THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Which director made the best films, made the best visuals, or smelled the best? This is the forum to find out.

What's Your Favorite DePalma Film?

Sisters (1973)
0
No votes
Phantom Of The Paradise (1974)
2
3%
Carrie (1976)
5
8%
The Fury (1978)
0
No votes
Dressed To Kill (1980)
6
10%
Blow Out (1981)
8
14%
Scarface (1983)
16
27%
Body Double (1984)
4
7%
The Untouchables (1987)
10
17%
Casulaties of War (1989)
2
3%
Raising Cain (1992)
1
2%
Carlitos Way (1993)
3
5%
Mission Impossible (1996)
2
3%
Femme Fatale (2003)
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 59

Postby Nachokoolaid on Sun Apr 08, 2007 12:04 am

evergreen wrote:I'm not really interested in debating the intentions of Gangsta rappers, but I think it's fairly well established that many young black men in America have a tendency towards self-destruction; a well known black professor from Harvard pointed out that even guys who are in fairly good home situations can sometimes be seduced by the myth that things will never work out for them and turn to crime as a result.


A tendency? Yeah, I'd say so. I teach school in an area with a high African American population, and I hear 4-5 times a day that "I'm just gonna fail anyway, so fuck it." Or... "I'm gonna end up on th streets anyway, so I'll just let it happen." Or "You're trying to fail me." (after they refuse to do work because they "know they're going to fail anyway." The definition of fatalism.

Yeah, it's a real life problem. I had a student (2 days ago) lay down a roll of 100 dollar bills on my desk worth $6000 and tell me I could have it if I'd pass him for the rest of the year. He acted like it was no biggie, and I know he doesn't have a job. Sad, because he's already living that lifestyle. And how can I convince him otherwise, when it takes me 3 months to make what he did in a few days?
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Postby Seppuku on Sun Apr 08, 2007 1:58 am

Well, to dredge up that rappers feature argument again, the one thing that tips it into looking like it might have been a satire is when a few of them start saying how Tony Montana was justified gatting his sister...because she was with his buddy. If they WERE being serious, however, then hot damn, that is pretty much as ALF as it gets!
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Postby WinslowLeach on Sun Apr 08, 2007 8:34 am

This is a post from the good ol days! Totally forgot about this one. :)
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Postby burlivesleftnut on Sun Apr 08, 2007 2:06 pm

Brian DePalma is teh hot. You would have to be a total nobody to NOT get how cool DePalma is.
Last edited by burlivesleftnut on Sun Apr 08, 2007 2:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Retardo_Montalban on Sun Apr 08, 2007 2:15 pm

burlivesleftnut wrote:Brian DePalma is teh hot. You would have to be a total nobody to NOT get how cool DePalma is.


So LaDracul, Nachokoolaid, and seppukudkurosawa are nobodies??¿
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Postby burlivesleftnut on Sun Apr 08, 2007 2:22 pm

D'oh! I was looking at the join date, not the last post. Now I will discreetly cover up my crime.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:17 pm

I thought the DePalma fans in here might like to check THIS article out.

One thing I absolutely hate that some critics do is play the two faced fan game. They say they're big fans of a director and how brilliant they are in one line then in the next they knock them down and basically insult their movies. The guy who wrote this did just that and it makes my ^%$^% blood boil. :twisted:
Last edited by WinslowLeach on Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:28 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:26 pm

i posted this eons ago in the "Whose Fans Are the Bigger Apologists" thread in the EFBR, but I'll re-post it here...

another magazine that begins with S, Slant Magazine, had a nifty article entitled "Auteur Fatale: The Films of Brian DePalma".

interesting readings on all of his work, I like how the review of BODY DOUBLE pointed out the Brechtian aspects of that film.

“De Palma’s oeuvre owes at least some part of its brash vitality to the destructivism his critics sparked in the director’s bruised ego."
Personally, I'm an atheist in the voting booth and a theist in the movie theatre. I separate the morality of religion with the spirituality and solace of it. There is something boring about atheism.
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Postby WinslowLeach on Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:29 pm

I think DePalma is definitely someone who doesnt try to cater to anyone, esp critics. He makes the kinds of movies that interest him first.
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Postby Flumm on Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:50 pm

The Untouchables: Capone Rising


Director: Brian De Palma

Writers: Brian Koppelman, David Levien

Release Date: 2008 (USA)


Plot Outline: The story of Al Capone's arrival in Chicago, his dealings with cop Jimmy Malone, and his subsequent rise to power.

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Postby WinslowLeach on Thu Apr 12, 2007 8:07 am

Id like to see DePalma make something to bring him back to the Oscar arena. Hes such a great director, if he wanted to win an Oscar he could do it. All he has to do is make something more mainstream like Scorsese does. Hopefully The Untouchables prequel will be it.
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Postby Maui on Sun Jul 08, 2007 10:36 pm

Dressed to Kill.

How can you go wrong with Michael Caine as a transexual killer. I just loved this slasher movie - it was great. Hitchcock would have been proud. Sure there was a shower scene, similar to Psycho, but De Palma took his film one step further. I read somewhere that Hitchcock played with your mind, but De Palma raped your mind. Unforgettable scenes in this movie, the shower scene, the art gallery scene, at one point in the movie, there is no dialogue for about 15 minutes or so - but it's not necessary, as you are truly on the edge of your seat and the lack of dialogue makes it even more frightening. I think this movie is De Palma's best, with Carrie being a close 2nd.

MOD EDIT: The Dino, he has a gone anna added a the tiny-text to a your goddamn SPOILER, eh? YOU GODDAMN PUTZ!!
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Postby Cpt Kirks 2pay on Mon Jul 16, 2007 2:31 pm

I'm gonna go ahead and say that so far, Carlito's Way is my favourite. I dunno if it's his best, heck, there seems to be more scale and ambition in The Untouchables and Scarface but more than Carlito's Way being a smaller gem and a damn well perfectly made and acted movie, I think it has more personal appeal and effect on me. It is far more moving for starters, but the way that everything about Carlito's quest to grab the light is done with such romanticism, as Al Pacino himself even said.

I find that this approach is what makes it connect and touch our psyche inside as it is the efforts and fight of the 'dreamer' character that he is here that always makes us one with him. That in essence he is 'us' too as we are all dreamers trying to get to a better place. I know it might sound manipulative, but heh so what? It seems to be true and it damn well works.

Also Sean Penn's John Mcenroe looking hairstyle always makes me crack up. No wonder he get peed off and angry with people making fun of it on set.

How else do people think that this film compares to De Palma's others? Scarface what not? De Palma did say that he wanted and expected Carlito's Way to be a commercial success for him and that he was dissapointed when it wasn't. I also wanna know how much of the actual onscreen story is true and how it compares to the actual real life story of Carlito Brigante.
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Postby Maui on Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:06 pm

Maui wrote:Dressed to Kill.

How can you go wrong with Michael Caine as a transexual killer. I just loved this slasher movie - it was great. Hitchcock would have been proud. Sure there was a shower scene, similar to Psycho, but De Palma took his film one step further. I read somewhere that Hitchcock played with your mind, but De Palma raped your mind. Unforgettable scenes in this movie, the shower scene, the art gallery scene, at one point in the movie, there is no dialogue for about 15 minutes or so - but it's not necessary, as you are truly on the edge of your seat and the lack of dialogue makes it even more frightening. I think this movie is De Palma's best, with Carrie being a close 2nd.

MOD EDIT: The Dino, he has a gone anna added a the tiny-text to a your goddamn SPOILER, eh? YOU GODDAMN PUTZ!!


OOPS!!! Je m'excuse! :oops:
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Postby Cpt Kirks 2pay on Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:23 pm

What does that mean?
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Postby The Todd on Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:26 pm

Cpt Kirks 2pay wrote:What does that mean?


It means she speaks French.
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Postby Doc Holliday on Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:27 pm

Cpt Kirks 2pay wrote:I'm gonna go ahead and say that so far, Carlito's Way is my favourite. I dunno if it's his best, heck, there seems to be more scale and ambition in The Untouchables and Scarface but more than Carlito's Way being a smaller gem and a damn well perfectly made and acted movie, I think it has more personal appeal and effect on me. It is far more moving for starters, but the way that everything about Carlito's quest to grab the light is done with such romanticism, as Al Pacino himself even said.

I find that this approach is what makes it connect and touch our psyche inside as it is the efforts and fight of the 'dreamer' character that he is here that always makes us one with him. That in essence he is 'us' too as we are all dreamers trying to get to a better place. I know it might sound manipulative, but heh so what? It seems to be true and it damn well works.

Also Sean Penn's John Mcenroe looking hairstyle always makes me crack up. No wonder he get peed off and angry with people making fun of it on set.

How else do people think that this film compares to De Palma's others? Scarface what not? De Palma did say that he wanted and expected Carlito's Way to be a commercial success for him and that he was dissapointed when it wasn't. I also wanna know how much of the actual onscreen story is true and how it compares to the actual real life story of Carlito Brigante.


Carlito's Way is one of my favourite De Palma movies. It is to Scarface what UNFORGIVEN was to A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS.
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Postby Cpt Kirks 2pay on Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:31 pm

The Todd wrote:
Cpt Kirks 2pay wrote:What does that mean?


It means she speaks French.


It's CANADIANFrench you Dummy. And don't call Maui 'It means she' either.

Doc, please explain your reasons for your comments like a good little boy who has nothing else to write about.
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Postby Doc Holliday on Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:38 pm

Where one is a balls-to-the-wall uncompromising portrayal of the anti-hero, the other is an intelligent deconstruction of the same.
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Postby Cpt Kirks 2pay on Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:40 pm

Oh. Great. Er, thank you for playing, Doc.
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Postby havocSchultz on Mon Aug 06, 2007 3:34 am

Maui wrote:Dressed to Kill.

How can you go wrong with Michael Caine as a transexual killer. I just loved this slasher movie - it was great. Hitchcock would have been proud. Sure there was a shower scene, similar to Psycho, but De Palma took his film one step further. I read somewhere that Hitchcock played with your mind, but De Palma raped your mind. Unforgettable scenes in this movie, the shower scene, the art gallery scene, at one point in the movie, there is no dialogue for about 15 minutes or so - but it's not necessary, as you are truly on the edge of your seat and the lack of dialogue makes it even more frightening. I think this movie is De Palma's best, with Carrie being a close 2nd.

MOD EDIT: The Dino, he has a gone anna added a the tiny-text to a your goddamn SPOILER, eh? YOU GODDAMN PUTZ!!


You know, I was just reading through this thread - and I was getting close to the end and I was about to scream "Where's all the DRESSED TO KILL Love?!?!?!!?"


But now I don't have to...

Many thanx...
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Postby magicmonkey on Mon Aug 06, 2007 4:00 am

havocSchultz wrote:
Maui wrote:Dressed to Kill.

How can you go wrong with Michael Caine as a transexual killer. I just loved this slasher movie - it was great. Hitchcock would have been proud. Sure there was a shower scene, similar to Psycho, but De Palma took his film one step further. I read somewhere that Hitchcock played with your mind, but De Palma raped your mind. Unforgettable scenes in this movie, the shower scene, the art gallery scene, at one point in the movie, there is no dialogue for about 15 minutes or so - but it's not necessary, as you are truly on the edge of your seat and the lack of dialogue makes it even more frightening. I think this movie is De Palma's best, with Carrie being a close 2nd.

MOD EDIT: The Dino, he has a gone anna added a the tiny-text to a your goddamn SPOILER, eh? YOU GODDAMN PUTZ!!


You know, I was just reading through this thread - and I was getting close to the end and I was about to scream "Where's all the DRESSED TO KILL Love?!?!?!!?"


But now I don't have to...

Many thanx...


All hail the Dino, I nearly got spoiled.
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Postby Maui on Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:33 pm

havocSchultz wrote:
Maui wrote:Dressed to Kill.

How can you go wrong with Michael Caine as a transexual killer. I just loved this slasher movie - it was great. Hitchcock would have been proud. Sure there was a shower scene, similar to Psycho, but De Palma took his film one step further. I read somewhere that Hitchcock played with your mind, but De Palma raped your mind. Unforgettable scenes in this movie, the shower scene, the art gallery scene, at one point in the movie, there is no dialogue for about 15 minutes or so - but it's not necessary, as you are truly on the edge of your seat and the lack of dialogue makes it even more frightening. I think this movie is De Palma's best, with Carrie being a close 2nd.

MOD EDIT: The Dino, he has a gone anna added a the tiny-text to a your goddamn SPOILER, eh? YOU GODDAMN PUTZ!!


You know, I was just reading through this thread - and I was getting close to the end and I was about to scream "Where's all the DRESSED TO KILL Love?!?!?!!?"


But now I don't have to...

Many thanx...


Once again, the canuck power shines through with their incredible taste in film.
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Postby Chilli on Wed Aug 22, 2007 1:51 pm

COW is one of those films that I found amusing and disgusting in equal measure. It veered from a black comedy to an anti-war treaty so often that I was legitimately dazed, and horrified at Sean Penn's incredibly repugant overacting. It seems the film was trying to impart how war can drive people crazy, but the way they went about it made me sick to my stomach, and not in a 'wow, this is a masterpiece way.'

Carrie, I didn't take to either. The basic nature of the tale is okay, but I dislike the dreamlike quality it has. The role of Carrie is performed well, but it seems like everyone around her has been turned into an over-the-top caricature that serves to make her decidedly normal, which is a strange theme for the film to have. I think there's a more restrained version out there, a better one that would accentuate the positives of the book in a less flashy way.

I think DePalma is served better when he underplays films. He's good with trickery, but sometimes he seems so obsessed with that, that the film suffers through a lack of cohesive actor direction. It reminds me of another seventies director...
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Postby LeFlambeur on Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:43 am

Hmm, I'm confused...

Chilli wrote:The basic nature of the tale is okay, but I dislike the dreamlike quality it has.


But wasn't the surreal quality kind of the point? I've always pegged De Palma as descending (for better and for worse) from the expressionist tradition that goes way back to Lang and Murnau. This would explain why the performances in his films are so often described as "over the top" (lets face it the acting in Metropolis and Sunrise wasn't exactly method quality). Having actors play out their emotional states in a manor as physical and visual as possible was almost a requirement of the silent era, and I can see how it would strike people as excessive after the advent of sound.

Chilli wrote: ...but it seems like everyone around her has been turned into an over-the-top caricature that serves to make her decidedly normal, which is a strange theme for the film to have.


So I take it you didn't like A Clockwork Orange then?

Chilli wrote:I think DePalma is served better when he underplays films.


Since when has De Palma ever underplayed a film?

Chilli wrote:He's good with trickery...


Trickery?

Chilli wrote:It reminds me of another seventies director...


Who?
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Postby Chilli on Thu Aug 23, 2007 2:28 am

So I take it you didn't like A Clockwork Orange then?


I'm not sure if you can like ACO. I mean its a classic, but its not something I got joy from watching, rather an appreciation.

Since when has De Palma ever underplayed a film?


The Untouchables
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Postby LeFlambeur on Thu Aug 23, 2007 11:03 am

Chilli wrote:The Untouchables


Fair enough, but I still think that films like The Untouchables, Mission to Mars, and Mission Impossible might be considered underplayed for De Palma, but not nessicarily an average director.
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Postby Chilli on Thu Aug 23, 2007 11:04 am

LeFlambeur wrote:
Chilli wrote:The Untouchables


Fair enough, but I still think that films like The Untouchables, Mission to Mars, and Mission Impossible might be considered underplayed for De Palma, but not nessicarily an average director.


True, but this is a specifically DePalma thread. In terms of his work, they are underplayed, but in terms of the entire spectre they're rather garish.
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Postby Maui on Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:43 pm

I saw a trailer for Redacted before Lust, Caution a few days ago. Man, they revealed absolutely freakin' nothing in that trailer.

I really want to see this movie!

I am a huge fan of DePalma - love most of his stuff. Dressed to Kill being my all time favourite!
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Mon Jun 30, 2008 3:01 pm

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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby max314 on Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:17 pm

MIssion: Impossible was a fantastic film.

My favourite DePalma.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby so sorry on Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:35 pm

WinslowLeach wrote:For DePalma fans:

http://hp336-hp336.blogspot.com/2008/06 ... palma.html



Just when I've finally managed to wipe my mind clean of that shit fest Redacted, you had to bring this up!

Interesting choice of their top five DePalma films (Greetings, Carlito's Way, Carrie, the Untouchables, and #1 Blow Out), although I think the inclusion of Greetings is their way of saying "we're smarter than you 'cause we didn't put Scarface on this list).

And I've never actually seen Blow Out. If I had Netflix, I think I would have just added it to my queue!
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:38 pm

I havent seen Redacted yet myself. As far as those kinds of political films, I dont like them usually. I still want to see it though. I do think Casualities of War is a really great film by BDP.

Blow Out is a must see. Its a masterpiece. Its like everything thats great about BDP just came together perfectly.

Any else here a big fan of The Fury? I think that movie totally flew under the radar when it was released. Its so awesome.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby so sorry on Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:46 pm

WinslowLeach wrote:I havent seen Redacted yet myself. As far as those kinds of political films, I dont like them usually. I still want to see it though. I do think Casualities of War is a really great film by BDP.

Blow Out is a must see. Its a masterpiece. Its like everything thats great about BDP just came together perfectly.


Got it. Blow Out will find its way to me based on your comment!

And I know your a BDP fan, so there's no way I can convince you NOT to see Redacted, but man, it is so bad on literally every level possible. Like, Uwe Boll bad, but without the fun.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Thu Jul 03, 2008 2:08 pm

I know what youre saying but being such a fan of BDP, I gotta watch it once.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby havocSchultz on Thu Jul 03, 2008 2:08 pm

Dressed To Kill DEFEATS all!!!
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Maui on Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:29 pm

havocSchultz wrote:Dressed To Kill DEFEATS all!!!


Yes, it most certainly does. My favourite as well.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Fri Jul 04, 2008 8:15 am

DTK is an awesome film. Dont forget to watch Phantom of The Paradise! :)
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby havocSchultz on Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:21 am

WinslowLeach wrote:DTK is an awesome film. Dont forget to watch Phantom of The Paradise! :)



Up here in Winnipeg we have like the world's largest following for that film...

It's insanely popular...




by Doug Carlson

Go on. Ask. Everyone does.

Phantom-mania grips Winnipeg, 1975.

It's the question they all ask...and the question we can't answer.

"Why was Phantom of the Paradise such a big hit--only in Winnipeg?

"Why Winnipeg?!"

The short answer is: we don't know! We didn't know at the time, and we don't really know now. (But that hasn't stopped us from trying.)

But something definitely happened in Winnipeg that didn't happen in any other city in North America*: we fell in love with Brian De Palma's 1974 comedy-horror-musical-tragedy Phantom of the Paradise. Interviewed at the time, a booking executive for Phantom's Canadian distributor stated: "It is incredible how well the picture has done here, but it only happened in Winnipeg, nowhere else. In Vancouver, the film lasted only one week; it went a week in Calgary, only a week in Edmonton and then people stopped coming. But in Winnipeg they just never stopped!"

How a movie could become a hit in complete isolation from the rest of civilization is a phenomenon unique in modern entertainment, yet we Winnipeggers gave this movie its only "legs"...and kept them standing for four and a half months over the winter and spring of 1975. We also snapped up the official soundtrack album in record numbers, buying over 20,000 copies (and contributing in large part to its official gold status in Canada), and made a "Beatle" out of songwriter and Phantom star Paul Williams for one magical day that June.

April 26, 1975 Why Phantom caught on only in Winnipeg is a mystery for the ages, but as far as we know there was no poisoning of the Shoal Lake water supply with hallucinogenic drugs, nor any other factor that can be attributed to its singular success here. However, if our surveys can be trusted, the median age of those who attended our Phantompalooza events in 2005 and 2006 was around 40, suggesting that most of Phantom's Winnipeg audience was around 10 back in 1975...MUCH younger than the young adult audience 20th-Century Fox had targeted with their misguided marketing efforts. In other words, this was a very specific demographic: old enough to get away from their parents and into a movie with a Mature rating, but not old enough to be jaded by the film's faux glam rock when the real thing could be had with almost any concert ticket. In other words, its mix of music and mayhem made it a relatively safe alternative to attending the KISS and Alice Cooper shows that were still the exclusive domain of older siblings.

But the seeds were here all along for something like this to happen. The forties and fifties saw a renaissance in our arts scene, culminating in international renown for our ballet and symphony. In the sixties, our response to the British invasion framed rock and roll not as a source of fear, but rather, immense pride over the ground-breaking success of Winnipeg artists like The Guess Who and Neil Young. And thanks to a perfect storm of federal (1967), provincial (1970) and municipal (1974) centenaries, funding flowed like manna from all three levels of government; when the dust settled, we found ourselves with shiny new arts facilities, including a concert hall, museum, art gallery, theatre centre and planetarium. This sudden concentration of artistic endeavours, combined with our relative isolation both within the province and on the continent, meant that it was much easier to realize a cultural tipping point in Winnipeg, a vast city-state not that concerned with looking over our shoulder at Toronto, or Vancouver, or Minneapolis when we had our own vibrant and eccentric scene to enjoy.

There are clearly three components to Winnipeg's Phantom-mania: 1) the movie itself, 2) the Paul Williams concert of June 1975, and 3) the movie's post-concert resurrection, which made it seem as if it played on local screens for well over a year. Based on interviews, personal recollections, and exhaustive forensic research into the archives of local media, this article explores all three aspects of Winnipeg's love affair with Phantom of the Paradise...a source of eye-blinking confusion or general mirth to outsiders, but near-familial pride to those of us within city limits who still call ourselves 'phans' over three decades later.




phantompalooza.com
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Chris a.k.a StuntMike on Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:31 am

As a Winnipeger, of course I love Phantom the most. Sisters is damn good also.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:31 am

Ive been to that site before. Its the best Phantom fansite online. Thats so cool that Canada really embraced the movie. Its bigger than Rocky Horror up there. 8-)
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Chris a.k.a StuntMike on Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:33 am


by Doug Carlson

Go on. Ask. Everyone does.

Phantom-mania grips Winnipeg, 1975.

It's the question they all ask...and the question we can't answer.

"Why was Phantom of the Paradise such a big hit--only in Winnipeg?

"Why Winnipeg?!"

The short answer is: we don't know! We didn't know at the time, and we don't really know now. (But that hasn't stopped us from trying.)

But something definitely happened in Winnipeg that didn't happen in any other city in North America*: we fell in love with Brian De Palma's 1974 comedy-horror-musical-tragedy Phantom of the Paradise. Interviewed at the time, a booking executive for Phantom's Canadian distributor stated: "It is incredible how well the picture has done here, but it only happened in Winnipeg, nowhere else. In Vancouver, the film lasted only one week; it went a week in Calgary, only a week in Edmonton and then people stopped coming. But in Winnipeg they just never stopped!"

How a movie could become a hit in complete isolation from the rest of civilization is a phenomenon unique in modern entertainment, yet we Winnipeggers gave this movie its only "legs"...and kept them standing for four and a half months over the winter and spring of 1975. We also snapped up the official soundtrack album in record numbers, buying over 20,000 copies (and contributing in large part to its official gold status in Canada), and made a "Beatle" out of songwriter and Phantom star Paul Williams for one magical day that June.

April 26, 1975 Why Phantom caught on only in Winnipeg is a mystery for the ages, but as far as we know there was no poisoning of the Shoal Lake water supply with hallucinogenic drugs, nor any other factor that can be attributed to its singular success here. However, if our surveys can be trusted, the median age of those who attended our Phantompalooza events in 2005 and 2006 was around 40, suggesting that most of Phantom's Winnipeg audience was around 10 back in 1975...MUCH younger than the young adult audience 20th-Century Fox had targeted with their misguided marketing efforts. In other words, this was a very specific demographic: old enough to get away from their parents and into a movie with a Mature rating, but not old enough to be jaded by the film's faux glam rock when the real thing could be had with almost any concert ticket. In other words, its mix of music and mayhem made it a relatively safe alternative to attending the KISS and Alice Cooper shows that were still the exclusive domain of older siblings.

But the seeds were here all along for something like this to happen. The forties and fifties saw a renaissance in our arts scene, culminating in international renown for our ballet and symphony. In the sixties, our response to the British invasion framed rock and roll not as a source of fear, but rather, immense pride over the ground-breaking success of Winnipeg artists like The Guess Who and Neil Young. And thanks to a perfect storm of federal (1967), provincial (1970) and municipal (1974) centenaries, funding flowed like manna from all three levels of government; when the dust settled, we found ourselves with shiny new arts facilities, including a concert hall, museum, art gallery, theatre centre and planetarium. This sudden concentration of artistic endeavours, combined with our relative isolation both within the province and on the continent, meant that it was much easier to realize a cultural tipping point in Winnipeg, a vast city-state not that concerned with looking over our shoulder at Toronto, or Vancouver, or Minneapolis when we had our own vibrant and eccentric scene to enjoy.

There are clearly three components to Winnipeg's Phantom-mania: 1) the movie itself, 2) the Paul Williams concert of June 1975, and 3) the movie's post-concert resurrection, which made it seem as if it played on local screens for well over a year. Based on interviews, personal recollections, and exhaustive forensic research into the archives of local media, this article explores all three aspects of Winnipeg's love affair with Phantom of the Paradise...a source of eye-blinking confusion or general mirth to outsiders, but near-familial pride to those of us within city limits who still call ourselves 'phans' over three decades later.




phantompalooza.com[/quote]

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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Spandau Belly on Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:15 pm

Obviously I voted for Scarface as my fave, any of you guys who know me on these chatboards could've called that one from fifty paces.


But I guess I would like to talk about Snake Eyes. Apparently DePalma didn't get to realize his full vision with that film and the ending was a result of a reshoot (I'm not sure if it was after a test screening or not). I haven't really dug too deep, but I can't find out what got cut and what DePalma had planned for the ending.

I disagree that the film was too show-offy. My only problem was it got too conventional too fast and like most caper movies you have that fine line to walk where you can't fit in as much detail and plot as a James Ellroy novel into a normal length movie so you either end up with a movie that's obvious and simple or that's a total mess and full of plot holes. For the most part the best approach is to make the investigation secondary and some personal dilemma of the hero's a more central part of the story. And I think they tried to do this with this film but some of that stuff probably got cut. I liked that Cage was a lifelong corrupt scumbag cop dealing with a sudden inexplicable urge to do the right thing. Also, the dynamic of the friendship with Gary Senise needed more depth.

But the movie had it's high points (on Carla Gugino's chest). I also crapped my pants laughing when at the end Cage's face is all busted up and mumbles triumphantly "Snake eyes, the house wins!" that was pure Cage! I would be interested in seeing a director's cut, but I would hope it would retain that moment.

Anyway, as it was, it was a caper movie that made sense and had some good moments, but just wasn't developed into something more when I think it could've been.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:21 pm

I saw Snake Eyes at the movies back when it was released. I didnt love it, but over the years Ive rewatched it and have found more of an appreciation for it. One thing is for sure when you watch that film and all his others, DePalma is a master of pure cinema storytelling. Noone since Hitchcock is as technically brilliant as him with a camera as voyeuristic eye. I think his flair for elaborate film sequences definitely come from his background as a computer science whiz. If you watch DTK, Peter Miller (Keith Gordon) is basically DePalma as a youth.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Chris a.k.a StuntMike on Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:52 pm

The master of split-screen. :mrgreen:
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby magicmonkey on Fri Jul 04, 2008 8:49 pm

I voted "Phantom of the Paradise", cos, well, it is his best film. Mmmmm, Faustian pacts, great gore, Jessica Harper,camp, passions and LURIDITY! Oh yeah, and a couple of tunes. If John Lennon had been Barry Manilow in the Rolling Stones then this may well have been HIS life story!!1!
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Geoi on Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:55 pm

I love Casualties of War. I love nearly all De Palma movies, but this one is my favourite because it's my favourite war movie.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Maui on Sat Jul 05, 2008 12:33 pm

WinslowLeach wrote:DTK is an awesome film. Dont forget to watch Phantom of The Paradise! :)


Alright! I seem to have missed this one.
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby Peven on Sat Jul 05, 2008 12:34 pm

where's the "Body Double" love?
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Re: THE FILMS OF BRIAN DEPALMA

Postby WinslowLeach on Sat Jul 05, 2008 12:48 pm

I like it but its not one of my favorites really.
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