all kinds of directors including his good friends The Movie Brats: George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese.
More modern directors such as Quentin Tarantino and David Fincher among others have also stated how much DePalma has inspired and influenced their own works.

While some will always see DePalma as merely a "Hitchcock rip off", there are those of us who can see that DePalma is an inspiring original artist and probably one of the last of his kind in Hollywood.

I can honestly say that hes one of my all time favorite filmmakers and I've enjoyed so many of his films over the years since becoming a "movie geek". I get excited when I watch his movies and I really lose myself in them.

Heres the place for you to discuss and show your love for the films of BrIan DePalma.
Last edited by WinslowLeach on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:47 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby burlivesleftnut on Tue Aug 02, 2005 3:44 pm

I would have chosen Blow Out, but the ending is a bummer. Instead I chose the highly underrated Casualties of War.
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Postby John-Locke on Tue Aug 02, 2005 3:51 pm

What no Snake Eyes?, I voted for Scarface although I credit a lot of it to Stones Script, Honestly I haven't seen enough of his films to call myself an expert but I do dig his style, it's just that sometimes thats all you get, no substance.
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Postby thomasgaffney on Tue Aug 02, 2005 3:59 pm

I can't say that I saw every movie on the list. But I have seen almost all of them from Blow Out on (except Raising Cain). From those movies, I have to give props to The Untouchables. Fantastic movie that I could watch over and over again without getting tired of it.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Aug 02, 2005 4:00 pm

John, no I left out Snake Eyes. I wanted to really boil it down to his best films. I dont really think Snake Eyes qualifies. DePalma can get overly flashy at times, but I think thats just because the scripts are lacking in his eyes so he tries to keep it about visuals. Id actually rather watch some cool visual flashiness than just have the camera sit in one spot. As DePalma has said: most directors nowadays use the camera strictly as a recording device, so they arent really going all the way with the medium of cinema.

Oliver Stone stated in an interview that DePalma pretty much co wrote Scarface with him, but he wasnt credited.
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Postby John-Locke on Tue Aug 02, 2005 4:09 pm

I stand corrected, Thanks Winslow.

I was joking about Snake Eyes, I've never met anybody who really liked it. Femme Fatale was okay though.
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Postby bluebottle on Tue Aug 02, 2005 4:15 pm

Great topic Winslow!

I have a love hate relationship with his films, and it's for the reasons you stated.

His occasional "borrowing" of Hitchcockian styles/themes/shots have always bothered me.

The most obvious is in Raising Cain (which is a terrible movie, but extremely entertaining if you're in the mood for a crazy John Lithgow, and really who isn't in the mood?) with the shot of putting the car in the swamp... It's exactly the shot from Psycho.

There's nothing wrong with paying tribute to a director, but he crosses that fine line and it feels like he's just flat out stealing.

Mind you, I loved Blow Out, Carrie, Untouchables... With a good script, he will make a fantastic film.

Maybe that's the problem for me. When he's got a shaky script, he doesn't have enough faith in himself as a director and resorts to "borrowing" shots.

If you haven't seen Hi Mom! I highly recommend it, for the "Be Black Baby" segment.

Controversial director indeed. Again, great topic.
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Postby so sorry on Tue Aug 02, 2005 4:23 pm

untouchables was great, scarface is fun but really overblown and silly. was causualties of war the Alex P Keaton movie? Man, that was bad!
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Postby TonyWilson on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:14 pm

Casualties of War is fricking great!!!!!
I'm going with Carrie though, bit of an obvious one but I still love it, the end, although diferent from the book, is far better and that split screen stuff works fantastically well.

As for Scarface that film isn't really overblown. Ok guys quit laughing for a second. The film was a perfect match for the script and that hole early 80's vibe. It certainly wasn't silly it was pretty fucking intense and makes a great statment about corruption. Perfect cinematography too.
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Postby so sorry on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:17 pm

C'mon Tony! Scarface WAS sillly, but i don't mean it as a slam. The accent, the jamacian assassins, the three dozen bullets it takes to take Tony down, the mountain of coke... all brilliantly silly... tis a great movie, but I just can;'t take it seriously.
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Postby TonyWilson on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:21 pm

Ah, I don't know, I never thought it was silly.
I mean crazy, audacious, gaudy, violent, intense. But not silly.
I was taking it seriously, like a big adrenaline rush.
Hehe yeh the 3 dozen bullets was a bit unbelievable but he was on coke and crazy and If you want to get serious it makes a good metaphor for his entire fall.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:25 pm

Bluebottle wrote:Great topic Winslow!

I have a love hate relationship with his films, and it's for the reasons you stated.

His occasional "borrowing" of Hitchcockian styles/themes/shots have always bothered me.

The most obvious is in Raising Cain (which is a terrible movie, but extremely entertaining if you're in the mood for a crazy John Lithgow, and really who isn't in the mood?) with the shot of putting the car in the swamp... It's exactly the shot from Psycho.

There's nothing wrong with paying tribute to a director, but he crosses that fine line and it feels like he's just flat out stealing.

Mind you, I loved Blow Out, Carrie, Untouchables... With a good script, he will make a fantastic film.

Maybe that's the problem for me. When he's got a shaky script, he doesn't have enough faith in himself as a director and resorts to "borrowing" shots.

If you haven't seen Hi Mom! I highly recommend it, for the "Be Black Baby" segment.

Controversial director indeed. Again, great topic.


Thanks for your reply Bluebottle. I think thats the thing about DePalma. Some can overlook the Hitchcock stuff and just get a kick out of it (like me). Others get very angry and consider it plagiarism. Yet, in film many directors steal shots from other movies, but they arent labeled rip off artists at all. I think DePalma puts the obvious stuff right out front, so instead of it being secret, its there for everyone to see. I dont know. As long as you can see the films for what they are, thats the most important thing.

So Sorry: i gotta strongly disagree with you about COW. That film is a masterpiece.

Scarface: I always saw it as sort of a modern take on Treasure of the Sierra Madre (which is shown in the film). Its like this crazy paranoid film of what getting everything you want does to some people. In this case, its Tony Montana, a thug who self destructs and destroys everything around him. Its a totally nihilistic black comedy.
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Postby so sorry on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:26 pm

I guess I find it hard to take a movie seriously when it is held in such high esteem amongst the rap/gangsta community. If you have the latest DVD, it has a featurette of rappers 'discussing' the relevance of Scarface in their lives. silly silly silly.
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Postby TonyWilson on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:30 pm

Yeh the rapper's thing is very daft, although I do walk with a certain swagger just after I watche the film. It's fun to watch before a lads night out.
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Postby so sorry on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:31 pm

winslow, maybe i'm thinking of a different movie (casualties of war, that is). The one with Sean Penn and Michael Jay Fox? Man, i'm not a Penn fan really, but his 'performance' in that movie was, well, how do you say 'way over the top' in french? Le Shit! and about Scarface, i got the 'subtext' of the movie, i got it bashed over my head!
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Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:37 pm

So Sorry: Yeah, COW is with Penn and Michael J Fox. I didnt find Penn's performance over the top at all. I think its one of his best roles/ performances same with Michael J Fox, John C Reilly, John Leguizamo. I honestly think that film is one of DePalmas best. Its also an excellent Vietnam War film. Its tough to watch in parts, but man is it great filmmaking. The music by Ennio Morricone is also incredible.
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Postby so sorry on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:45 pm

I respectfully agree to disagree with you good sir. now over to the Evil Fucking Bastard thread where i'll tear you a new asshole! I'm kidding, of course... I don't like touching assholes.
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Postby John-Locke on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:49 pm

That Rappers thing on the Scarface DVD is hilarious, I seriously doubt any of them have actually understood the film in any way, instead it's all like "Yeah Man, Tony he's like a role model man, people in the Hood, they see what Tony got and they're like, Yeah thats what I'm going to do, it worked fine for Tony"
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Postby so sorry on Tue Aug 02, 2005 5:51 pm

i thik that's the unintentional beauty of that featurette. they think they are being taken seriously, yet the exact opposite is true. fucking nimrods...
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Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Tue Aug 02, 2005 6:14 pm

so sorry wrote:I guess I find it hard to take a movie seriously when it is held in such high esteem amongst the rap/gangsta community. If you have the latest DVD, it has a featurette of rappers 'discussing' the relevance of Scarface in their lives. silly silly silly.


Thanks boys, I don't need my energy drink to fire me up today.

A number of rappers single out Tony Montana as a role model for his transition from poverty to wealth and outsider status.

Scarface is distributed by a subsiduary of the same parent corporation that ultimately controls most of the biggest names in hip-hop. So, many of today's hiphop artists' lives, real and imagined, can be seen to mirror Tony's. Not so much in the superficial trapping of success that their masters might allow them, but in how they too are pawns, just as Tony was in the plans of other men. This is Scarface and hip-hop's ultimate irony
.
WIKIPEDIA

What's wrong with people using "Scarface" as an influence? Why is it silly? Tony is an outsider, who takes things into his own hands to escape from poverty. What other way could someone with Tony's place in society make such a meteoric rise to the money and power that Tony eventually reached?

The story is essentially the American Dream on crack (well, coke at the time). You try growing up with nothing, perceiving that society is out to get you, and tell me you couldn't relate to Tony. It is very interesting to compare the "American dream" to a gangster Cuban immigrant, hustling his way on the streets of Miami, to become a kingpin in the drug game; however, that is what Scarface does. For those reasons, the movie has been an inspiration, in that it instills hope to those who feel hopeless.

Plus, what, none of you listened to "The Geto Boys" when they were younger? "Gangsta" rappers glommed onto the story of Tony and through their lyrics essentially did the same thing as the film...created a persona, an alter-ego, created characters much akin to Tony and his world.
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Postby TonyWilson on Tue Aug 02, 2005 6:19 pm

Hey keepcool, that is true I think. I mean Stone wrote the screenplay so there is obviously a big comment on America and the American dream.
Personally I like gangsta rappers, but I can tell for the most part it's a persona or character to sell records. I haven't watched the fetaure myself only heard about it. But if they talk about how they are influenced by his outsider status and how crime is one of the very few options availbale then yeh I can see why. The posturing sometimes annoys me, but I'm english, we live to take the piss out of big headedness.
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Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Tue Aug 02, 2005 6:37 pm

It's not even really the documentary I'm talking about. In printed interviews, there are many "rappers" who wax philosophic about the influence that Tony had on them. And how they used Tony as an influence in some of the more lurid characters that they created. If you look at all the crap that alot of these "gangsta" rappers had to take vis a vis their lyrics, they would often bring up "Scarface". The argument was that much like the film, they were creating character and personas to tell a story.

How people interpret the intricacies of form and theme in movies is a crucial question in contemporary film culture. Scarface’s re-release raises the issue of how certain movies appease particular cultural groups simply in the way it offers a key to the changed morality of the past few decades–an insight you won’t get from any of the award-winning pictures of that same period." White concludes that "Scarface is one of the best examples in film history of moviegoers making culture for themselves."

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Postby WinslowLeach on Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:50 pm

Heres a few cool DePalma related sites to check out if you wanna know more about his movies, news, history etc.

http://www.briandepalma.net

http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/03/de_palma.html

http://www.angelfire.com/de/palma

http://www.24liesasecond.com
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Postby John-Locke on Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:52 pm

Fuck I had no idea he Directed Wise Guys, he's just gone down a notch in my estimations for that one.
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Postby burlivesleftnut on Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:53 pm

What's Wise Guys?
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Postby John-Locke on Wed Aug 03, 2005 2:06 pm

A Mafia Comedy Starring De Vito and Joe Piscopo, It's truly terrible, I caught it on TCM a few years ago, It actually starts off okay but quickly turns to a complete trainwreck of a movie, IMDB Page is here
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Postby burlivesleftnut on Wed Aug 03, 2005 2:12 pm

Oh crap... I remember. Blech.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Wed Aug 03, 2005 2:15 pm

Well, hes made plenty of other great films. A couple of bad choices isnt anything to get excited about.
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Postby TheBaxter on Thu Aug 04, 2005 11:57 pm

I make no claims whatsoever that it's the best DePalma movie, but I have incredibly fond nostalgic memories of Body Double. Probably because it aired non-stop on HBO one summer when I was in middle school, and provided an endless source of inspiration for my late-night wanking sessions.
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Postby wonkabar on Fri Aug 05, 2005 1:22 am

I had to go with Blow Out. I'm so over Scarface. It's like all the dumbasses in the world now thinks it's "cool" to like that movie. It was never really that great, just cheeseball shit that was fun to quote every now and then. You know something is played out when you can buy the T-shirt at Wall-Mart.
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Postby kookook on Tue Aug 16, 2005 3:27 am

A Great Gangster Action Thriller. - 100%
This film has to be one of the greatest gangster movies ever made.
It's set in 1920's Chicago where Prohibition is enforced throughout the state. Local gangster AL CAPONE (played greatly by Robert De Niro) is shipping alcohol in and selling it to various people. Treasury officer ELIOT NESS (again play greatly by Kevin Costner) is trying to bring a halt to the gangster, so he enlists the help of a Local Policeman (played by Sean Connery) to bring the gangster down.
The film contains a lot of memorable scenes (CAPONE going crazy with a baseball bat at the diner table is excellent) and a lot of graphically violent shoot outs and fights and an excellent finale.
This film is a very good gangster film and is rated (15) for VERY GRAPHIC and BLOODY VIOLENCE and VERY STRONG LANGUAGE.
A Great film for anyone who likes this kind of movie.
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Postby Brocktune on Tue Aug 16, 2005 4:29 am

Carlitos Way. ok, all of these dipshit rappers feel so strongly about scarface, but i ask you, what kind of role model is that. Yeah, i want to build up this massive criminal empire, only to see it and myself destroyed, because im too much of a worthless two bit street thug to not let the money, power and blow go to my head. See, Carlito is Scarface, but this Scarface got smart before he killed himself. Carlito is a much more positive criminal role model. Thats who I wan to be. besides, Sean Penn's hair in Carlitos Way is top fucking notch!
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Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:31 am

I would think these "dipshit" rappers relate to the CHARACTER of Tony Montana. Specifically a character who started out with nothing and who would do anything he could to be a "somebody". And then use the moral message of the film; to not let the money, power, and blow (i.e. the capitalist system that you were trying so hard to "make" it in the first place) "go to your head".

And plus, like many others, these "dipshit" rappers thought that "Scarface" was simply a bad ass flick.
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Postby John-Locke on Tue Aug 16, 2005 7:35 am

Yeah but keepcool a lot of the Dipshit rappers do get the wrong message, they think Tony is a badass role model because he never broke his word or his balls for anybody. They see his fåte as the same as theirs, an inescapable early death which is better embraced than trying to change their path.
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Postby burlivesleftnut on Tue Aug 16, 2005 7:44 am

I am a dipshit wrapper AND a drug kingpin. And you're both wrong.
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Postby Pacino86845 on Tue Aug 16, 2005 7:54 am

I think, with respect to the rappers commenting on Scarface, that they see the film as a modern Shakespearian tragedy, except with Cubans, drugs and chainsaws. Wasn't it Tupac Shakur who started the Scarface references? Tupac was known as a real street poet in his time. As a thespian, he liked to act out scenes of Shakespeare's plays in front of his cronies. I think there's even a video of him doing so. In any case, the thing with Scarface is that Tony Montana is a driven character, to say the least. Simply put, his own determination, blinding him to many realities surrounding him, was what finally got him killed.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:02 am

I think thats the video where Tupac reenacts the scene where Tony and Manny goto kill Frank Lopez. But in the video, Tupac has his boy shoot "Piggy" and "Buffy".

I gotta agree with Brocktune that Carlitos Way is a great film/character study about a gangster whos trying to do the right thing, but keeps getting sucked back into the game. I think its one of DePalmas very best films too.
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Postby John-Locke on Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:00 am

I said no such thing Winslow although I will take credit because I agree with Brocktunes sentiments.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:14 am

Oops! I thought I was looking at your post, not Brocktunes. I edited the last post I made, so its all set now. Sorry bout that ol chap!
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Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Wed Aug 17, 2005 3:08 am

John-Locke wrote:Yeah but keepcool a lot of the Dipshit rappers do get the wrong message, they think Tony is a badass role model because he never broke his word or his balls for anybody. They see his fåte as the same as theirs, an inescapable early death which is better embraced than trying to change their path.


No offense JL, but since you don't listen or know a lot about music, how would you know? I don't mean to come off like an ass-scarf, but I've had this debate many times, so it sorta infuriates me to have to go through it all again.

From Wiki...
A number of rappers single out Tony Montana as a role model for his transition from poverty to wealth and outsider status.


Who owns the record labels?

So, many of today's hiphop artists' lives, real and imagined, can be seen to mirror Tony's. Not so much in the superficial trapping of success that their masters might allow them, but in how they too are pawns, just as Tony was in the plans of other men. This is Scarface and hip-hop's ultimate irony.




What mostly gets me is that most people don't see how these "gangster" rappers might be, in the use of "Scarface" samples, being ironic or satiric. And to me that smacks of simple racism, or to paraphrase Octaveon, listening with "ears wide shut". In other words, there may be more going on than the simple narrative of the song.

I'm not a hip-hop historian or anything, but I think the first use of "Scarface" sampling was from the Geto Boys self titled album circa 1990. And if your into a violent, misogynistic, FANTASY, comedy of epic proportions, give it a listen. (Plus, I was 16 when it came out and it was the most bad-ass shit in hip-hop at the time)
Personally, I'm an atheist in the voting booth and a theist in the movie theatre. I separate the morality of religion with the spirituality and solace of it. There is something boring about atheism.
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Postby evergreen on Wed Aug 17, 2005 3:43 am

Wow, this is a coincidence! I watched Carlito's Way last night, and was reminded of just what a fantastic film it is - every performance in that film is top notch, and I especially like Jon Leguizamo's Benny Blanco from the Bronx.

Scarface is great, but Carlito's is kind of a epilogue to Scarface in the way that Unforgiven is a epilogue to some of Clint's spaghetti westerns. Great movie.

And I'm not really interested in debating the intentions of Gangsta rappers, but I think it's fairly well established that many young black men in America have a tendency towards self-destruction; a well known black professor from Harvard pointed out that even guys who are in fairly good home situations can sometimes be seduced by the myth that things will never work out for them and turn to crime as a result.

I would have thought a place with as much black crime as America should probably take a bit more responsibility for the welfare of their own population. Sure, it might be true that a couple of dipshit rappers were inspired by the Scarface story in a way that led to them improving their situations, but I'd say for every one of them, there are 50 guys who got totally the wrong message from the movie, and that will be partly the fault of the dipshit rappers who glamourise the character of Tony Montana.
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Postby John-Locke on Wed Aug 17, 2005 7:28 am

keepcoolbutcare wrote:
John-Locke wrote:Yeah but keepcool a lot of the Dipshit rappers do get the wrong message, they think Tony is a badass role model because he never broke his word or his balls for anybody. They see his fåte as the same as theirs, an inescapable early death which is better embraced than trying to change their path.


No offense JL, but since you don't listen or know a lot about music, how would you know? I don't mean to come off like an ass-scarf, but I've had this debate many times, so it sorta infuriates me to have to go through it all again.

From Wiki...
A number of rappers single out Tony Montana as a role model for his transition from poverty to wealth and outsider status.



Who owns the record labels?

So, many of today's hiphop artists' lives, real and imagined, can be seen to mirror Tony's. Not so much in the superficial trapping of success that their masters might allow them, but in how they too are pawns, just as Tony was in the plans of other men. This is Scarface and hip-hop's ultimate irony.




What mostly gets me is that most people don't see how these "gangster" rappers might be, in the use of "Scarface" samples, being ironic or satiric. And to me that smacks of simple racism, or to paraphrase Octaveon, listening with "ears wide shut". In other words, there may be more going on than the simple narrative of the song.

I'm not a hip-hop historian or anything, but I think the first use of "Scarface" sampling was from the Geto Boys self titled album circa 1990. And if your into a violent, misogynistic, FANTASY, comedy of epic proportions, give it a listen. (Plus, I was 16 when it came out and it was the most bad-ass shit in hip-hop at the time)



Here we go again, I do listen and like music, I just don’t like to talk about it much, Rap music is something I have been listening to since NWA came out, I think I know enough about Rap to know that some of them get the wrong end of the stick when it comes to Scarface, of course many Rappers are savvy poets with a keen ear for irony.

Have you seen the Def Jam Scarface doc on the DVD, some of those guys clearly don't get the point, others clearly do but the way they go about representing their beliefs could easily be misinterpreted by the kids these guys are meant to be role models to, and usually is.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Wed Aug 17, 2005 10:11 am

This discussion reminded me of a movie that may have sparked off the whole "Rappers Who Love Scarface" thing.

If you get a chance, watch the film New Jack City. In the film, Nino Brown (Wesley Snipes) is this big drug kingpin in Harlem. In one of the scenes he is screening Scarface in his mansion. Then afterwards, he begins to imitate Tony Montana. This film was a big hit with the rappers back in the day.

Also you may see another clip from a movie after he shows Scarface. You can see a man lying in the sand. That is a shot from Sweet Sweetbacks Baadasss Song. Mario Van Peebles who directed New Jack City is the son of Melvin Van Peebles as most of you probably know. The director/star of Sweetback.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Sep 06, 2005 10:20 am

I was just reading about the new DVD release of Wise Guys and I remembered everyone saying how bad they thought it was. Heres some news on the DVD and an exerpt of Roger Ebert's review of the film when it was released:

DE PALMA FILM GETS WISE

NEW DVD RESTORES KEY SPRINGSTEEN SONG

Brian De Palma's Wise Guys was released earlier this week for the first time on DVD. When the film was first released on VHS in the late 1980s, a Bruce Springsteen song ("Pink Cadillac") which provided a key transition in the film was omitted due to liscensing problems. That song cues a punchline in the film as the main protagonists, Harry and Moe (played by Danny DeVito and Joe Piscopo) race toward Atlantic City in a stolen Cadillac which they treat with total anarchic abandonment. I am pleased to report that Warner Bros.'s new DVD has restored the Springsteen song in all its comedic glory, and that watching the film on video now provides a much more complete experience of this De Palma gem from 1986. The Chicago Sun-Times has highlighted Roger Ebert's original review of the film upon its DVD release this week. In 1986, Ebert wrote of the film:

""Wise Guys" is an abundant movie, filled with ideas and gags and great characters. It never runs dry. It never has the desperation of so many gangster comedies, which seem to be marching over the same tired ground. This movie was made with joy, and you can feel it in the sense of all the actors working at the top of their form."

(from DePalma Ala Mod)
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Postby John-Locke on Tue Sep 06, 2005 11:12 am

Yeah but it's Joe Piscopo, need I say more.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Tue Sep 06, 2005 11:19 am

Im actually not a fan of Joe Piscopo either, but Im definitely going to get this new DVD and give the film another viewing. I havent seen it in years.
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Postby DennisMM on Sat Sep 10, 2005 12:01 am

I'd have to go with "Blow Out." I love "The Untouchables," "Carrie" is great; hell, "The Fury" has its moments. But the last 30 seconds of "Blow Out" chill me to the bone.

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Postby WinslowLeach on Sat Sep 10, 2005 8:40 am

Blow Out is a total masterpiece to me. Theres so many great sequences in it, from the false opening slasher movie to the actual Blow Out sequence to the exciting tragic climax. I love how DePalma utilizes the deep focus shots (ex: the bridge w/ the Owl and Frog), split screen, those great tracking shots. One of my favorites is the sequence where Burke kills that woman he thinks is Sally, and the camera dollies up and over that fence and we follow Sally walking down the street.

Another thing I love about it is, if you sit down and watch Blow Out, its like a lesson in how to direct a film.

"Brian DePalma's Blow Out: Now You Hear It...Now You Don't"
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Postby LaDracul on Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:19 pm

I liked "Carrie" because I could sympathize. Even though it never came to some a-holes covering me in pigs' blood, thank God.

However, I'm amazed at how the hip hop community has picked up on "Scarface". That, and Gwen Stefani basing her look on Elvira on the cover of "The Sweet Escape"-
ImageImage

I'm actually waiting to see how long it'll take the emo community to pick up on POTP. Of course, with Fox planning a remake (I know, I know), it won't be too far off... But it seems the Jp. embraced it as they made a Medicom Real Action Hero of Phantom...could it be because he looked like a member of "Gatchaman"/"Battle of the Planets"?

http://www.adufilms.com/fotos/comando-g.jpg

Meh, prolly just a coincidence.
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Postby Nachokoolaid on Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:50 pm

so sorry wrote:I guess I find it hard to take a movie seriously when it is held in such high esteem amongst the rap/gangsta community. If you have the latest DVD, it has a featurette of rappers 'discussing' the relevance of Scarface in their lives. silly silly silly.


Yeah, this very thing almost kept me from choosing it, but in the end, I like it better than all those others listed.

And props to his Mission Impossible film, which probably won't get much love. I think it's the best of the three.
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