Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Which director made the best films, made the best visuals, or smelled the best? This is the forum to find out.

Which film of Mel Brooks do you enjoy the most?

The Producers
2
6%
The Twelve Chairs
1
3%
Blazing Saddles
9
29%
Young Frankenstein
12
39%
Silent Movie
1
3%
HIgh Anxiety
3
10%
History of the World pt. 1
2
6%
Spaceballs
1
3%
Life Stinks
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 31

Postby Wolfpack on Wed Jan 23, 2008 1:11 pm

I was kinda disappointed when I found out there wasn't actually a History of the World Part II. Part I was great, and it could have used a follow-up. But alas, the little teaser at the end was just a part of the show.
"Alright Shaggy - you and Scooby head over that way. The girls and I will go this way."
User avatar
Wolfpack
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2785
Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 11:48 am
Location: Asheville, NC

Postby Vegeta on Wed Jan 23, 2008 1:15 pm

Wolfpack wrote:I was kinda disappointed when I found out there wasn't actually a History of the World Part II. Part I was great, and it could have used a follow-up. But alas, the little teaser at the end was just a part of the show.


Jews in Space
User avatar
Vegeta
PARAGON OF VACUITY
 
Posts: 6274
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 11:22 am
Location: U.S.S.A.

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:06 am

From THR:
Walk of Fame: Mel Brooks
Frank Swertlow wrote:Mel Brooks is one busy guy. He's one of a few entertainers to win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony for his talents as screenwriter, composer, lyricist, comedian, actor and producer. At 83, he's adapting his 1974 comedy, "Blazing Saddles," into a musical, is a panelist at the inaugural TCM Classic Film Festival and is about to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He recently spoke with The Hollywood Reporter's Frank Swertlow.

The Hollywood Reporter: You were born Melvin Kaminsky. Why "Mel Brooks"?

Mel Brooks: My mother's maiden name was Brookman. I was a drummer and I erased the "man" -- it was shorter -- and added an "s." People would say, "Hey, Mel Brooks, you're a pretty good drummer." Mel Kaminsky is a like an acting coach, listen to him carefully; he's the actor's friend.

THR: When did you know you had a gift for laughter?

Brooks: In the crib, three or four days old. I saw faces looking down, big faces, and they were grinning and laughing, and I realized, "OK, this is my mandate, keeping these faces smiling and laughing."

THR: What's it like when nobody laughs?

Brooks: It happened once. I was booked into the Morningside in the Catskills. It was a semi-religious hotel, and they spoke Yiddish. I came out in English, and you could hear waves of noises, but no laughs. When you tell a bad joke, silence is heard. You suck it up and tell another bad joke.

THR: Is it harder to make people laugh today or when you started?

Brooks: It's easier today. Few survived those Jewish audiences -- Buddy Hackett, Jan Murray, Red Buttons. They'd boo you. Old Jewish ladies would be sitting in the tea room, eating sponge cake and would say, "Melvin, you stink, but we love you."

THR: You were a combat engineer during World War II; did defusing Nazi landmines help prepare you for comedy?

Brooks: I was 19 or 20; I thought I was in a newsreel. You don't know what danger is. Out of the 40 times I went out, I came close to death once. I tripped a German S mine, filled with ball bearings that would come up waist high and rip you apart. This time, the mine didn't explode. These are miracles. They prepare you for the unknown.

THR: When did you go behind the camera?

Brooks: I wrote "The Producers" first. I went to the bookstores and got movie scripts and wrote in "fade out, dolly in." I start with an idea and an ending. That's my technique. I don't bother with a beginning or middle.

THR: How did "The Producers" become a Broadway musical?

Brooks: (Anne Bancroft, Brooks' wife) sent me to my room and said, "Write the title song." She said I was a very talented songwriter and never give up that part of me. David Geffen was the first person to say the movie should be a Broadway musical. It just needed a few songs. He sent me to Jerry Herman who wrote "Hello Dolly" and "Mame." Herman refused; he said I was going to do this. He got me the job.

THR: What is your fascination with Hitler? "The Producers" has "Springtime for Hitler"; you sang the "Hitler Rag" in "To Be or Not to Be."

Brooks: It's my job to bring down Hitler and Torquemada. My mission is to ridicule them. If you can make people laugh at these figures, you bring them down them faster than getting onto a soapbox.


Mel Brooks timeline

1950 Joins the writing staff of "Your Show of Shows," working with Sid Caesar, Carl Reiner and Neil Simon.

1956 Earns his first Emmy nomination for writing "Caesar's Hour."

1960 Partners with Reiner on the hit comedy album, "2000 Year Old Man."

1964 His first film, "The Critic," wins a short subject Oscar.

1965 Creates the TV series "Get Smart" with Buck Henry.

1969 Wins an original screenplay Oscar for "The Producers," his first feature.

1974 "Blazing Saddles" and "Young Frankenstein" are released.

1997 Wins an Emmy for his guest starring role on "Mad About You," which he repeats in 1998 and 1999.

1999 Along with Reiner, wins a spoken comedy album Grammy for "The 2000 Year Old Man in the Year 2000."

2001 The musical version of "The Producers" wins 12 Tonys.

2005 "The Producers" becomes a hit film -- again.

2010 Works on a musical version of "Blazing Saddles."
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby The Vicar on Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:49 am

Blazing Saddles, with Young Frankenstein pulling in second.

Blazing Saddles is probably the funniest film evar....explosive laughter that comes from the gut.
The kind of laughter that makes you spew popcorn and coke all over the poor bastard sitting in front of you.
It works just as well today as it did then, and if some spunk wad tries to "reimagine" Blazing Saddles,
he will die with my teeth in his throat.
.
........................................
Image
User avatar
The Vicar
Fear & Loathing in the Zone
 
Posts: 16179
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 10:21 am

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby minstrel on Fri Apr 23, 2010 12:48 pm

Well, I won't say Blazing Saddles is the funniest movie evar (I'm partial to Monty Python), but it's certainly in my top 5 comedies of all time. And Young Frankenstein isn't far behind. Peter Boyle's burning-thumb take gets me every time.
"Everybody is equally shitty and wrong." - Ribbons
User avatar
minstrel
Leader of the Insquirrelgency
 
Posts: 12634
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: Area 52

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby DennisMM on Sat Apr 24, 2010 5:02 pm

There are some moments in Blazing Saddles that flop badly, at least for me, but it contains one of the great movie songs of all time. Also, "I Get a Kick Out of You" is dead brilliant.
"If we don't believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don't believe in it at all." -- Noam Chomsky
DennisMM
NOT PARTICULARLY MENACING
 
Posts: 16808
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 5:02 pm
Location: Watchin' the reels go 'round and 'round

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby Nachokoolaid on Sun Apr 25, 2010 2:00 am

For me, I can laugh at Blazing Saddles every time I watch it. It never seems to get old. But honestly, Spaceballs has a soft spot in my heart.
User avatar
Nachokoolaid
THE DORK KNIGHT
 
Posts: 5588
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:00 am
Location: Gotham City

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby Jabbadonut on Sun Apr 25, 2010 7:46 am

I love all of the nominated films, so would choose "all of the above" for my choice as best. However, from a cinematic perspective, Young Frankenstein is his most "complete" film. It would be the technically best one in my book.
Look! Even Steve is throwing chocolate snowballs . . . oh . . .
User avatar
Jabbadonut
REAL DRAGON
 
Posts: 479
Joined: Sat Nov 21, 2009 9:04 pm

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby minstrel on Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:47 pm

SEDAGIVE?????
"Everybody is equally shitty and wrong." - Ribbons
User avatar
minstrel
Leader of the Insquirrelgency
 
Posts: 12634
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: Area 52

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby Peven on Sun Apr 25, 2010 1:20 pm

High Anxiety, of course.......
Image

perversely contrarian since 2005
Peven
Is This Real Life?
 
Posts: 14618
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 10:45 am
Location: Group W bench

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby Kornula on Mon May 03, 2010 2:08 am

I voted for 12 chairs - strictly as a film; its seamless. Tight story, pacing all that.... though Bwazing saddles is a close second. The jokes in Young Froookneschtein are dragged out. The 12 chairs has that two gags that still make me spill milk out my nose; when The priest has lost hope in finding the chairs.. Is on his knees confessing to god that he is sorry he gave up everything just to find the chairs.. then he sees one of the chairs walk by - instatly gets up, "thank you God!" and walks on. The timing and delivery is captured for all time.
User avatar
Kornula
TOMBOY BEANPOLE
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2008 8:45 pm
Location: Eureka, California

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby Brocktune on Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:27 pm

Kornula wrote:I voted for 12 chairs - strictly as a film; its seamless. Tight story, pacing all that.... though Bwazing saddles is a close second. The jokes in Young Froookneschtein are dragged out. The 12 chairs has that two gags that still make me spill milk out my nose; when The priest has lost hope in finding the chairs.. Is on his knees confessing to god that he is sorry he gave up everything just to find the chairs.. then he sees one of the chairs walk by - instatly gets up, "thank you God!" and walks on. The timing and delivery is captured for all time.


ha how funny. it was mel brooks's b-day on monday, so to honor and celebrate, we did a brooks-a-thon in blu-ray for the first time ever. also for the first time ever was my buddy watching the twelve chairs. picking a "best" brooks film isnt easy, but 12 chairs is easily, and sadly his most overlooked and under appreciated film. not to say that it is maligned, but it isnt really talked about very often. which is a bummer, cuz its his most touching, "artsiest", and probably most personal film. different kind of laughs in this one. no less rewarding tho. i absolutely adore this film!
Image
User avatar
Brocktune
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 6490
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 10:32 pm
Location: Pico & Sepulveda

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby magicmonkey on Thu Jul 01, 2010 11:44 pm

Where is "Modern Romance" on this list? Before I saw that I just thought Brooks was a megalomaniac screwball. But, "Modern Romance" is like, instant classic. I've not seen Twelve Chairs though, is it in the same "low key" vein?
magicmonkey
I AM fucking Zen
 
Posts: 6032
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2005 8:26 am
Location: Shanghizzo

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby Nachokoolaid on Fri Jul 02, 2010 3:15 am

magicmonkey wrote:Where is "Modern Romance" on this list? Before I saw that I just thought Brooks was a megalomaniac screwball. But, "Modern Romance" is like, instant classic. I've not seen Twelve Chairs though, is it in the same "low key" vein?


Twelve Chairs is one of those rare Brooks movies where he really loses all the parody stuff, and there's more of a plot that drives the story along. Probably because it's based on a Russian folk story and not his own concept. It's not bad, and it's cool to see Frank Langella so young. But it's not his best. Enjoyable though.
User avatar
Nachokoolaid
THE DORK KNIGHT
 
Posts: 5588
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:00 am
Location: Gotham City

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby so sorry on Fri Jul 02, 2010 8:43 am

Brocktune wrote:
Kornula wrote:I voted for 12 chairs - strictly as a film; its seamless. Tight story, pacing all that.... though Bwazing saddles is a close second. The jokes in Young Froookneschtein are dragged out. The 12 chairs has that two gags that still make me spill milk out my nose; when The priest has lost hope in finding the chairs.. Is on his knees confessing to god that he is sorry he gave up everything just to find the chairs.. then he sees one of the chairs walk by - instatly gets up, "thank you God!" and walks on. The timing and delivery is captured for all time.


ha how funny. it was mel brooks's b-day on monday, so to honor and celebrate, we did a brooks-a-thon in blu-ray for the first time ever. also for the first time ever was my buddy watching the twelve chairs. picking a "best" brooks film isnt easy, but 12 chairs is easily, and sadly his most overlooked and under appreciated film. not to say that it is maligned, but it isnt really talked about very often. which is a bummer, cuz its his most touching, "artsiest", and probably most personal film. different kind of laughs in this one. no less rewarding tho. i absolutely adore this film!


I'd love to know what movies you watched and more importantly in what order.
User avatar
so sorry
Deacon Blues
 
Posts: 15632
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 11:29 am

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby MacCready on Sat Jul 03, 2010 12:04 am

The Twelve Chairs is excellent, but I'd still rate Blazing Saddles as Mel's funniest.
The Chairs, though, as pointed out by others, is the least self-consciously Mel Brookian film he's made,
and therefore worth a look on that basis alone. Ron Moody is priceless in this.
User avatar
MacCready
MAN IN SUIT
 
Posts: 835
Joined: Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:52 am

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby RaulMonkey on Sat Jul 03, 2010 12:20 am

magicmonkey wrote:Where is "Modern Romance" on this list? Before I saw that I just thought Brooks was a megalomaniac screwball. But, "Modern Romance" is like, instant classic. I've not seen Twelve Chairs though, is it in the same "low key" vein?


I think you're getting your Brookses confused there, brother. "Modern Romance" is an Albert Brooks film. I just watched it and his "Real Life" last month. A couple of solid pieces for sure. Very mature, yet silly.
Image
User avatar
RaulMonkey
ZONE AMBASSADOR
 
Posts: 3402
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 4:12 am
Location: YYC

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby magicmonkey on Sat Jul 03, 2010 4:08 am

RaulMonkey wrote:
magicmonkey wrote:Where is "Modern Romance" on this list? Before I saw that I just thought Brooks was a megalomaniac screwball. But, "Modern Romance" is like, instant classic. I've not seen Twelve Chairs though, is it in the same "low key" vein?


I think you're getting your Brookses confused there, brother. "Modern Romance" is an Albert Brooks film. I just watched it and his "Real Life" last month. A couple of solid pieces for sure. Very mature, yet silly.


Heck yeah, incredibly silly, with an actually detestable but "mildly" sympathetic lead. Its not often that leads are portrayed as actual idiots rather than just acting like them! And as idiots that drive a Porsche!!!! It brought a great realism to the piece that is absolutely recognisable, not just in myself but in its portrayal of others too. I'll have to check out "Real Life", now that I have my Brooks' the right way around...

My Fav Mel Brooks has got to be The Producers.
magicmonkey
I AM fucking Zen
 
Posts: 6032
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2005 8:26 am
Location: Shanghizzo

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:44 am

Mel Brooks on Comedy Legends Madeline Kahn and Gene Wilder
The 41st recipient of AFI's highest honor opens up about his six-decade career, late wife Anne Bancroft and why he kept working with the same circle of actors: "You know what they're capable of, how high they can fly."

Michael Walker wrote:The Hollywood Reporter: Why do you think Hollywood so rarely acknowledges comedy directing as an awards-worthy endeavor?

Mel Brooks: I have never been saluted as a director in my life. I am a comedy force: I'm a stand-up; I'm a comedy writer; I'm a producer. But I've never been saluted as a film director. They think comedy is frivolous. But real comedy has a lot to say about the human condition and said so beautifully over the years. [The AFI] is the first that said, "You're a movie director."

THR: Your first movie, The Producers, is 45 years old. Why do you think it still seems fresh?

Brooks: If you make something that makes sense, that is basically truthful about the human condition, it works -- it stays alive. If you're just doing things for laughs and not paying attention to human truths, it's not gonna last. Comedy should never be suddenly au courant. I never do political comedy because they keep changing the presidents, so you can't have fun with them.

THR: Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained owed a debt to Blazing Saddles.

Brooks: I loved it. I love him; I really admire his bravery. But somebody has to tell him you cannot run Abraham Lincoln over with a Buick -- you've gotta stop somewhere in making up history. I mean, he had Hitler and Goebbels and Goring in Inglourious Basterds in some kind of movie house in Paris. It was crazy.

THR: A lot of the jokes in Blazing Saddles now would be perceived as politically incorrect.

Brooks: We used the N-word in Blazing Saddles because we had to show what Black Bart the sheriff was facing and what he was going through, and the struggle to achieve his vision of cleaning up the Western town and actually being liked by the citizens. But you need that -- you need all the forces that are against him -- and you gotta use the N-word.

THR: Do you leave space in your direction for presumed laughs?

Brooks: I had no idea the farting scene in Blazing Saddles would be that hysterical. I cut to the campfire; I cut to the plate of beans; I cut to Slim Pickens; I cut to the horses. I needed the cuts so that I could give the audience some rest from the relentless onslaught of farts.

THR: You're famous for working with the same actors, including Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn and Cloris Leachman.

Brooks: It's so much better to have a stock company of players. You know what they're capable of, how high they can fly. You're not writing in the dark and then casting. I'm writing High Anxiety before it's a movie -- it's just an idea. And I know I have Madeline Kahn. I know how crazy I can go, and she's gonna nail it. Same thing with Gene Wilder, whether it was sad and touching or whether it was hysterical.

THR: Anne Bancroft was your wife and creative partner for 40 years. How did having her by your side contribute to your career?

Brooks: That was the yardstick for me; that was the gold. She had incredible taste. She knew what was really good, what was funny and what was unique and original. If it was tired or cliched, she let me know in no uncertain terms.

THR: What do you think of the state of comedy today?

Brooks: I thought when Richard Pryor died, that was the end of comedy. He was my favorite comedy talent. But we go on. Sarah Silverman is genuinely talented and funny. Where was she when I had Madeline Kahn, the greatest comedienne that ever lived? What I'm saying is that, somehow, they're born. They come along. It goes on. Never as good as my stuff, but pretty damn good.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby Tyrone_Shoelaces on Sun Feb 16, 2014 8:34 pm

Image
User avatar
Tyrone_Shoelaces
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3955
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 3:33 am
Location: Northern Frontier

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:06 pm

TheDigitalBits:
EDGE OF TOMORROW, BATMAN: 25TH, YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN: 40TH, VIKINGS: S2, NEW STREISAND BDS & LAUREN BACALL RIP
Bill Hunt wrote:20th Century Fox is also getting in on the catalog anniversary edition action on 9/9 with a brand new Young Frankenstein: 40th Anniversary Edition Blu-ray.

Extras will include audio commentary with director Mel Brooks, interviews with stars Marty Feldman, Gene Wilder, and Cloris Leachman, deleted scenes and outtakes, production photo galleries, the Blucher Button, 4 featurettes (Inside the Lab: Secret Formulas to the Making of Young Frankenstein, It’s Alive: Creating a Monster Classic, Making FrankenSense of Young Frankenstein, and Transylvanian Lullaby: The Music of John Norris), and more.

And starting on 9/1, if you visit the YoungFrankSweeps.com website (it’s not up yet), you’ll be able to enter for a chance to win one of 40 set photos signed by Brooks himself.


The Blucher Button!
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Wed Sep 10, 2014 11:48 am

User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Fri Sep 12, 2014 5:37 pm

User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Sun Nov 09, 2014 8:48 am

NERDIST PODCAST NOVEMBER 26, 2012: MEL BROOKS
Chris, Matt and Jonah sit down with a legend! The amazing Mel Brooks comes on the show to tell some hilarious stories about pitching his movies, how he and Carl Reiner still get each other to laugh, and much more!
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Sat Nov 29, 2014 3:56 am

User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 19, 2014 6:12 am

SPOILERS!!!
'Young Frankenstein': Read THR's 1974 Review
In Dec. 1974, as Gene Wilder's Young Frankenstein hit theaters, The Hollywood Reporter gave a rather luke-warm review, stating "It is good-natured, lowbrow, back lot, hit or miss humor, but with no cumulative effect beyond its succession of hard worked jokes." Now recognized as an essential part of the Mel Brooks canon, the film currently sits at No. 72 on THR's entertainment industry ranking of Hollywood's Favorite Films. The original THR review is below.

Mel Brooks’ new Frankenstein comedy, written and starring Gene Wilder, is closer in spirit to the 1948 ‘Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein’ travesty than either the 1931 Karloff version or the 1974 Warhol send-up. It is an old-fashioned programmer-type comedy in which all your favorite funny people get together and ham up a well-known story.

The screenplay recognizably follows the basic Mary Shelley story using repetitions skillfully to milk its jokes. It is good-natured, lowbrow, back lot, hit or miss humor, but with no cumulative effect beyond its succession of hard worked jokes. More theatrical than cinematic in its conception, this group effort relies on the improvisation of its performers.

Gene Wilder as Dr. Frankenstein mugs his way through with straightman reactions of disbelief and then crazed inspirations. Peter Boyle, still recognizable beneath rather tame monster makeup by William Tuttle, follows an unscary, dim-witted approach, carrying the monster’s need to be loved to its most literal extreme.

Marty Feldman as the humpbacked Igor is the most consistently funny, capable of stealing any scene with a dilation of his bulging eyes. Madeline Kahn deserves a more original character than her tease fiancée role which she nonetheless plays to the hilt. Cloris Leachman is misused in broad caricature.

As a police chief, Kenneth Mars needs more to do than simply goose step his mechanical limbs like Dr. Strangelove. Gene Hackman, hidden under a hermit’s beard, gets good mileage from a blindman routine. Liam Dunn is funny as a wasted old codger volunteer for Wilder’s amusingly unethical classroom demonstrations.

Michael Gruskoff’s modest production, shot in black and white and small screen, works more for movie buff nostalgia than flash or spectacle.

Dale Hennesy’s production design feels much like the 1931 version to the extent of having Kenneth Stricfaden, who worked on the 1931 laboratory mechanisms, revive his fantasy designs.

Director Brooks executes several good jokes on horror movie style, but his film has no distinctive visual style of its own. His shooting is less interesting than his staging, but is coyly effective when imitating carefully composed 30’s style static frames, well realized in Gerald Hirschfeld’s competent photography. Thunder and lighting effects punctuate throughout.

Dorothy Jeakins’ costumes effectively bring out the joke dimensions of each character. Aside from fancy optical transitions, John Howard’s editing is unstylish, but serviceable. John Morris adapts old music to campy ends, the monster frequently being lulled by a violin solo by Gerald Vinci. – John H. Dorr
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jan 16, 2015 4:51 am

A "Bullet" Galaxy Is Piercing Through Other Galaxies At Ludicrous Speed
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Sun Feb 01, 2015 3:07 am

Real Time with Bill Maher: Overtime - January 30, 2015 (HBO)
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jun 28, 2016 9:54 am

Mel Brooks on how to play Hitler, and how he almost died making Spaceballs


Mel Brooks Remembers the Funniest Movie He Ever Made
Stories of almost quitting Blazing Saddles, working with Richard Pryor, the disastrous response from Warner, and how he'd do a Spaceballs sequel


AMERICAN MASTERS
Mel Brooks: Make A Noise
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Young Frankenstein

Postby TheButcher on Sun Sep 04, 2016 9:36 am


Steven Gaydos wrote:The four guys sitting around the lunch table in Beverly Hills have been business associates and friends for decades.

Many decades.


This includes the decade known as the ’70s, when lunchee Mel Brooks directed and co-wrote “Young Frankenstein” (1974) for fellow lunchees, former Fox studio chief Alan Ladd Jr. and the film’s producer, Michael Gruskoff, as well as longtime Ladd associate Jay Kanter, who once repped the likes of Marlon Brando, Grace Kelly and Marilyn Monroe.


But this is clearly Brooks’ show, a point he reinforces when Gruskoff tries to tell their guest about the day the two of them and star Gene Wilder pitched the “Young Frankenstein” project to the top brass at Columbia Pictures.

Gruskoff may have gotten through the first word of the first sentence but he quickly and wisely lets Brooks finish: “LET ME TELL THE STORY I CAN TELL IT BETTER THAN YOU.”

“So everything was great, they loved the pitch, the budget was no problem,” recalls Brooks, “and I think we were almost out to Gower Street when I whispered, ‘Oh one more thing: it’s going to be in black and white.’ Suddenly there was a thundering herd of Jews descending on us; ‘What are you talking about??!!’”

But Brooks quickly gets to the real point of his story: “Then we took it to Laddie (Ladd Jr.) who had only been at Fox a few months and when we told him it had to be in black and white he said, ‘Of course it does.’ There’s the difference.”

Today Brooks is a genuine Comedy God with seven legendary decades of hits under his belt in virtually all genres, including records (with fellow God Carl Reiner), television, films and Broadway. But in 1973 when he and Gruskoff were trying to set up “Young Frankenstein,” which started as a Wilder treatment, Gruskoff was coming off the Dennis Hopper drug-addled epic fail “The Last Movie” and Brooks had just swan-dived at the box office with “The Twelve Chairs.”

“‘The Producers’ made a penny and ‘Twelve Chairs’ less than a penny,” recalls Brooks. “We had no script but we had Gene, Peter Boyle and Marty Feldman and none of them meant anything.”

Now, 40 years later, with Fox Home Entertainment rolling out a commemorative Blu-ray, Brooks’ Hands and Feet Ceremony Sept. 8 at the Chinese Theatre and a tribute screening Sept. 9 at the Goldwyn, Brooks acknowledges the current studio scene would be a tough place to replicate the Ladd-led Fox lot of 1974.

“Laddie had faith in the people who were making the films,” recalls Brooks. “He trusted (Robert) Altman to deliver the movie he said he was going to deliver. You didn’t get a lot of notes from Laddie. He wasn’t a fool, but it was more about the filmmakers than the films. Columbia had told us we needed to cut the budget from $2 million to $1.8. Laddie said it should be $2.2 (million).”

The Ladd bet paid off handsomely for Fox, winding up in the Christmas season as one of the year’s five top-grossing films.

But Ladd’s sigh of relief probably came much earlier in the year when “Blazing Saddles,” the film that Brooks made for Warner Bros. after “Twelve Chairs,” but unreleased when “Young” was greenlit, hit theaters in February. It ended up being 1974’s biggest hit, and provided the one-two punch that sent Wilder’s career into the comedy stratosphere.

And what was it like for Gruskoff to follow the Peruvian oddball odyssey of “Last Movie” and partner with Brooks to bring “Young Frankenstein” to mega-hit life? Words fail the garrulous Gruskoff so he turns to song, warbling to Brooks across the table: “Night and Day, you are the one …” Mel Brooks does not claim to be able sing Cole Porter better than Gruskoff, so we move on.


Mel Brooks announces Young Frankenstein book -- EW exclusive
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Favorite Mel Brooks Film

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:51 am

'Spaceballs' at 30: Bill Pullman Says Crew Worried Blue Screen Would Make Them Go Blind
"Mel used to do these power naps where he'd lay down for just five minutes, and I have never seen anything like the spirit that would return to him," the actor recalls.
Ryan Parker wrote:As the beloved Star Wars spoof turns 30 (June 24), Pullman granted The Hollywood Reporter an in-depth interview to discuss his zany adventure of working with Brooks, the late John Candy's frustrations with his costume and how Pullman's makeup artist scolded him for not acting like a star, among other cherished memories.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Previous

Return to Director Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron