Official RATATOUILLE Review Thread - SPOILERS

Anime, cartoons and 3D. Animated shorts and features. And don't forget the animation genius in Bulgaria.

yadda...

10
14
47%
9
6
20%
8
4
13%
7
4
13%
6
0
No votes
5
0
No votes
4
0
No votes
3
0
No votes
2
1
3%
1
0
No votes
I'll wait for TV/DVD
1
3%
I wont be seeing this
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 30

Postby Zarles on Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:37 pm

The sequence with Remy and his brother outrunning the granny with the shotgun and gas mask reminded me a LOT of some old Tex Avery-style cartoons from when I was a kid.

Throw in a little Looney Tunes, some Sylvester and Tweety, and there you go. It's probably one of my favorite scenes of the whole thing. They could've done just that as a short and I would've been equally satisfied.

Also - could somebody please edit the title so that all these SPOILERS are mentioned? Now that it's out and all. Thanks. :)
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Nordling on Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:47 pm

I want Anton Ego's monologue about criticism put on a plaque. Brilliant stuff.
Image
User avatar
Nordling
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2092
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 8:39 am
Location: Missouri City, TX

Postby DinoDeLaurentiis on Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:53 pm

Nordling wrote:I want Anton Ego's monologue about criticism put on a plaque. Brilliant stuff.


Hehehe... yes, a little bit of a the mud inna the eyes of a the critics, no?
User avatar
DinoDeLaurentiis
SHE'S A THE SARAH SILVERMAN
 
Posts: 11284
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 12:15 pm
Location: Private Villa inna Santorini

Postby Zarles on Mon Jul 02, 2007 3:09 pm

Anton's bit at the end of it really shocked me. It was just so human and sensitive. I expected the usual 'Let's get rid of the bad guy!' sequence that is always present in animated movies, and instead, I got said bad guy coming to grips with himself and finally getting to remember what it is he really loves about food. It really caught me off guard, but thinking back, I can't even imagine any other way they could've successfully ended it.
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Cha-Ka Khan on Mon Jul 02, 2007 4:34 pm

Zarles wrote:Anton's bit at the end of it really shocked me. It was just so human and sensitive.


Good point. His "flashback" sequence was wonderful.

I also liked all of the little touches in the film, such as his "spit-take" where he almost spits out the wine, quickly looks at the label on the bottle, holds the wine back in and manages to swallow it down. :lol

Or the part where Linguini is describing to Colette about his "Little Chef" and he holds his thumb and forefinger an inch apart and stammers "I uh, umm, I uh, have a little..." and she cringes in horror. I literally LOL'd in the theater at the look on her face.
User avatar
Cha-Ka Khan
UNGRATEFUL BASTARD
 
Posts: 939
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2007 10:55 am

Postby Zarles on Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:18 pm

I'd forgotten about that! Great stuff. I also enjoyed when Collette pulls the pepper spray on him, and suddenly the scene turns into their first kiss. So very sweet and disturbing at the same time. :lol:
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Ribbons on Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:44 pm

Zarles wrote:The sequence with Remy and his brother outrunning the granny with the shotgun and gas mask reminded me a LOT of some old Tex Avery-style cartoons from when I was a kid.

Throw in a little Looney Tunes, some Sylvester and Tweety, and there you go. It's probably one of my favorite scenes of the whole thing. They could've done just that as a short and I would've been equally satisfied.


I can't wait for the spin-off, Granny with a Shotgun...
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby Zarles on Mon Jul 02, 2007 7:56 pm

It's already been penciled in for Grindhouse 2.
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby DinoDeLaurentiis on Tue Jul 03, 2007 2:32 pm

By the way, for alla you putzes who like a the "Lifted" short, eh? She's available onna the iTunes...
User avatar
DinoDeLaurentiis
SHE'S A THE SARAH SILVERMAN
 
Posts: 11284
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 12:15 pm
Location: Private Villa inna Santorini

Postby minstrel on Tue Jul 03, 2007 2:40 pm

DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:By the way, for alla you putzes who like a the "Lifted" short, eh? She's available onna the iTunes...


Is it? I just checked, and I can't find it.
"Everybody is equally shitty and wrong." - Ribbons
User avatar
minstrel
Leader of the Insquirrelgency
 
Posts: 12634
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: Area 52

Postby Zarles on Tue Jul 03, 2007 2:43 pm

Me either. Hitting the grappa already, Dino?
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Chairman Kaga on Tue Jul 03, 2007 2:49 pm

minstrel wrote:
DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:By the way, for alla you putzes who like a the "Lifted" short, eh? She's available onna the iTunes...


Is it? I just checked, and I can't find it.

It should be on the front page of the store. $1.99
Chairman Kaga
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 7660
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 9:49 am

Postby Zarles on Tue Jul 03, 2007 2:54 pm

Nevermind, there it is. I still think Dino's hitting the grappa, though.
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby DinoDeLaurentiis on Wed Jul 04, 2007 7:51 am

Alla you blind goddamn putzes...
User avatar
DinoDeLaurentiis
SHE'S A THE SARAH SILVERMAN
 
Posts: 11284
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 12:15 pm
Location: Private Villa inna Santorini

Postby Evil Hobbit on Wed Jul 04, 2007 6:36 pm

It's not coming out here till August 1st but I just listened the soundtrack and that is already one of the finest scores of the year. Michael Giacchino did it again, what a delightfull orchestrations and playfull instrumentations of highly complex cues and themes. Brilliant stuff. I wish all scores for animated films where this good.
User avatar
Evil Hobbit
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 1248
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2005 6:35 am
Location: the Netherlands

Postby Nordling on Thu Jul 05, 2007 5:58 pm

My favorite piece of dialogue this year.

Anton Ego, as voiced by Peter O'Toole wrote:In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgment. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face is that, in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. But there are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is in the discovery and defense of the new. Last night, I experienced something new, an extraordinary meal from a singularly unexpected source. To say that both the meal and its maker have challenged my preconceptions is a gross understatement. They have rocked me to my core. In the past, I have made no secret of my disdain for Chef Gusteau's famous motto: Anyone can cook. But I realize that only now do I truly understand what he meant. Not everyone can become a great artist, but a great artist can come from anywhere. It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than those of the genius now cooking at Gusteau's, who is, in this critic's opinion, nothing less than the finest chef in France. I will be returning to Gusteau's soon, hungry for more.
Image
User avatar
Nordling
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2092
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 8:39 am
Location: Missouri City, TX

Postby Maui on Thu Jul 05, 2007 6:30 pm

Nordling wrote:My favorite piece of dialogue this year.

Anton Ego, as voiced by Peter O'Toole wrote:In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgment. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face is that, in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. But there are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is in the discovery and defense of the new. Last night, I experienced something new, an extraordinary meal from a singularly unexpected source. To say that both the meal and its maker have challenged my preconceptions is a gross understatement. They have rocked me to my core. In the past, I have made no secret of my disdain for Chef Gusteau's famous motto: Anyone can cook. But I realize that only now do I truly understand what he meant. Not everyone can become a great artist, but a great artist can come from anywhere. It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than those of the genius now cooking at Gusteau's, who is, in this critic's opinion, nothing less than the finest chef in France. I will be returning to Gusteau's soon, hungry for more.


I went to see this just last night. Brilliant piece of animation. By far one of Pixar's greatest works. The above dialogue is stunning - the entire theatre went competely still as this was spoken by the food critic. I think out of all the movies Pixar has done, this one in particular was geared for an older audience, sure there is stuff for the kidlets, but definitely some words of wisdom for the adults. If nothing else, it still gives me hope for myself, in the kitchen. Anyone can cook, right? :D
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby burlivesleftnut on Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:23 pm

Not you.
Image
User avatar
burlivesleftnut
I <3 PACINA
 
Posts: 10626
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 10:28 am
Location: Port Angeles, WA

Postby Maui on Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:27 pm

burlivesleftnut wrote:Not you.


pfffffffttt.....

Sure I can, I just need a rat and a big chef hat.
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby Zarles on Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:31 pm

I mentioned this out on the TBs, but I also think that this was Pixar's first step towards a more mature, adult film. Taking into account that they're following it up with Wall-E and a movie about old people and all.

Hey, Maui's back! :)
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Ribbons on Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:03 am

I loved this movie, probably more than any I've seen all year (though I haven't seen many). It's by far the most consistently hilarious Pixar film to date, and the action scenes are elaborate and inventive in ways that wouldn't even be possible to realize in live action. I enjoyed the story as well; it was similar to Incredibles in the sense that it was about cherishing and cultivating special talents, but the execution worked better for me this time around, I guess.

Voice work was great. I'd read a couple of reviews saying that Patton Oswalt was miscast, but he seemed right at home as Remy, save for one scene in the rain where he gives his father a speech about forward progress that I thought could have used a little more punky power. Incidentally, I listened for John Ratzenberger's voice in the film, but I must have missed his cameo; IMDb has him down as someone named Mustafa, but I don't know who that is.

The story sags a bit near the end; a couple of beats transpire in order to threaten the success of Gusteau's and drive Remi and Linguini apart that feel a tad forced, although it pulls everything off fairly nicely by the end of the film. Speaking of running out of steam, uh... I guess that's all I have to say.

Oh! P.S.: WALL•E teaser in DLP = *drooool*
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby minstrel on Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:36 am

Ratzenberger was Mustafa, who was the head waiter. He put on a French accent, and somehow, now nobody can pick him out! But he had a bigger part than the Underminer, so watch (and listen!) closely.

:)
"Everybody is equally shitty and wrong." - Ribbons
User avatar
minstrel
Leader of the Insquirrelgency
 
Posts: 12634
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: Area 52

Postby Ribbons on Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:47 am

minstrel wrote:Ratzenberger was... the head waiter. He put on a French accent, and somehow, now nobody can pick him out! But he had a bigger part than the Underminer, so watch (and listen!) closely.


Ah, that was the dude who said he killed a man with his thumb, right?
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby Nordling on Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:55 am

No, that was Horst, as voiced by Will Arnett.
Image
User avatar
Nordling
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2092
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 8:39 am
Location: Missouri City, TX

Postby Maui on Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:06 pm

What's interesting is that French Chefs do take their ranking quite seriously. My Mom and I saw this flick the other night. We were talking about the movie this morning. In the movie Gusteau dies after he loses his 5 star ranking and moves to 3 stars. I believe they mention he dies suddenly of a heart attack. About 2 years ago, a famous french chef lost his 5 star ranking from a burning critique and commited suicide as a result. I wonder if Gusteau's story was inspired from this.

I just can't say enough good things about this movie. Just a stunning piece of work. I also thoroughly enjoyed the short, "Lifted". The alien nervously trying to maneouver the beam and the human. Funny stuff!
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby DinoDeLaurentiis on Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:50 pm

Maui wrote:About 2 years ago, a famous french chef lost his 5 star ranking from a burning critique and commited suicide as a result.


Bernard Loiseau, no? He was a the good friend of a the Dino, eh? I'm a never gonna to rest unna'til his a death, she is a the AVENGED!!!

Goddamn critics...
User avatar
DinoDeLaurentiis
SHE'S A THE SARAH SILVERMAN
 
Posts: 11284
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 12:15 pm
Location: Private Villa inna Santorini

Postby Maui on Fri Jul 06, 2007 5:45 pm

DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:Bernard Loiseau, no?
Goddamn critics...


Oui, Monsieur Loiseau :(
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby Ribbons on Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:13 pm

Maui wrote:
DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:Bernard Loiseau, no?

Oui, Monsieur Loiseau :(


Man, that's rough. Do restaurants really lose a star if their chef dies too?
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby minstrel on Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:14 pm

Ribbons wrote:
Maui wrote:
DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:Bernard Loiseau, no?

Oui, Monsieur Loiseau :(


Man, that's rough. Do restaurants really lose a star if their chef dies too?


Well, yeah, if he was their star chef.

:wink:
"Everybody is equally shitty and wrong." - Ribbons
User avatar
minstrel
Leader of the Insquirrelgency
 
Posts: 12634
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: Area 52

Postby Ribbons on Sat Jul 07, 2007 5:27 am

I was watching The Incredibles on DVD a couple weeks back and one of the extras mentioned something about "the universal man" -- basically most of the supporting and background characters from the movie were the same man, with a couple of features stretched out or exaggerated here and there, because they didn't have time to design every single one of them. The animators seemed to have a lot of anxiety on this particular point, but I hadn't noticed the recurring faces, really, until I heard them talking about it; I just chalked it up as the "aesthetic" of the film, I guess. But I kept thinking of that "universal man" template during Ratatouille, because I honestly think I saw the same woman about 10 times.
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby burlivesleftnut on Sat Jul 07, 2007 10:25 am

I seemed to see the same beady eyed gray rat alot. Maybe it's the same thing?
Image
User avatar
burlivesleftnut
I <3 PACINA
 
Posts: 10626
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 10:28 am
Location: Port Angeles, WA

Postby Ribbons on Sat Jul 07, 2007 12:42 pm

Sheeit, I think you're onto something there
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby Maui on Sat Jul 07, 2007 5:05 pm

Ribbons wrote:the action scenes are elaborate and inventive in ways that wouldn't even be possible to realize in live action.



The action scenes were incredible. The fixing soup scene was amazing but even before that when Remy plunges into the soapy water then runs through a kitchen full of fiery ovens. The panoramic views of Paris were stunning, they truly captured Paris at night. I especially liked when Remy would smell the food and wave his hand up to his nose to take in the aroma.

Image
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby Zarles on Sat Jul 07, 2007 5:11 pm

One of my favorites was when Remy got washed down the drain into the sewer. It just felt so REAL - like what it would actually feel like and look like for a rat in that situation. Usually when you see a small animal getting battered around in a stream or river or the like in an animated film, it's very sanitized and safe, but Pixar didn't take that route at all.
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Maui on Sat Jul 07, 2007 6:32 pm

Zarles wrote:One of my favorites was when Remy got washed down the drain into the sewer. It just felt so REAL - like what it would actually feel like and look like for a rat in that situation. Usually when you see a small animal getting battered around in a stream or river or the like in an animated film, it's very sanitized and safe, but Pixar didn't take that route at all.


Yeah, that was very clever. I think I held my breath through that entire scene. :shock:
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby Ribbons on Sat Jul 07, 2007 6:55 pm

I loved the whole scene where Remy's sneaking through the nooks and crannies of the apartment looking for something to eat -- especially the stereotypical French fight he witnesses where the guy dares his girlfriend his shoot him and then they start making out.
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby Zarles on Sat Jul 07, 2007 7:00 pm

Hehe. I liked all the token French movie scenes scattered throughout, as well. I swear that some of them were scenes from actual movies. The commentary on the DVD will be interesting to hear, if Brad can manage to NOT YELL AT US in it.
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Evil Hobbit on Sat Aug 04, 2007 6:25 pm

Finally saw it (released this week in the netherlands) and I am blown away! Easily the best film of the year so far. What a brilliant experience. Don't realy know what to say atm, film is still to fresh in my mind but I loved it sooooo much. It ranks high on that list with Pinocchio and the other classics. I rate it a solid 10 on first impression.
User avatar
Evil Hobbit
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 1248
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2005 6:35 am
Location: the Netherlands

Postby Maui on Sat Aug 04, 2007 8:24 pm

Evil Hobbit wrote:Finally saw it (released this week in the netherlands) and I am blown away! Easily the best film of the year so far. What a brilliant experience. Don't realy know what to say atm, film is still to fresh in my mind but I loved it sooooo much. It ranks high on that list with Pinocchio and the other classics. I rate it a solid 10 on first impression.


Glad you enjoyed Remy. I felt the same way about this movie. It was outstanding!!!
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby Zarles on Sat Aug 04, 2007 11:34 pm

I was considering the fact that there is a band in this movie composed entirely of rats. Not only that, but their musical instruments are things like pepper shakers and old silverware. What's cooler than that?
User avatar
Zarles
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 3773
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:52 am
Location: Bringing something to the table

Postby Pacino86845 on Fri Oct 05, 2007 4:40 am

I guess I'm in the same camp as Keepcool, burl, and Cha-Ka... a technically brilliant film with ingenious moments, if not a little *too* straightforward in the story.

Keepcoolbutcare wrote:Another technical marvel from Pixar, steeped with draw dropping, mouth watering set-pieces de resistance, if there’s any justice in the film world (and there isn’t) Brad Bird will receive a Best Director nomination for his dazzling camera etiquette (pay particular attention to angles and perspective), the sheer kinetic inventiveness of the multiple chase scenes, scrum-diddly-umptious chop suey editing choices (two brilliant scenes will stand out for years to come in editing classes), and remarkable ability to garnish this colorful ganache of cinema with images you won’t soon forget. Prettiest picture I’ve peeped all year, that’s for damn certain.


Seconded, thirded, etc. I love it when we feel the same about a film, makes writing about it so much easier for me (all I have to do is quote you, LOL. Nicely done.)

I’ve been reading some of the online comments about the inherent implausibility and ick factor involving a flick with a rat handling human food


Bah, if the rat washes its hands I'd eat the food it prepares. People are r-tards when it comes to germs.

a rat in the kitchen as savior rather than a pestilence, that makes the enterprise so amusing, no?


Amusing, bittersweet irony, don't judge a book by its cover, appearances can be deceiving, etc. Harkens back a little to Iron Giant in that regard.

My one gripe would be that the plotting never crystallized for me, simply too simplistic for my refined palate


I feel the same way about the story, but I don't penalize it so much 'cause of Bird's clear mastery in taking the time to build the story over the film's running length. As simple as it was, the story wasn't dull. I personally had trouble hooking on to Linguini, but despite this things always move along at a nice pace. Bird wrote a heck of a silent film here, with sparse dialogue, placing heavy emphasis on the visual storytelling.

The flow of the story is akin to enjoying a fine meal at a restaurant rather than the fastfood that's shoved down our throats of other animated features.

somewhat controversial worldview stated so succinctly by Dash in THE INCREDIBLES)


Refresh my memory? What are you referring to?

The Five-Star ending came close to making this a near classic, but my innate finicky-ness prevents me from giving it that delectable distinction.


Anton Ego was the runaway star of the film. I hadn't known it was O'Toole behind the "mask," I smiled when I saw his name in the credits.

Whether fleeing a surprisingly well armed French granny, rollickingly sloshing into the sewer system, avoiding all manner of man made obstacles, scurrying to and fro, the film is at its best when Bird just cuts loose, cramming a good 75+ years of perilous animated high jinks into eye-popping wonders of escaping entertainment.


You get five stars for that alone.

It's been a hell of a year in animation, Ratatouille being the third awesome animated film I've seen.

I rate the film 8/10 (very good-excellent)
User avatar
Pacino86845
EGYPTIAN LOVER
 
Posts: 14064
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 5:20 am

Postby Ribbons on Fri Oct 05, 2007 5:35 am

Pacino86845 wrote:Bah, if the rat washes its hands I'd eat the food it prepares. People are r-tards when it comes to germs.


I would probably eat the food it prepares even if it didn't. :shock:
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby Ribbons on Fri Oct 05, 2007 3:12 pm

Pacino86845 wrote:
...somewhat controversial worldview stated so succinctly by Dash in THE INCREDIBLES

Refresh my memory? What are you referring to?


I think Dash's philosophy was that everyone is not special as opposed to Chef Gusteau, whose famous book declared "Anyone Can Cook!"...

Helen Parr: Everyone is special, Dash.
Dash: Which is just another way of saying no one is.


...in fact, because of the world of The Incredibles being what it is, people are either born into auspice or they're not, which is almost the opposite of The Iron Giant, where a machine programmed to kill can become a selfless hero, and Ratatouille, where a rat can become the greatest chef in Paris, and the son of Gusteau can't even cook a Hot Pocket.
Last edited by Ribbons on Fri Oct 05, 2007 3:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby Pacino86845 on Fri Oct 05, 2007 3:21 pm

Ribbons wrote:
Pacino86845 wrote:Bah, if the rat washes its hands I'd eat the food it prepares. People are r-tards when it comes to germs.


I would probably eat the food it prepares even if it didn't. :shock:


Me too...

Ribbons wrote:
Pacino86845 wrote:
...somewhat controversial worldview stated so succinctly by Dash in THE INCREDIBLES

Refresh my memory? What are you referring to?


I think Dash's philosophy was that everyone is not special as opposed to Chef Gusteau, whose famous book declared "Anyone Can Cook!"...

Helen Parr: Everyone is special, Dash.
Dash: Which is just another way of saying no one is.


...in fact, because of the world of The Incredibles being what it is, people are either born special or they're not, which is almost the opposite of The Iron Giant and Ratatouille, where a rat can become the greatest chef in Paris, and the son of Gusteau can't even cook a Hot Pocket.


That's interesting, 'cause getting back to The Incredibles... you just reminded me of what Syndrome said about the supers... that he planned on making his inventions available to everyone, so everyone could be special, "and then no one would be." Wiping away a sniffle from his nose.
User avatar
Pacino86845
EGYPTIAN LOVER
 
Posts: 14064
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 5:20 am

Postby Ribbons on Fri Oct 05, 2007 3:28 pm

Yeah, definitely an echo of what Dash says early on in the movie there
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13794
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Postby Maui on Fri Oct 05, 2007 6:56 pm

Ah....VOTE FOR KCBC - Ratatouille Review!!!!
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby TonyWilson on Thu Oct 18, 2007 2:45 pm

What an utterly enchanting movie. Beautiful in the way it looks, Paris is all subtle hues and european animation, the Kitchen was so real, at times I could have sworn they filmed real interiors and added the characters in afterwards.
Interestingly enough I saw this last night after rewatching Perfume: Story Of A Murderer at a mate's, they make a wonderfully complimentary two course film feast. Both are about beings with an extraordinary sense that makes them outsiders to everyone yet it gives them a gift that can change people's hearts.
I prefer Ratatouille though, the sheer kineticism of the film pulls you along with nary stumble.
Ego's speech is a truly great speech but it pulled me out of the movie - a little too knowing in my opinion (what can you expect from a Simpsons alumni though?)
Elitism is positing that your taste is equivalent to quality, you hate "Hamlet" does it make it "bad"? If you think so, you're one elite motherfucker.
User avatar
TonyWilson
No Less Liquid Than His Shadow
 
Posts: 9155
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 3:45 am
Location: A Drained Swimming Pool

Postby Maui on Thu Oct 18, 2007 2:56 pm

TonyWilson wrote:Ego's speech is a truly great speech but it pulled me out of the movie - a little too knowing in my opinion (what can you expect from a Simpsons alumni though?)


Well, all the little kidlets in the theatre starting to fidget during this speech.

I enjoyed it though, the big kid that I am. ;)

Wow, Grenouille to Remy in one night!! That must have heightened your senses!
User avatar
Maui
WoWie
 
Posts: 7601
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 10:19 pm

Postby tapehead on Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:44 am

An attitude of benevolence and care pervades the entire film
- it's the most sophisticated story, and possibly the most beautiful yet of
all the Pixar movies but definitely by far the most kinetic and
dynamic in terms of moving p.o.v shots utilised, movements of
characters through different environments, backgrounds and
atmospheres in the same sequence (the only previous works that come
close are 'The Incredibles' and 'Finding Nemo').

It would be impossible to name check or catalogue the way in which
this movie seems to be the distillation of the fluid motion, inventiveness,
goofyness, playful joy and wonderment of all the 'toons I've watched since
I can remember - but most especially the best of Loony Toons and Disney.

'Sophisticated' for such a large scale and admittedly commercial
piece, it's a film that manages to value acquiring good taste and
having a 'palate' as much as it does the Disney staples of family
and wholesomeness.

Apart from Garafolo's dodgy French accent, all the voice characters
are superb, but especially Peter O'Toole. However it happens to be
that his voice meshes so perfectly with the image of Ego on-screen,
from his voice over as Ego clatters away at his typewriter, to his
Proustian reminiscence (at the taste of Remy's where he is
transported back to a moment in childhood with his mother) and
change of heart after Ego tastes Ratatouille, Ego has become one of
my favourite of Pixar's / Brad Bird's creations.
User avatar
tapehead
BALLS!!!
 
Posts: 9427
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 2:13 pm
Location: OZ

Postby MonkeyM666 on Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:49 am

tapehead wrote:An attitude of benevolence and care pervades the entire film
- it's the most sophisticated story, and possibly the most beautiful yet of
all the Pixar movies but definitely by far the most kinetic and
dynamic in terms of moving p.o.v shots utilised, movements of
characters through different environments, backgrounds and
atmospheres in the same sequence (the only previous works that come
close are 'The Incredibles' and 'Finding Nemo').

It would be impossible to name check or catalogue the way in which
this movie seems to be the distillation of the fluid motion, inventiveness,
goofyness, playful joy and wonderment of all the 'toons I've watched since
I can remember - but most especially the best of Loony Toons and Disney.

'Sophisticated' for such a large scale and admittedly commercial
piece, it's a film that manages to value acquiring good taste and
having a 'palate' as much as it does the Disney staples of family
and wholesomeness.

Apart from Garafolo's dodgy French accent, all the voice characters
are superb, but especially Peter O'Toole. However it happens to be
that his voice meshes so perfectly with the image of Ego on-screen,
from his voice over as Ego clatters away at his typewriter, to his
Proustian reminiscence (at the taste of Remy's where he is
transported back to a moment in childhood with his mother) and
change of heart after Ego tastes Ratatouille, Ego has become one of
my favourite of Pixar's / Brad Bird's creations.


Very nicely said Tape...

I look forward to seeing it soon. I'm glad that it is worth the time, as Cars was a fierce disappointment for me.
Image
User avatar
MonkeyM666
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 5403
Joined: Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:00 am
Location: Australia

PreviousNext

Return to Animation

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests