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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:22 am
by The Todd
The Todd might be the only one here who feels this way, but my vote would be for Atlantis: The Lost Empire and Treasure Planet as my favorite Disney animated movies.

MOUSE-FIVE!!!!!

EDIT - Well, those two or Shawshank Redemption..... :wink:

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:26 am
by havocSchultz
The Todd wrote:The Todd might be the only one here who feels this way, but my vote would be for Atlantis: The Lost Empire and Treasure Planet as my favorite Disney animated movies.



Me too...

They were epic...

Re: Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:29 am
by MonkeyM666
TODD ....AHEM....

DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:It's a too bad about a Disney's "Atlantis: The Lost Empire" anna "Treasure Planet," eh? Both of a them relatively good a films, with a not a the musical number inna site, with a the lots of a the adventure anna even a some character deaths... anna they bomb inna the box office, eh?

"Treasure Planet," she was a the first-class uppa'grade to a the original RLS "Treasure Island," anna "Atlantis," she was a surely more epic inna scope than a most of a the kiddie-fare... but, the peoples? They wanna the singing animals making with a the funny, no?

Anna admittedly, the merchandising potential, she is a much a more potent with a the funny animals.

So Disney, she try to branch out anna make a the animation for a the slightly older audience, only to find a that she donna exist.



bastard_robo wrote:Of all the "CLASSIC" disney movies.. I think Robin Hood was the best...

after the 80s the quality kinda went down, except for Oliver and Co.

90's was a diffrent beast all together... Everything was a song and fucking dance number.. (ok.. Aladdin was probably the shining light of that time)

But I think these two movies during the "END" of the drawn age dont get the love they deserve..

Image
Image

These two were just fine animation filmmaking.. yet they both sunk at the Box Office.. and no one really gives them credit as good movies.. which they are..

But if we're talking cartoons... Like short animation...

The Mickey short where he fought the Giant is classic, as is the one were Donald, Mickey and Goofey work as Ghosthunters on Halloween.

as for regualr toons..

this is proably the best thing Disney ever did in their exsistance...

Image

Hands down the best Toon in ages... writing only compared to JLU..!

After that.. Proably Darkwing Duck.. that show was awesome..

I give props to Kim Possible too... of all the shit the Mouse dose on their channels.. this is a glimmer of light..


I'm a fan of Atlantis. I'm sure that I've mentioned it in another thread titled 'what's your fav. Disney cartoon' or something. The sequel for Atlantis was CRAP though... they changed the whole concept of the first film. great looking FX, and it's one flick that I'll always happily watch the morning after the night before waisted off my chops. :D

I don’t mind Treasure Planet, but it did destroy Disney animated features as we knew it, they spent WAY to much money on it for an animated piece, far too much money, $120 million or something like that. It does look cool though, and I own the DVD but I enjoy Titan A.E. more for an animated space adventure.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:32 am
by DinoDeLaurentiis
tapehead wrote:Yeah what a putz - to think he missed that post of Dino's... 15 months ago...


It's only onna the 2 pages before, eh? Holy crappa, donna any of a you putzes even a bother to read through a the threads anymore, eh? Especially iffa you gonna to bump a the old thread, no?

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:35 am
by tapehead
don't look at me - give The Todd some of that!

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:37 am
by godzillasushi
The Todd wrote:The Todd might be the only one here who feels this way, but my vote would be for Atlantis: The Lost Empire and Treasure Planet as my favorite Disney animated movies.

MOUSE-FIVE!!!!!

EDIT - Well, those two or Shawshank Redemption..... :wink:


Treasure Planet wasn't so awfully bad. It had some great parts.



@Robo, Darkwing Duck was quite funny. Do you remember Mighty Ducks? That was alright.

Still, we all know nothing touches the big three. Duck Tales, Tale Spin, and Rescue Rangers.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:39 am
by BuckyO'harre
godzillasushi wrote:Darkwing Duck . Duck Tales, Tale Spin, and Rescue Rangers.



I can still sing the theme songs to all of those...


*feels somewhat proud and ashamed at the same time*

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:40 am
by MonkeyM666
godzillasushi wrote:
The Todd wrote:The Todd might be the only one here who feels this way, but my vote would be for Atlantis: The Lost Empire and Treasure Planet as my favorite Disney animated movies.

MOUSE-FIVE!!!!!

EDIT - Well, those two or Shawshank Redemption..... :wink:


Treasure Planet wasn't so awfully bad. It had some great parts.



@Robo, Darkwing Duck was quite funny. Do you remember Mighty Ducks? That was alright.

Still, we all know nothing touches the big three. Duck Tales, Tale Spin, and Rescue Rangers.


Don't forget Marsupalami, or Aladdin the animated series (a personal favourite... Mechanicles was a great villain). And the Always forgotten, Gummie Bears one of the best Disney’s series to ever come out. yes that's right... THE BEST!


EDIT:
BuckyO'harre wrote:
godzillasus hi wrote:Darkwing Duck . Duck Tales, Tale Spin, and Rescue Rangers.



I can still sing the theme songs to all of those...


*feels somewhat proud and ashamed at the same time*


Same here... and I'm damn proud of it. :D

Just an addition. the newer Hercules series was quite good as well. I was in love with the mythology more then the stories though.

Re: Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2007 5:33 am
by bastard_robo
DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:
bastard_robo wrote:
Atlantis and Treasure Planet

These two were just fine animation filmmaking.. yet they both sunk at the Box Office.. and no one really gives them credit as good movies.. which they are..


Goddamn putz...


sorry Dino... Missed that one...

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 8:28 am
by DinoDeLaurentiis
Meh... it was a the honest mistake, eh? :wink:

Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 9:08 am
by bastard_robo
DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:Meh... it was a the honest mistake, eh? :wink:


You've taught me a life lesson this day dino.... Always read! at least throughly...

Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 3:32 am
by bastard_robo
Forgot one!


Emperors New Groove!

Instant Classic!

It dosnt follow any of the Disney traits and it had me rolling in parts!

Re: Atlantis: The Lost Empire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2014 12:51 pm
by TheButcher
DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:
Doc Holliday wrote:I keep forgetting all about Atlantis, without ever really having much of a sense of what direction they took it in. Gotta say Dino, from your summary I am pretty interested to catch this now - thanks! :D


She also has a some good character designs from a the Mike Mignola, eh?

io9:
Mike Mignola's Otherworldly Concept Art For Disney's Atlantis

Re: Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 5:11 am
by TheButcher
The Walt Disney Family Museum Presents Leading Ladies and Femmes Fatales: The Art of Marc Davis
Exhibition Celebrates Award-Winning Work by one of Walt's infamous Nine Old Men

Re: Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 5:22 am
by TheButcher
Bela Lugosi Meets a Hollywood Animator
Michael Mallory wrote:And this was not even Lugosi’s first brush with animation. Several years earlier he had been hired to mime the role of the Chernabog in Fantasia for animator Bill Tytla, but Tytla felt Lugosi’s performance was too blatant and rejected it.

Still, Chernabog’s evil smile suggests that a little bit of Bela Lugosi seeped through.

Re: Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:31 am
by TheButcher
Making his Marc: "Art of Marc Davis" exhibit to open at Walt Disney Family Museum next month, "Walt Disney's Renaissance Man" to be published this Fall
Today, March 30th, marks the 101st anniversary of Marc Davis' birth and, with two upcoming events, it looks like 2014 is going to be as remarkable as 1993. When Marc, at age 80, had a six-week exhibition of his very personal artwork at The Howard Lowery Gallery in Burbank, Calif.

Re: Best Disney Cartoon

PostPosted: Sun Oct 19, 2014 6:23 am
by TheButcher
Where Are the Disney Villains of Yesteryear?



12 Things to Know about SLEEPING BEAUTY and the Art of Disney Animation
hristina Radish wrote:Disney’s ultimate princess fairytale classic Sleeping Beauty is now available on Diamond Edition Blu-ray, DVD, Digital HD and Disney Movies Anywhere, with all-new special features. While at the home Walt Disney built on Woking Way in Los Feliz, Calif. in 1932, for an event celebrating Sleeping Beauty and Maleficent, we learned a lot about the development process and the evolution of the artwork, especially from chatting with Doug Engalla, a staff member at the Disney Animation Research Library since 1990.

During a presentation about the evolution of the 1959 animated favorite, which started down a path to development as far back as 1951 and continued right up until its release, Engalla talked about how the story changed, the evolution of the villain Maleficent, and the exacting nature of the artwork. Hit the jump to learn more about the film and the art of Disney animation.

Here are some of the highlights, along with photos of some of the art of Sleeping Beauty:
Peter Pan and Lady and the Tramp had mixed response, but the success of Cinderella made Walt Disney realize that they needed to tell a story like that again. So, they decided to tell the story of a strong female protagonist that people could cheer for, but he also wanted it to be a different movie, visually.

The original story of Sleeping Beauty didn’t have very much conflict going for it, as she slept for 100 years before she woke up. So, they went in and redid the whole thing to include a villain. They really built up Maleficent to gave the prince something to fight for.

Staff artist Eyvind Earle was painting backdrops, but had a very graphic, bold style, and that’s what Disney was looking for with Sleeping Beauty. His influences were gothic art, as well as medieval art and art of the Middle Ages. He created the look and style for the film, that was such a distinctive style that all of the artists in charge of painting backgrounds for the film had to learn how to paint like Eyvind Earle, who was very exacting.

Maleficent and her raven was inspired by medieval art. In a book of religious paintings, Mark Davis saw a character that had a design of fire as a pattern on the fabric of their clothing, so he started to employ that into her sleeves. The color in her robes went from red to purple, as the character evolved. He designed the headdress to give it that sense of evil because Maleficent was more complicated and an elegant force of evil.

They were always working on the story, so there were a few different versions of Maleficent was a fairy with antennae, and not the headdress. And she also had a falcon named Diablo as a co-hort. Although the raven was never officially named Diablo in the 1959 film, it has been verified by a lot of the animators that they referred to the raven as Diablo.

It was the first film to be produced in the super wide screen process of techno-rama. Sleeping Beauty was consciously designed for the wide screen, with huge plates of backgrounds and animation. One second’s worth of film is 24 frames, so 24 drawings are required. If you multiply that by a movie that’s nearly 90 minutes, that’s a lot of drawings, so nine years to make the film was about right. Now, the time to make an animated film, from beginning to end, is about three to four years.

The Disney Animation Research Library is a repository of Disney animation production art. The collection includes about 60 to 65 million pieces, and it encompasses the first 90 years of Walt Disney Animation Studios, starting with some of the earliest films, such as the Oswald shorts and even a piece from one of the Alice Comedies, through to the present day, including Big Hero 6.

It’s an in-house company with temperature controlled vaults that are humidity controlled. There are specialists in the museum field and the art history field, and they wear gloves when they work with the artwork. Their job is to preserve the entire collection, but make it as accessible as they can. They are working with a digital initiative to catalogue, rehouse and capture the images, so that they can be seen.

The rarest piece they have is the oldest piece, which is a drawing form one of the Alice Comedies that was recently found accidentally. They opened a package of animation drawings to rehouse them and put them in better condition. Some of the drawings were isolated by makeshift folders, and when they opened up one of the folders, they realized there was a drawing on it. After doing a little research, they realized that it was a character from one of the Alice Comedies, and it’s the only such drawing that they’ve found, so far.

They get new pieces a couple of different ways. They’ll get phone calls from people at the studio who find something, such as a promotional marionette from Pinocchio. Sometimes they even get stuff sent to them anonymously.

Sometimes, someone will have faked a piece of art, so they will check with the directors that are still around, in order to verify authenticity.

The collection includes a background painting of Mickey Mouse in an Army uniform, wearing the hat and saluting. It’s from a government film that the studio made, called “Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Firing Line,” that was supposed to be shown before the main feature to tell everyone in the audience to save their bacon grease to help make better bombs. It’s the only time you see Mickey Mouse in a military uniform, in any of the cartoons.



Animation Addicts Podcast #76: Sleeping Beauty – Make It Pink! Make It Blue!
It’s Chelsea’s birthday episode! The Rotoscopers finally review one of the Disney films that they’ve had on their bucket list since they started the show: Walt Disney’s Sleeping Beauty.