The Official Disney Thread

Anime, cartoons and 3D. Animated shorts and features. And don't forget the animation genius in Bulgaria.

Postby Leckomaniac on Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:34 pm

Well I live in the midwest and I think Cars looks horrible. Gosh don't get me started on NASCAR. WTF, honestly?
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Postby MiltonWaddams on Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:54 pm

Eisner needs to fucking go, now, and whoever else in charge of Disney at the moment.

I know what they could do, sequels to classic movies, where they barely change the story. Little Mermaid 2, they just did the movie in reverse.
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Postby Chairman Kaga on Tue Feb 07, 2006 3:28 pm

MiltonWaddams wrote:Eisner needs to fucking go, now, and whoever else in charge of Disney at the moment.

I know what they could do, sequels to classic movies, where they barely change the story. Little Mermaid 2, they just did the movie in reverse.

Eisner is long gone. Lasseter, Jobs and Catmull are are actually now directly in charge of Disney animation.

http://news.awn.com/index.php?ltype=top&newsitem_n o=15996
New Disney Toon Committee Features Three From Pixar

January 27, 2006



More details of the Walt Disney-Pixar merger have become public via the company’s SEC filing on Jan. 26, 2006. Pixar’s Steve Jobs, John Lasseter and Ed Catmull will sit on a committee with Disney’s ceo Bob Iger, Disney Studios chairman Dick Cook and Disney cfo Tom Staggs to oversee all the feature animation at the company. Lasseter, who will report to Iger directly, will have greenlight power, subject to the approval of the committee, which will work out R&D and budget issues. The committee will meet once a month at Pixar’s headquarters in Emeryville, California.

Most importantly, Pixar will be able to run its operations as it has previously, including how its employees are contracted and compensated. Previous Pixar releases will keep their original copyright language, but future releases after CARS will hold a Disney Pixar copyright. In addition, in what is a very symbolic detail, the Pixar sign that adorns the studios in Emeryville will retain unchanged.

One of the key stipulations to insuring the deal is that the key Pixar staff must remain at the studio at least through the merger, which should be completed this summer. This includes the company’s key directors Brad Bird, Andrew Stanton and Pete Docter. Even the unexpected death of one of the key players was mentioned as a stipulation. If for some reason, Pixar decides to back away from the agreement, they will be obligated to pay Disney $210 million.
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Postby Nachokoolaid on Tue Feb 07, 2006 4:35 pm

Chairman Kaga wrote:I bet ToyStory 3 is a total rewrite......I don't see the problem considering Toy Story 2 was vastly superior to Toy Story.


The same way that Alien Vs. Predator was vastly superior to Aliens.
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Postby Chairman Kaga on Tue Feb 07, 2006 5:32 pm

Why the disdain for Toy Story 2?
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Postby Peven on Wed May 10, 2006 8:00 am

latest news regarding how Disney is ruini....er..running Pixar, from over at comingsoon.net...........


"Toy Story 3 is in Production
Source: Business Week, Bloomberg May 10, 2006


The Walt Disney Company reported its second quarter and six months results on Tuesday (full details here) and Chief Executive Robert Iger also gave an update on Toy Story 3 in a conference call.

Iger revealed that Walt Disney Pictures has started production on Toy Story 3, but no release date has been set for the third installment. The studio may also do other sequels of Pixar films.

After Disney acquired Pixar, Pixar took over production of Toy Story 3, which Disney's in-house animators had been working on."



uh oh, THIS is just the kind of thing i was worried about when Disney gobbled up Pixar. as i said in a post above,

"never say die with a franchise as bankable as Toy Story, and they can say what they want about Pixar being the one to make the call, but i think this is the first sign of Disney's infection of Pixar. next we'll see plans for Finding Nemo Jr, The Incredibles II, etc, as Disney turns Pixar into their own little whore. goodbye originality and creativity, hello to the Disney bean-counter mentality."
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Postby austenandrews on Wed May 10, 2006 10:20 am

Isn't Jobs one of Disney's biggest shareholders now? That's serious clout for John Lasseter. I'm more than willing to give Pixar the benefit of the doubt. No streak lasts forever. If they stumble, I believe they'll do it on their own accord, taking their own risks. Frankly I'm willing to accept a "merely good" (a la Bug's Life/Monsters Inc.) Pixar sequel if it frees Lasseter to work his magic with Disney's cel animation. I drool over the thought of a balls-out Miyazaki-type animated film with Pixar's stamp on the characters, pacing and American sensibilities.
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed May 10, 2006 10:35 am

Monsters Inc is great, enough of this "merely good" tosh. Billy Crystal, John Goodman, sparkling script. 'Nuff said! Agreed on Bugs Life though... Antz won me over more, possibly the only Dreamworks animation that has soul over gags.

BTW Lasseter has always expressed interest in creating a 2D animation to show it's still viable. Here's hopin'. Certainly won't be Miyazaki, though... it'd be a different animal.

...

... no more animals... please...
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Postby austenandrews on Wed May 10, 2006 11:31 am

Well, I put "merely good" in quotes for a reason. Personally I like Monsters Inc. better than most Pixar films, because it pushes my buttons more than most. But in general it's not regarded as one of their best. (Which is high praise, of course. When your worst film is A Bug's Life, which is at least as good as most Disney animation of the last decade, you know you're cooking.)

Miyazaki-Lasseter is the easy connection to make, but I only mention it to point out how different Lasseter's 2D films might differ from the usual Disney fare. Personally I think he should push for technical innovation in 2D at least as much as they've pushed CG. There's no reason 2D animation can't offer as rich a visual experience as 3D (cf. Miyazaki), even though cel animation houses seem to want to work on the cheap anymore.
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed May 10, 2006 11:32 am

Correction - cel animation houses have no choice but to work on the cheap because of the budget's they're given. ;) Producers nowadays seem to think cutting corners for budgetary purposes is a good thing.
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Postby Peven on Wed May 10, 2006 11:42 am

people said that Lasseter would be in control so we wouldn't have to worry about Disney simply mining what Pixar had already done by churning out sequels. that terrible idea of making a Toy Story 3 would be put to rest now that Lasseter was running the show, they said. now that it is revealed that is EXACTLY what Disney is planning, a Toy Story 3 already in the works, and sequels to the other movies in the Pixar library. now i am told i am supposed to believe that yea, ok, they ARE doing the sequel thing BUT Lasseter will make sure they are done well. how many times does that line get pushed back before people take off the rose colored glasses and realize what happens when a corporate behemoth like Disney gets a hold of a small creative company like Pixar who developed their movies based on story quality first and foremost, not some demographic research indicating where they could make the most $ in licensing deals, or some other beaurocratic corporate business plan mentality?
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Postby Chairman Kaga on Wed May 10, 2006 11:57 am

Peven sorry but you are way off. Creative control of those properties is one of the contractual stipulations of the buyout. I bet that whatever story Disney had going for TS3 has been scrapped and replaced with something approved by Lasseter, Jobs et al.
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed May 10, 2006 12:15 pm

Kind of a chicken-and-egg thing, if you ask me. But I bet if you audited the big animation studios, most of their technical innovation in the last five or ten years has involved digital cost-cutting. Whereas if someone turned out a 2D piece as visually innovative as The Incredibles, they could well float the whole 2D industry a few feet higher.


Inversely the risk is that it bombs, and the suits use that as proof that cel animation isn't worth the cost.
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Postby austenandrews on Wed May 10, 2006 12:20 pm

AtomicHyperbole wrote:Correction - cel animation houses have no choice but to work on the cheap because of the budget's they're given. ;) Producers nowadays seem to think cutting corners for budgetary purposes is a good thing.

Kind of a chicken-and-egg thing, if you ask me. But I bet if you audited the big animation studios, most of their technical innovation in the last five or ten years has involved digital cost-cutting. Whereas if someone turned out a 2D piece as visually innovative as The Incredibles, they could well float the whole 2D industry a few feet higher.

Peven wrote:now i am told i am supposed to believe that yea, ok, they ARE doing the sequel thing BUT Lasseter will make sure they are done well. how many times does that line get pushed back before people take off the rose colored glasses and realize what happens when a corporate behemoth like Disney gets a hold of a small creative company like Pixar who developed their movies based on story quality first and foremost, not some demographic research indicating where they could make the most $ in licensing deals, or some other beaurocratic corporate business plan mentality?

Disney will always do that to some degree, because Disney is a mega-corporation. Pixar didn't exist in a vacuum and was always a part of that system. They wouldn't be where they are without the support of the Disney machine. Sure, going forward Lasseter & co. will inevitably be influenced by larger corporate concerns. But the truth is, that would have happened no matter who they signed a deal with. And frankly their deal is as sweet as any deal anyone has ever signed.

One thing I always tell people is that they shouldn't get stressed out because Disney releases a DTV Bambi 2 or 101 Dalmations 3 or whatever. Don't be fooled by marketing ploys. Those videos aren't part of the cycle of major film releases any more than the Buzz Lightyear cartoon is part of Pixar's feature library. They're just merchandising. A Bambi DTV shouldn't upset animation fans any more than a Bambi TV show or coloring book. Many Pixar sequels may well turn out to be the same thing. It's just part of how the system funds the real deal features.
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Postby austenandrews on Wed May 10, 2006 12:28 pm

AtomicHyperbole wrote:Inversely the risk is that it bombs, and the suits use that as proof that cel animation isn't worth the cost.

That's why it's so sweet that guys like Lasseter and Jobs are wearing suits now.
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Postby Ribbons on Tue Apr 08, 2008 7:59 pm

Well, Disney's released a projection of their animated movies from now until 2012. Seems like a pretty healthy mix of traditional and 3D animation (and an alarming amount of DTV Tinkerbell movies :? ) I'm not sure if there's a pattern to be found in here, but I figured it was newsworthy anyway. Several interesting projects named, like the long-delayed Rapunzel movie, Cars 2, and a Disney film based on a Philip K. Dick story.

2008:

TINKER BELL (Disney DVD and Blu-ray Release Date: October 28th, 2008)
DisneyToon Studios
Director: Bradley Raymond
Producer: Jeannine Roussel

Enter the magical world of fairies and meet the enchanting creatures of Pixie Hollow, who "nurture nature" and bring about the change of the seasons. Changing the colors of the leaves, moving a sunbeam to melt snow, waking animals from their winter slumber, or giving a patch of sproutlings a sprinkle of water are all within the realm of these seasonal specialists. Tinker Bell thinks her fairy talent as a "tinker" isn't as special or important as the other fairies' talents. But when Tink tries to change who she is, she creates nothing but disaster! With encouragement from her friends Rosetta, Silvermist, Fawn and Iridessa, Tink learns the key to solving her problems lies in her unique tinker abilities ... and discovers that when she's true to herself, magical things can happen.


2009:

UP (Domestic Release Date: May 29th, 2009, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Pete Docter
Co-Director: Bob Peterson
Producer: Jonas Rivera
Writer: Bob Peterson
Voice Talent: Ed Asner, Christopher Plummer, John Ratzenberger, Jordan Nagai

From the Academy Award®-nominated team of director Pete Docter ("Monsters, Inc.") and co-director Bob Peterson comes "Up," a comedic adventure taking off (and lifting spirits) in summer 2009. Carl Fredricksen spent his entire life dreaming of exploring the globe and experiencing life to its fullest. But at age 78, life seems to have passed him by, until a twist of fate (and a persistent 8-year old Wilderness Explorer named Russell) gives him a new lease on life. "Up" takes audiences on a thrilling journey where the unlikely pair encounter wild terrain, unexpected villains and jungle creatures. When seeking adventure next summer -- look "Up."

TOY STORY in 3-D (Domestic Release Date: October 2nd, 2009)
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: John Lasseter
Producers: Ralph Guggenheim, Bonnie Arnold
Composer: Randy Newman
Voice Talent: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles, Jim Varney, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger

Originally released by Walt Disney Pictures in 1995, "Toy Story" was the first feature film from Pixar Animation Studios and director John Lasseter. The film went on to receive Oscar® nominations for Best Original Score, Best Original Song, and Best Original Screenplay, and earned Lasseter a Special Achievement Award (Oscar®) "for the development and inspired application of techniques that have made possible the first feature-length computer-animated film." The 3-D version of this landmark film is being personally overseen by Lasseter with his acclaimed team of technical wizards handling all the necessary steps in the conversion process.

THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2009)
Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: John Musker, Ron Clements
Producer: Peter Del Vecho
Composer: Randy Newman
Voice Talent: Anika Noni Rose, Keith David, Jenifer Lewis, John Goodman

A musical set in the greatest city of them all, New Orleans, "The Princess and the Frog" marks Disney's return to the timeless art form of traditional animation. The film teams Ron Clements and John Musker, creators of "The Little Mermaid" and "Aladdin," with Oscar®-winning composer Randy Newman to tell the most beautiful love story ever told ... with frogs, voodoo, and a singing alligator.

TINKER BELL NORTH OF NEVER LAND - working title (Disney DVD and Blu-ray Release Date: 2009)

DisneyToon Studios
Director: Klay Hall
Producer: Sean Lurie

In autumn, Tinker Bell is entrusted with crafting a great treasure that can rejuvenate the Pixie Dust Tree. But when her friend Terence offers to help, Tink's temper and stubbornness get the better of her, shattering both her creation and her friendship with Terence. To set things right again, she must embark on a journey far North of Never Land ... and along the way, she will discover an even greater treasure.


2010:

TOY STORY 2 in 3-D (Domestic Release Date: February 12th, 2010)
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: John Lasseter
Co-Directors: Lee Unkrich, Ash Brannon
Producers: Helene Plotkin, Karen Robert Jackson
Composer: Randy Newman
Voice Talent: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Kelsey Grammer, Don Rickles, Estelle Harris, Jim Varney, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger

Originally released in 1999, "Toy Story 2" went on to become one of the most popular animated features of all time. The film picks up as Andy is heading off to Cowboy Camp and the toys are left to their own devices. When an obsessive toy collector named Al McWhiggin (owner of Al's Toy Barn) kidnaps Woody, and Woody learns that he's a highly valued collectable from a 1950s TV show called "Woody's Roundup," the stage is set for a daring rescue attempt by the gang from Andy's room. The film introduced such other memorable characters from "Woody's Roundup" as Jessie the cowgirl, Bullseye the horse, and the Prospector.

TOY STORY 3 (Domestic Release Date: June 18th, 2010, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))

Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Lee Unkrich
Producer: Darla K. Anderson
Writer: Michael Arndt
Composer: Randy Newman
Voice Talent: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Don Rickles, Wallace Shawn, Estelle Harris, John Ratzenberger, Ned Beatty

The creators of the beloved "Toy Story" films re-open the toy box and bring moviegoers back to the delightful world of Woody, Buzz and our favorite gang of toy characters in "Toy Story 3." Lee Unkrich (co-director of "Toy Story 2" and "Finding Nemo") directs this highly anticipated film, and Michael Arndt, the Academy Award®-winning screenwriter of "Little Miss Sunshine," brings his unique talents and comedic sensibilities to the proceedings.

RAPUNZEL (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2010, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: Glen Keane, Dean Wellins
Producer: Roy Conli

In this new telling of the classic fairy tale, "Rapunzel," audiences will be transported to a stunning CG fantasy world complete with the iconic tower, an evil witch, a gallant hero and, of course, the mysterious girl with the long golden tresses. Expect adventure, heart, humor, and hair ... lots of hair, when Rapunzel unleashes her locks in theaters for the 2010 holiday.

TINKER BELL A MIDSUMMER STORM - working title (Disney DVD and Blu-ray Release Date: 2010)

DisneyToon Studios
Director: Carolyn Gair
Producer: Margot Pipkin

After being confronted by her antagonist Vidia, an irritated Tinker Bell retaliates by taking a photograph of Vidia ... without considering the consequences. Now, the two must set aside their differences and cooperate to prevent evidence of the existence of fairies from falling into human hands.


2011:

NEWT (Domestic Release Date: Summer 2011, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Gary Rydstrom
Producer: Richard Hollander
Writers: Gary Rydstrom, Leslie Caveny

What happens when the last remaining male and female blue-footed newts on the planet are forced together by science to save the species, and they can't stand each other? That's the problem facing Newt and Brooke, heroes of "newt," the Pixar film by seven-time Academy Award® winner for sound Gary Rydstrom, and director of Pixar's Oscar-nominated short, "Lifted." Newt and Brooke embark on a perilous, unpredictable adventure and discover that finding a mate never goes as planned, even when you only have one choice. Love, it turns out, is not a science.

THE BEAR AND THE BOW (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2011, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))

Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Brenda Chapman
Producer: Katherine Sarafian
Voice Talent: Reese Witherspoon, Billy Connolly, Emma Thompson

A rugged and mythic Scotland is the setting for Pixar's action-adventure "The Bear and the Bow." The impetuous, tangle-haired Merida, though a daughter of royalty, would prefer to make her mark as a great archer. A clash of wills with her mother compels Merida to make a reckless choice, which unleashes unintended peril on her father's kingdom and her mother's life. Merida struggles with the unpredictable forces of nature, magic and a dark, ancient curse to set things right. Director Brenda Chapman ("The Prince of Egypt," "The Lion King") and the storytelling wizards of Pixar conjure humor, fantasy and excitement in this rich Highland tale.

TINKER BELL A WINTER STORY - working title (Disney DVD and Blu-ray Release Date: 2011)

DisneyToon Studios

Producer: Sean Lurie

The fourth, as-yet-untold story of Tinker Bell and her fairy friends will take place in winter, completing the cycle of the seasons.


2012:

CARS 2 (Domestic Release Date: Summer 2012, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Brad Lewis

All the world's a racetrack as racing superstar Lightning McQueen zooms back into action, with his best friend Mater in tow, to take on the globe's fastest and finest in this thrilling high-octane new installment of the "Cars" saga. Mater and McQueen will need their passports as they find themselves in a new world of intrigue, thrills and fast-paced comedic escapades around the globe. "Cars 2" is being directed by Brad Lewis, producer of the Oscar®- winning film "Ratatouille."

KING OF THE ELVES (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2012, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))

Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: Aaron Blaise, Robert Walker
Producer: Chuck Williams

Legendary storyteller Phillip K. Dick's short story (his only experiment in the fantasy genre) becomes the basis for this fantastic and imaginative tale about an average man living in the Mississippi Delta, whose reluctant actions to help a desperate band of elves leads them to name him their new king. Joining the innocent and endangered elves as they attempt to escape from an evil and menacing troll, their unlikely new leader finds himself caught on a journey filled with unimaginable dangers and a chance to bring real meaning back to his own life.
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Tue Apr 08, 2008 8:06 pm

Is disney's traditional animation dead wrt feature films?

THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2009)
Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: John Musker, Ron Clements
Producer: Peter Del Vecho
Composer: Randy Newman
Voice Talent: Anika Noni Rose, Keith David, Jenifer Lewis, John Goodman

A musical set in the greatest city of them all, New Orleans, "The Princess and the Frog" marks Disney's return to the timeless art form of traditional animation. The film teams Ron Clements and John Musker, creators of "The Little Mermaid" and "Aladdin," with Oscar®-winning composer Randy Newman to tell the most beautiful love story ever told ... with frogs, voodoo, and a singing alligator.


Looks like we'll find out at xmas 2009. The music is key. With New Orleans as a backdrop they could do some cool stuff with this, musically.

Ribbons wrote:
KING OF THE ELVES (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2012, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))

Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: Aaron Blaise, Robert Walker
Producer: Chuck Williams

Legendary storyteller Phillip K. Dick's short story (his only experiment in the fantasy genre) becomes the basis for this fantastic and imaginative tale about an average man living in the Mississippi Delta, whose reluctant actions to help a desperate band of elves leads them to name him their new king. Joining the innocent and endangered elves as they attempt to escape from an evil and menacing troll, their unlikely new leader finds himself caught on a journey filled with unimaginable dangers and a chance to bring real meaning back to his own life.


They'd better release this before december 21!! :shock:
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Tue Apr 08, 2008 8:15 pm

Word from insiders is that no, traditional animation NEVER died. Eisner proclaimed it dead and killed off his traditional animation arms only to find himself dead in the water not too long after.

A good film is a good film is a good film. The old standards still get reeled out year after year by Disney themselves and sell by the bucketload. Why? They're amazingly beautiful from the script to the visuals. 3D bombs such as Chicken Little and Dinosaur have shown that audiences simply aren't interested in just one style of animation repeated ad infinitum. Plus the sudden surge in popularity of accessible Japanese animation shows that consumers are interested in just more than childrens cartoons as well as 2D.

The recent Ratatouiile DVD showcased some lovely 2D work on the history of rats extra. What with Pixar's John Lasseter involved now, you'll be seeing more 2D in the future... and thank fuck for that.

edit - I know of THREE BIG (as in budget) traditionally animated films here in the UK alone being created now, two of which have been only going in the last six months. Woohoo!

... oh and I turned one down. AGH. Long story.
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Postby Seppuku on Tue Apr 08, 2008 8:19 pm

Lord Voldemoo wrote:
Ribbons wrote:
KING OF THE ELVES (Domestic Release Date: Christmas 2012, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))

Walt Disney Animation Studios
Directors: Aaron Blaise, Robert Walker
Producer: Chuck Williams

Legendary storyteller Phillip K. Dick's short story (his only experiment in the fantasy genre) becomes the basis for this fantastic and imaginative tale about an average man living in the Mississippi Delta, whose reluctant actions to help a desperate band of elves leads them to name him their new king. Joining the innocent and endangered elves as they attempt to escape from an evil and menacing troll, their unlikely new leader finds himself caught on a journey filled with unimaginable dangers and a chance to bring real meaning back to his own life.


They'd better release this before december 21!! :shock:


IMAYANILASH!

I never thought I'd read about a Disney adaptation of a Philip K Dick story... Thanks for posting that, Ribs.
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Tue Apr 08, 2008 8:24 pm

I know of one Disney toon not mentioned in that list, but can't for the life of me remember what the carp it was called.

Besides I'm not entirely sure I'm at liberty to say what it is even if I could remember. It may come as a suprise to some quarters.

Good times.
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Postby Fievel on Tue Apr 08, 2008 9:26 pm

Disney does Dick.

Love it.
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Postby CeeBeeUK on Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:17 am

AtomicHyperbole wrote:I know of one Disney toon not mentioned in that list, but can't for the life of me remember what the carp it was called.

Besides I'm not entirely sure I'm at liberty to say what it is even if I could remember. It may come as a suprise to some quarters.

Good times.


Was Gnomeo and Juliet a Disney film? The guy that wrote the Bunny Suicides books has been listing that as a project for ages :?
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:33 am

Even if I knew I don't think I could really give out that info. Mainly because I know some peeps at Disney and frankly I wouldn't mind working with them in future.

Sorry!
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Postby RogueScribner on Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:40 am

Wasn't that picked up by Miramax? Owned by Disney, but still, I don't think it's an official Disney animated release.
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Postby CeeBeeUK on Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:46 am

AtomicHyperbole wrote:Even if I knew I don't think I could really give out that info. Mainly because I know some peeps at Disney and frankly I wouldn't mind working with them in future.

Sorry!


Wasn't expecting you to AH ;) It was more of a rhetorical question, or a prompt to see if it was the film name you had forgotten! :D

Andy Riley (Bunny Suicide author) has had it listed as an 'upcoming' Disney release in his books for years, and it seemed strange that it wasn't on their list for the next three years.

RS might have answered that though.
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Postby LaDracul on Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:20 am

Sounds like that they're taking the plot of the "Mater-National" video game for "Cars"...

Although if we get the characters from that game to show up in it, it would be pretty cool...

(Man, I need to play that game...)

And since I have a little niece (And still desire to work at a Disney park as a face character), MORE Disney Princesses is great. :) And at least they got Reese Witherspoon for SOMETHING.
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Postby LeFlambeur on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:17 pm

AtomicHyperbole wrote:The recent Ratatouiile DVD showcased some lovely 2D work on the history of rats extra. What with Pixar's John Lasseter involved now, you'll be seeing more 2D in the future... and thank fuck for that.


I'm not so sure. If the digital 3-D format they seem intent on pushing becomes the standard, I have to question what place traditional cell animation is going to have. Especially since Disney and Pixar are often responsible for childrens first experiences in the theater, I suspect that the first generation exposed to it may come to expect 3-D in everything they see.
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:28 pm

LeFlambeur wrote:
AtomicHyperbole wrote:The recent Ratatouiile DVD showcased some lovely 2D work on the history of rats extra. What with Pixar's John Lasseter involved now, you'll be seeing more 2D in the future... and thank fuck for that.


I'm not so sure. If the digital 3-D format they seem intent on pushing becomes the standard, I have to question what place traditional cell animation is going to have. Especially since Disney and Pixar are often responsible for childrens first experiences in the theater, I suspect that the first generation exposed to it may come to expect 3-D in everything they see.


3D is being pushed, but suprise suprise... you could also do 2D trad in 3D if you wanted to. 3D has been around in one form or another for donkeys years - the simple fact is I very, very VERY highly doubt it'll take off as the main source of entertainment. It's expensive to make for one thing, plus people like simplicity. It'll gain in popularity but I can't see it overtaking 2D moviemaking in any real context.

Like HD, is another format people are going to be telling us we need for years before it becomes anything like a viable threat to other media presentation. HD, now, I can see a point in because it's just a simple boost in fidelity. But having every single piece of entertainment produced to give a fake feeling of depth? Please.

Question away. Whilst you're doing so everyone else will be enjoying a true artform that's as viable and beautiful to watch now as it was when it first appeared.
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Postby Pacino86845 on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:33 pm

Hmmm, good points on both sides... but maybe 2D animation will go the way of black-and-white films? That is to say, small art-house or foreign films will still pop up in that inexpensive format, but the bulk of it will be in 3D. Kids' films need to be mainstream in order to turn in a profit... there aren't like 8-year-old beatniks going on the internet posting about how Surf's Up sucks and panders to the lowest common denominator. Rather, kids see penguins, in 3D, they get all wowed and awed and whatnot, and they get their parents to take 'em.
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:38 pm

Pacino86845 wrote:Hmmm, good points on both sides... but maybe 2D animation will go the way of black-and-white films? That is to say, small art-house or foreign films will still pop up in that inexpensive format, but the bulk of it will be in 3D. Kids' films need to be mainstream in order to turn in a profit... there aren't like 8-year-old beatniks going on the internet posting about how Surf's Up sucks and panders to the lowest common denominator. Rather, kids see penguins, in 3D, they get all wowed and awed and whatnot, and they get their parents to take 'em.


I'm farrrrr from knowledgable about the business side of animated films, but this is what I expect to happen as well. It seems to me to be only common sense. I don't think 3-D animation is a fad, and with respect to mainstream children's animated feature films I'm not sure there is room for both types of animation to share the limelight equally.

Just as an example of how ignorant I am on the subject, though....what's more expensive at this point, computer-generated 3-d animation or traditional 2-d cell-shaded animation? I would expect that the former would still be, but the latter must be more labor intensive, isn't it?
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Postby Seppuku on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:40 pm

So AH, are you old enough to get redundancy pay? :wink:
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:41 pm

If 2D was going to die, it would've been dead near ten years ago when Eisner declared it dead whilst simltanously releasing the joyous wonder of Lilo and Stitch and preceding to ruin the entire Disney back-catalogue with cheaply made tat. Which still made money.

2D animation is a STYLE. Like any other style it'll go in and out of fashion, but simply put it's all about graphic art. And graphic art surrounds us. You can't do in 3D what 2D can do, you can emulate it but that's it - it's just not the same, nor easy to produce.

Kids generally see anything cute, cuddly, colourful, beautifully made, engrossing - they're going to love it. The whole 2D/3D/4D thing exists only in adult minds. A 6 yeear old girl will likely get equally as much joy out of a 3D Disney Princess as she will a Kiki's Delivery Service.

We're always too eager to jump onto the new. But simply put, what matters is good films and what feels right when you see it, the style that's being presented. Lasseter has it right because this is the way he sees it - he saw 2D being declared dead and left behind, but on the other hand he also saw the beauty in it and wanted to keep it alive. Not PURELY as an artform, but because simply entertainment, as life, needs variety.

If anything the only thing the glut of 3D movies did was take away that variety and only left the great standing. Any that might've had a chance if they didn't look or emulate other pictures by having a style seperate them didn't.

(Incidentally, Pacino, movie quality 2D costs the same as 3D - it's not a lesser expensive cousin by any stretch)

Variety is the spice of life and the soul of entertainment.
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:43 pm

seppukudkurosawa wrote:So AH, are you old enough to get redundancy pay? :wink:


Bwahahaha.

I'm a concept illustrator/storyboard artist. Others do the animation. Fortunately the skills you pick up doing what I do are transferable.

Besides I'm a freelancer. Redundancy pay is for the masses...

/sobs
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:47 pm

Lord Voldemoo wrote:
Pacino86845 wrote:Hmmm, good points on both sides... but maybe 2D animation will go the way of black-and-white films? That is to say, small art-house or foreign films will still pop up in that inexpensive format, but the bulk of it will be in 3D. Kids' films need to be mainstream in order to turn in a profit... there aren't like 8-year-old beatniks going on the internet posting about how Surf's Up sucks and panders to the lowest common denominator. Rather, kids see penguins, in 3D, they get all wowed and awed and whatnot, and they get their parents to take 'em.


I'm farrrrr from knowledgable about the business side of animated films, but this is what I expect to happen as well. It seems to me to be only common sense. I don't think 3-D animation is a fad, and with respect to mainstream children's animated feature films I'm not sure there is room for both types of animation to share the limelight equally.

Just as an example of how ignorant I am on the subject, though....what's more expensive at this point, computer-generated 3-d animation or traditional 2-d cell-shaded animation? I would expect that the former would still be, but the latter must be more labor intensive, isn't it?


I can ask someone for you but I seem to recall it being pretty much even. There's a lot of difference in 2D and 3D (models don't need to be built in 2D, for example) but as I said above, movie-quality 2D is as expensive to create.

By the way, we're getting confused between 3D/2D here. I'm also talking about 3D via way of the illusion of depth, which is what I was assuming LeFlambeur was additionally talking about. My mistake!

3D isn't a fad, in as much as 2D isn't a fad. The two STYLES can sit together quite comfortably. The only reason we're having this conversation is because some utter gentleman called Eisner declared it dead, closed down his 2D studios and shot himself in the foot.
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Postby Seppuku on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:51 pm

I really hope that 2D animation comes back in again! All it would really take is one or two well-written 2d Disney movies back to back, and it'll be right on top again.

The fact that most 3D cartoons shown on telly have ended up bombing (I'm thinking of that lion program starring John Goodman in particular) leaves me thinking that the medium it's presented in isn't anywhere near as important as how well made it is.

Vive le planéité!

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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:56 pm

seppukudkurosawa wrote:The fact that most 3D cartoons shown on telly have ended up bombing (I'm thinking of that lion program starring John Goodman in particular) leaves me thinking that the medium it's presented in isn't anywhere near as important as how well made it is.


Read this out aloud. It's the sound of someone hitting the nail very, very squarely on the head.

You get a big motherfucking +1 with extra creamy goodness and sprinklin's.
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Postby LeFlambeur on Wed Apr 09, 2008 1:21 pm

First of all just to be clear when I say 3-D, I mean illusion of depth 3-D. Which is what stuck out for me looking at Pixars upcoming releases.

AtomicHyperbole wrote:3D is being pushed, but suprise suprise... you could also do 2D trad in 3D if you wanted to. 3D has been around in one form or another for donkeys years - the simple fact is I very, very VERY highly doubt it'll take off as the main source of entertainment. It's expensive to make for one thing, plus people like simplicity. It'll gain in popularity but I can't see it overtaking 2D moviemaking in any real context.


I hope you're right. 3-D can expand certain possibilties in visual storytelling, but it will also aid Hollywood hegemony, as those with money will be the only ones with the resources to produce 3-D works. I think I'll have to see something in 3-D one of these days in order to gauge its potential; whether or not it will be the biggest thing since color (as some are talking it up as) or another gimick.

AtomicHyperbole wrote:Question away. Whilst you're doing so everyone else will be enjoying a true artform that's as viable and beautiful to watch now as it was when it first appeared.


Don't get me wrong, I like cell based 2-D animation, I prefer it. I'm speculating about general trends in our current film culture, not discussing personal taste.
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 2:54 pm

I thought you did.

Again, if 3D was going to take off it would've done.

Actually, HOW does it increase storytelling? I'm intrigued by that statement. Does it add to how you can tell a story other than putting things in yo' face? Hardly. It's moviemaking as experience, as a rollercoaster ride.

It's hard not to see it as anything other than a gimmick, other than to maybe increase realism in documentaries (something Cameron has already done, admirably).
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Wed Apr 09, 2008 2:57 pm

now i'm confused again as to what "type" of 3D we are talking about...
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:25 pm

I don't know because you could do 2D in 3D should you wish.
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Postby Ribbons on Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:31 pm

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Postby Chairman Kaga on Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:39 pm

AtomicHyperbole wrote:Does it add to how you can tell a story other than putting things in yo' face? Hardly.

It actually does change framing relationships etc but I don't know if that necessarily changes how you tell story.
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Postby LeFlambeur on Wed Apr 09, 2008 5:30 pm

Chairman Kaga wrote:
AtomicHyperbole wrote:Does it add to how you can tell a story other than putting things in yo' face? Hardly.

It actually does change framing relationships etc but I don't know if that necessarily changes how you tell story.


Right, I think allowing the filmmakers to create a realistic sense of depth, would alter the movie aesthetics slightly, thus "expanding certain possiblities" by giving filmmakers a new tool or element to work with.
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Postby LaDracul on Wed Apr 09, 2008 7:28 pm

Some more details on "The Bear and the Bow"-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bear_and_the_Bow
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Postby AtomicHyperbole on Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:23 pm

LeFlambeur wrote:
Chairman Kaga wrote:
AtomicHyperbole wrote:Does it add to how you can tell a story other than putting things in yo' face? Hardly.

It actually does change framing relationships etc but I don't know if that necessarily changes how you tell story.


Right, I think allowing the filmmakers to create a realistic sense of depth, would alter the movie aesthetics slightly, thus "expanding certain possiblities" by giving filmmakers a new tool or element to work with.


Well, if you purely mean make the visual language ever so slightly different, then yes to a small degree. It's basicaly focus tricks. You're still essentially viewing a 2D screen, it's not like a computer game where you are manipulating a 3D world thus bringing up all sorts of issues when trying to create a visual narrative.

You're simply more likely to use foreground/background elements moreso than anything else.
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Postby TonyWilson on Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:32 pm

Theoretically though, 3D could be pushed to film a complete 3d 360 degree action sequence for example. The Wachowskis attempted something similar (but 2D of course) with the freeway chase in Reloaded. But I'd love to something like a Tony Jaa fight filmed in the 3D/360 manner.
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CARS 2

Postby TheButcher on Wed Sep 24, 2008 2:32 pm

Ribbons wrote:Well, Disney's released a projection of their animated movies from now until 2012. Seems like a pretty healthy mix of traditional and 3D animation (and an alarming amount of DTV Tinkerbell movies :? ) I'm not sure if there's a pattern to be found in here, but I figured it was newsworthy anyway. Several interesting projects named, like the long-delayed Rapunzel movie, Cars 2, and a Disney film based on a Philip K. Dick story.

2012:

CARS 2 (Domestic Release Date: Summer 2012, Disney Digital 3-D(TM))
Pixar Animation Studios
Director: Brad Lewis

All the world's a racetrack as racing superstar Lightning McQueen zooms back into action, with his best friend Mater in tow, to take on the globe's fastest and finest in this thrilling high-octane new installment of the "Cars" saga. Mater and McQueen will need their passports as they find themselves in a new world of intrigue, thrills and fast-paced comedic escapades around the globe. "Cars 2" is being directed by Brad Lewis, producer of the Oscar®- winning film "Ratatouille."

From THR.com: 'Cars 2' racing to theaters with 2011 date
Disney moves up release of the animated sequel
By Borys Kit

Sept 24, 2008, 02:09 PM ET
Pixar is pushing the pedal to the metal on its sequel "Cars 2."

The follow-up to John Lasseter's 2006 film "Cars" was originally set for release in summer 2012, but Lasseter, Pixar's chief creative officer said at a Disney presentation Wednesday, that the film has been moved up to a 2011 release.

Brad Lewis, who served as a producer on "Antz" and "Ratatouille," is directing the film, which Lasseter said takes its inspiration from cars from around the world that he saw while doing publicity tours on behalf of "Cars."

In the meantime, Pixar will keep the "Cars" engine humming with a series of animated shorts that it will dub "Cars Toons" -- the first is titled "Mater's Tall Tales," taking its title from the name of the character played by Larry the Cable Guy.

The "Cars Toons" will play on the Disney Channel and also might screen theatrically.
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Re: Disney buys Pixar for 7.4b (Disney schedule through 2012)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Sep 26, 2008 8:00 am

From /film: Pixar’s Newt Gets Cars 2’s Old Release Date
Yesterday when we told you that Cars 2 had been moved forward to the Summer 2011, we forgot to tell you that Pixar’s Newt would be getting the old Cars 2 release date of Summer 2012. It wasn’t made clear why the change was made, but I’m assuming that newt probably required more development time, while all the characters of Cars have already been designed, cutting down the traditional pre-production timeline.

newt marks the directing debut of multiple Academy Award winning sound designer Gary Rydstrom, who made his Pixar debut with the short film Lifted (which premiered in front of Ratatouille). The plot synopsis that was released earlier this years follows: “What happens when the last remaining male and female blue-footed newts on the planet are forced together by science to save the species, and they can’t stand each other? Newt and Brooke embark on a perilous, unpredictable adventure and discover that finding a mate never goes as planned, even when you only have one choice. Love, it turns out, is not a science.”
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Is Pixar Going to Make Monsters Inc 2?

Postby TheButcher on Sat Feb 28, 2009 2:32 pm

From /film:
Peter Sciretta wrote:
Now a site called Blue Sky Disney is reporting that Pete Docter will start working on the sequel after he finishes Up, with tentative plans for a 2013 release. Now lets keep in mind that I’ve never ever heard of this BlueSkyDisney, and they don’t seem like a trusted news source. But everything I’ve heard on and off the record thus far points in the direction that Disney wants another Monsters Inc movie, and they want it in 2013/2014. Pete Docter will be at WonderCon over the weekend, and I’m sure someone will ask him about these rumors. But with no official announcement from the mousehouse, I’m betting we’ll get another answer like the one he gave MTV at Comic Con.




From Blue Sky Disney: Just What The Docter Ordered...

The rumors are true...

It appears that Pete Docter has settled on his next directing gig and the film project is a familiar one. While he likely won't be talking about it until his press junkets are through for "Up," the feature that he'll be working on(and has been for a while) is the sequel to "Monster's Inc." with tentative plans for it being Pixar's 2013 release.

You heard it here guys...


From The PIXAR Blog: 'Monsters' sequel in 2013?
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Re: Disney buys Pixar for 7.4b (Disney schedule through 2012)

Postby Evil Hobbit on Wed Mar 11, 2009 1:33 pm

Not realy a movie that needs a sequel hm?
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