The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Anime, cartoons and 3D. Animated shorts and features. And don't forget the animation genius in Bulgaria.

Whose side are you on?

The Anti-Pixar League
13
25%
The Anti-Anti-Pixar League
33
63%
(in a whiny, girly voice) I like Dreamworks!
0
No votes
Why isn't [fill in the blank] on the poll?
6
12%
 
Total votes : 52

Postby Chairman Kaga on Wed Jul 04, 2007 2:19 pm

minstrel wrote:
Theta wrote:You left off some of my post, though. I said "it's easier to lose the story" in an animated film, which it is. Total control means that it's entirely up to the animators what the characters do and when they do it. So the difficulty isn't in moving the camera around; it's in having enough going on in the frame and in the story to justify moving the camera around in the first place.


I'd like to point out something else regarding the difference between animation and live action. In live action, actors can improvise. And there is always the chance of a "happy accident", in which someone might trip, or turn their head in reaction to some unplanned sound off screen, or something of the kind, and it makes the take better. Directors who shoot many takes, like Coppola and Kubrick, would then have the opportunity to use more-or-less unplanned material in the film that might have been better than what was originally planned for the shot. Directors who rely on improvisation, like Christopher Guest, build whole movies this way.

But in animation, there are NO "happy accidents". There is no unplanned material. The absolute control an animation director has means that he has to plan every last pixel in every last frame, and therefore there is no possibility that he might get "lucky" with a take.

In my view, this makes directing animation more difficult. While directing live action can be frustrating (when the weather doesn't cooperate, when extras blow the take, etc.), at times it can be rather easy: if you need ten seconds of an actor walking down a street, you set up your camera, call "Action", and you have your shot in ten seconds. Shoot, print, inna da can, old school, baby. An animation director, on the other hand, has to work as hard on that ten seconds as he does on ten seconds of his most spectacular action sequence.

That isn't entirely true because the animators individually create performances and though they are lead by the leads and director sometimes they create things that the director did not think of originally or that the director thinks is an improvement. That isn't always the case and though it's not the same as a happy accident simply filtering ideas through many people results in a similar opportunity to get different versions of a shot than were storyboarded out.
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Postby minstrel on Wed Jul 04, 2007 2:20 pm

DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:This a reminds a the Dino, did any of a you putzes stick around for a the ending credits inna the rat movie, eh? Towards a the end you gotta the Pixar Guarantee:

Pixar wrote:Our Quality Assurance Guarantee:
100% Genuine Animation!
No motion capture or any other
performance shortcuts were used in
the production of this film.


I stuck around and saw that. Gave me a grin!
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Postby MonkeyM666 on Thu Jul 05, 2007 5:04 am

minstrel wrote:
DinoDeLaurentiis wrote:Th is a reminds a the Dino, did any of a you putzes stick around for a the ending credits inna the rat movie, eh? Towards a the end you gotta the Pixar Guarantee:

Pixar wrote:Our Quality Assurance Guarantee:
100% Genuine Animation!
No motion capture or any other
performance shortcuts were used in
the production of this film.


I stuck around and saw that. Gave me a grin!


What a nice touch :)... it's true, motion capture is a bit of a short cut.
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Postby sephirenn on Thu Sep 27, 2007 3:57 pm

If we are speaking about standing the test of time, I think there are a few factors for films as it directly relates to Disney and animated features.

1) Obviously, the movie itself. Both the quality, and the popularity of it.

2) Kid's interest when it first comes out. As these movies will grow with these generations of kids, and they will herald them as the best family movies of all time when they grow old.

3) Marketing. This ends with most movies from Dreamworks etc. after the movie is released, but with Disney, certain films are carried on though dvd re-release, and more importantly, attractions at their theme parks.

As such, I think that so far, two of Pixar's movies/franchises have a serious chance of joining the leagues of Snow White etc.

1) Finding Nemo

Though it seems that most of you guys arn't big fans, it was huge when it released, and it was crazy popular with the kids. Between this, and the integration at Disney World, it has serious potential.

2) Toy Story

The main thing going for this movie, is that it was most people's first CGI movie, and it had that great Disney feel. Between the sequel, and now the trilogy, it might hold up.

As an aside, I think that the generation of kids the movies are released to is the most important point. Using solely my own experience, I hold Alladin, Lion King, and Little Mermaid in such a great light, because they were such amazing films to me when they were first released. I think Lion King holds up the best to me now, but I consider those among the best Disney movies, and its because I was a kid when they came out. This obviously gives me bias, but the kids now are going to have that same bias when seeing these things.

And I'm done ranting.
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Postby Fawst on Thu Sep 27, 2007 4:39 pm

Lion King is my favorite Disney movie, hands down, evar, all time.

But the best "Disney" movie, that's tough. Beauty and the Beast and Alladin are damn near tied for best new-school "classic" Disney. I think Alladin has the edge, because it's the more enjoyable film.

I don't know why I'm even typing this.
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Postby Fievel on Thu Sep 27, 2007 4:49 pm

sephirenn wrote:As such, I think that so far, two of Pixar's movies/franchises have a serious chance of joining the leagues of Snow White etc.

1) Finding Nemo

Though it seems that most of you guys arn't big fans, it was huge when it released, and it was crazy popular with the kids. Between this, and the integration at Disney World, it has serious potential.

2) Toy Story

The main thing going for this movie, is that it was most people's first CGI movie, and it had that great Disney feel. Between the sequel, and now the trilogy, it might hold up.


I think Toy Story will have more longevity than Finding The Disney Formula... oops, I mean Finding Nemo, will. If they were to find a smart way to continue the Monsters Inc story, I think that could be a long-lasting franchise as well. Heck, even The Incredibles. I don't know why I'm typing this either.
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Postby Ribbons on Thu Sep 27, 2007 4:53 pm

sephirenn wrote:3) Marketing. This ends with most movies from Dreamworks etc. after the movie is released, but with Disney, certain films are carried on though dvd re-release, and more importantly, attractions at their theme parks.

As such, I think that so far, two of Pixar's movies/franchises have a serious chance of joining the leagues of Snow White etc.

1) Finding Nemo

Though it seems that most of you guys arn't big fans, it was huge when it released, and it was crazy popular with the kids. Between this, and the integration at Disney World, it has serious potential.


I went to the Baltimore Aquarium about... two years ago, and there was this huge cluster of young children standing in front of one of the tanks. When I went over to see what was going on, it turned out that they were all looking at the clownfish, going "Nemo!" The quality of Disney films may waver over periods of time, but one thing has remained constant, at least since 1989: they've got kids in a vise.
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Postby Fawst on Thu Sep 27, 2007 4:55 pm

And they make kids want pets they probably shouldn't have. I mean, I begged and pleaded for my very own Genie for MONTHS after Alladin came out.

Not really... I was in High School. I begged and pleaded for my own Arabian Princess.
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Postby Lord Voldemoo on Thu Sep 27, 2007 5:08 pm

Fawst wrote:And they make kids want pets they probably shouldn't have. I mean, I begged and pleaded for my very own Genie for MONTHS after Alladin came out.

Not really... I was in High School. I begged and pleaded for my own Arabian Princess.


oh man, you scared me for a second there.

I was feeling really old.
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Postby Maui on Thu Sep 27, 2007 5:46 pm

Ratatouille is the one to beat now kids! Seriously, it's their finest hour!
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Postby Chairman Kaga on Thu Sep 27, 2007 5:48 pm

I disagree. I think Ratatouille was great but I think the massive changes made during production show on screen.
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Postby Maui on Thu Sep 27, 2007 5:50 pm

Chairman Kaga wrote:I disagree. I think Ratatouille was great but I think the massive changes made during production show on screen.


You are entitled to your opinion, even if it is wrong. 8)
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Postby Zarles on Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:10 pm

Chairman Kaga wrote:I disagree. I think Ratatouille was great but I think the massive changes made during production show on screen.


You mean the massive changes made towards total and utter greatness? You may have something there.
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Postby Peven on Tue Oct 09, 2007 9:53 pm

i guess this is the best place to post this, which i thought was an interesting little article....





By Kirk Honeycutt 2 hours, 49 minutes ago

SAN RAFAEL, California (Hollywood Reporter) - The "overnight" success of Pixar Animation Studios seemed like a smooth rocket ride, but Leslie Iwerks' documentary about the cartoon behemoth is a jolting reminder that it was a risky business venture.


An unstable combination of sheer determination, unending struggle, initial failures and gut instinct, it took an almost karmic combination of talent and fortuitous events to get that baby off the ground. Many people participated, but "The Pixar Story" rightly zeroes in on John Lasseter, Ed Catmull and their entrepreneurial godfather and backer, Steve Jobs, who all but willed the Pixar success into reality.

Having the run of the studios' archival footage, going back to before Pixar existed, and unparalleled access to just about everybody she needed to interview, Iwerks -- who previously made "The Hand Behind the Mouse," a documentary about her famous animator grandfather, Ub Iwerks -- delivers an incisive and often inspiring story of a group of super talents for whom failure was not an option.

After its world premiere at the Mill Valley Film Festival, Iwerks says she means to qualify the film for Oscar consideration. She then hopes to secure a theatrical release. But its real value will undoubtedly be as a DVD with expanded footage of the interviews and behind-the-scenes peeks that didn't make it into the 86-minute feature. This film will be an invaluable resource for film and animation historians, as well as multitudes of Pixar fans, from here to infinity and beyond.

Iwerks counts herself among those fans. So her portrait, narrated by Stacy Keach, is admiring, not journalistic. Even so, the most hard-bitten investigator would be hard-pressed not experience wonder at such a rousing story.

Computer animation was around long before Pixar. Animators in Europe and North America were experimenting with this combination of art and science in shorts dating back to the '70s. Yet there was often a lack of warmth in the designs, and representing humans, even cartoony ones, was a challenge. Features were out of the question.

Lasseter and Catmull were among the first to see the future so clearly. Lasseter came out of Cal Arts with training in Disney animation. He worked at Disneyland in Anaheim and eventually landed a job in Disney's Burbank studios. When "Tron," one of the first features to mix computer-generated action with live-action, came out of Walt Disney Pictures in 1982, Lasseter pushed for and got a unit that experimented with 3-D animation.

But such was the fear of the computer -- that somehow the computer would replace humans rather than becoming a new tool for animators -- that Lasseter was actually fired by Disney when he completed his project.

He joined the computer division of Lucasfilm, where he met Catmull, a computer scientist trained at the University of Utah, who helped develop digital image compositing technology.

In 1986, Jobs bought Lucasfilms' digital division and founded Pixar with Lasseter and Catmull as his key men.

After losing $1 million a year for five years, Jobs needed to see a return on his investment. So Pixar put "Toy Story," the first feature-length computer-animated film ever, into production.

"Some of us had never even worked on a movie," Lasseter notes.

Initially, Disney, which was to release "Toy Story," imposed its ideas on the production, to disastrous results. The first trial reel was awful, former vice chairman Roy Disney recalls.

Only when Pixar animators tore up those notes and went with gut instincts did the production take off. The worldwide gross of $350 million by "Toy Story" (1995) led Jobs to Wall Street, where he raised $132 million through an IPO. That put Pixar on a firm footing and led to a string of hits.

The company has never experienced either a critical or box office failure, though the film makes clear that "Toy Story 2," which had to start all over with nine months to go, was a close call.

What has made each film successful, Lasseter insists, is "not the idea but the people." The Pixar staff, working with new directors hired either from within the company -- such as Andrew Stanton and Pete Docter -- or, in the case of Brad Bird, from outside, has been up to the challenge to stretch the digital envelope as each new story drives the need for innovation.

After Disney, under CEO Bob Iger, acquired Pixar in January 2006, Lasseter and Catmull were put in charge of reinvigorating the Burbank studio. They have given directors more creative control of their projects and will return to traditional animation techniques instead of relying solely on computer animation, a reversal of a decision made by former chairman and CEO Michael Eisner.

The film, with its talking-heads interviews, does pile on the tech talk pretty heavily at times. But Iwerks more than makes up for this with home movies by the various Pixar pixies at work and play -- it's often hard to tell the difference -- and even Lasseter's own Student Academy Award-winning shorts. And the many interviewees -- from Tom Hanks, Tim Allen and Billy Crystal to George Lucas and Pixar animators -- do extremely lucid jobs of explaining that technology in terms of the artistic impact on each film.

It took Iwerks six years to make this film because the Pixar story kept evolving even as she worked. One suspects a sequel, were she so inclined, might be even more fascinating.

Writer-director-producer: Leslie Iwerks; Director of photography: Suki Medencevic; Music: Jeff Beal; Editors: Leslie Iwerks, Stephen Myers. Narrator: Stacy Keach.

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter
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Postby Maui on Tue Oct 09, 2007 10:26 pm

Peven wrote:
Computer animation was around long before Pixar. Animators in Europe and North America were experimenting with this combination of art and science in shorts dating back to the '70s. Yet there was often a lack of warmth in the designs, and representing humans, even cartoony ones, was a challenge. Features were out of the question.


One that comes to mind is the animation house, Mainframe. No matter what you thought of the series, Reboot (I personally liked it) - they were doing some groundbreaking stuff with animation, way before Pixar. They didn't have to worry about humanizing the characters as they were all robotic.
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Postby Chairman Kaga on Wed Oct 10, 2007 1:59 am

Maui wrote:
Peven wrote:
Computer animation was around long before Pixar. Animators in Europe and North America were experimenting with this combination of art and science in shorts dating back to the '70s. Yet there was often a lack of warmth in the designs, and representing humans, even cartoony ones, was a challenge. Features were out of the question.


One that comes to mind is the animation house, Mainframe. No matter what you thought of the series, Reboot (I personally liked it) - they were doing some groundbreaking stuff with animation, way before Pixar. They didn't have to worry about humanizing the characters as they were all robotic.

Huh?Eh never mind just noticed the above article mentions all that.
I look forward to this Iwerks film.
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Postby Crimson King on Mon Dec 17, 2007 5:50 pm

I just gotta say I'm in the Pixar-loving camp. My favorite so far is The Incredibles. The movie is just so damned good. Everything about it. I NEED a sequel to that movie. Like, NOW.

Cars is probably my least favorite of the Pixar movies, but I still thnk it's really good and enjoyable.

What I love about Pixar is that not only do they employ cutting edge technology, they do it in order to serve the story they're telling. Sure, Pixar has achieved a mass appeal, but I think they've done so in a way that isn't cheap or selling out. They tell good stories using incredible animation.

I remember I went to a midnight showing of Finding Nemo, you know, the Thursday before release. There were no kids in line. Everyone going to see this movie was an adult, or at least a teenager. And it was a long line, too. And during the movie everyone was laughing and having a good time. And that's what I've come to expect from Pixar: quality animation, quality story-telling and a good time at the theater. Ratatouille had that moment near the end that simultaneously cracked me up and almost made me cry (then again, maybe it almost made me cry from laughing so much....either way, that's something).
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Postby Seppuku on Mon Dec 17, 2007 5:53 pm

Can I just point out here and now, I didn't ask to be quoted at the beginning of this thread...

:roll:
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Postby Nordling on Mon Dec 17, 2007 5:54 pm

Once WALL-E comes out, the Anti-Pixar League will be swallowing the load. Better get those throat muscles working now.
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Postby Seppuku on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:05 pm

seppukudkurosawa wrote:Can I just point out here and now, I didn't ask to be quoted at the beginning of this thread...

:roll:


Also, Shane made this part up entirely:

seppukudkurosawa wrote:The Incredibles was OK, but I don't see why it brought so many AICNers to geekgasm. Maybe they wanted to see a Watchmen movie so badly that they made themselves love this, seeing as how it's the closest they'll ever get to seeing one..


:oops:
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Postby Chilli on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:08 pm

I had a cathartic moment of pure bliss while watching Cars, where everything in the world made sense. So for that reason, I am anti-anti Pixar.
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Postby godzillasushi on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:09 pm

Chilli wrote:I had a cathartic moment of pure bliss while watching Cars, where everything in the world made sense. So for that reason, I am anti-anti Pixar.


Explain this please. I am dying to know what you're talking about...
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Postby Chilli on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:17 pm

I avoided Cars for the longest period of time, because the reviews are pretty mediocre. Then I put it on, and while it started slow it just steadily built to this peak that had me captivated, smiling a goofy smile and just enjoying a film beyond a critical analysis, and in that style that a kid would enjoy a film where you fall so deeply into it that you can't pull yourself away no matter what, and wouldn't want to even if you could.

It was a beautiful, beautiful film.

I don't have many moments where things make complete sense, but when I was watching it I felt inspired by the films intent, by its innocence, by its themes and by its gentle nature. It gave me a renewed push to go ahead with my writing, to keep plugging away and refuse to let a crappy period in my life (2005 - 2007) get me down. The feeling may not have lasted for too long, but it made me feel truly happy without a thought of what came before or what would come afterwards.

Instead of wishing for something to appear on screen, I was savouring what was there. It just felt, to look at and feel, like the world should be instead of like it is.

On that day, watching that film, I felt completely at peace with everything. Especially as I watched it with my Dad. The two of us have vaguely similar tastes, but its very rare for us to be on the same page while watching something, and I like to think we shared something. It felt like a shared secret, something we didn't communicate in words or mannerisms, or confided in each other, but that we both saw on a level that we didn't need to explain.

If that sounds ridiculous, I apologise.

That's why I love Pixar, because they take me away and plonk me in a place where escapism is valued and welcomed. Its not like life gets so bad that it has to be done, but sometimes a zone out from the grudging gears of work and life and relationships is something I welcome.
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Postby Chairman Kaga on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:23 pm

Zarles wrote:
Chairman Kaga wrote:I disagree. I think Ratatouille was great but I think the massive changes made during production show on screen.


You mean the massive changes made towards total and utter greatness? You may have something there.

Hardly. It had one of the worst film cliches in the "forced kiss where the woman at first struggles and then accepts it" I've ever seen in a PIXAR flick. That instantly knocks it down the list.
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Postby Nordling on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:25 pm

When they showed the clips of WALL-E at BNAT, I was in rapture. For one thing, they brought the awe of space back. Remember that opening shot of STAR WARS? Well, when Wall-E first goes into space... it's just as iconic.
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Postby DaleTremont on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:26 pm

Nordling wrote:Once WALL-E comes out, the Anti-Pixar League will be swallowing the load. Better get those throat muscles working now.


Once Wall-E comes out, the Anti-Pixar league will spontaneously combust.
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Postby Chairman Kaga on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:27 pm

DaleTremont wrote:
Nordling wrote:Once WALL-E comes out, the Anti-Pixar League will be swallowing the load. Better get those throat muscles working now.


Once Wall-E comes out, the Anti-Pixar league will spontaneously combust.

We can only hope.
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Postby CeeBeeUK on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:28 pm

DaleTremont wrote:
Nordling wrote:Once WALL-E comes out, the Anti-Pixar League will be swallowing the load. Better get those throat muscles working now.


Once Wall-E comes out, the Anti-Pixar league will spontaneously combust.



Why are you all obsessed with this poor robots sexuality, it's the 21st Century people!

Let him find his robosexuality at his own pace ;)
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Postby Seppuku on Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:30 pm

When Philippa Boyens sees Wall-E, she's going to fucking give up!
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Postby Maui on Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:02 pm

Chilli wrote:I avoided Cars for the longest period of time, because the reviews are pretty mediocre. Then I put it on, and while it started slow it just steadily built to this peak that had me captivated, smiling a goofy smile and just enjoying a film beyond a critical analysis, and in that style that a kid would enjoy a film where you fall so deeply into it that you can't pull yourself away no matter what, and wouldn't want to even if you could.

It was a beautiful, beautiful film.


If you really liked Cars you will no doubt worship Ratatouille. I wasn't very fond of Cars - it just seemed like 1 big Tonka advertisement with a silly take on your typical US podunk.
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Postby Chilli on Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:03 pm

Missed that one at the cinema, but its on my DVD purchase list.
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Postby Maui on Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:04 pm

Chilli wrote:Missed that one at the cinema, but its on my DVD purchase list.


Good news! Let me know what you think once you've seen it. I have all the Pixar films and shorts - adore their work. Ratatouille's my fav!
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Postby Chilli on Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:06 pm

Awesome.

Save for that Boundin' short, they have a perfect track record with me.
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Postby Maui on Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:15 pm

Chilli wrote:Awesome.

Save for that Boundin' short, they have a perfect track record with me.


Nah, Boundin' was cute especially when that little sheep started to tap dance.
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Postby minstrel on Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:19 pm

Yeah, I'm not into Boundin', but Lifted is great!
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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby TheButcher on Tue Nov 23, 2010 8:54 pm

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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby RogueScribner on Wed Nov 24, 2010 12:11 am

Maybe I'm getting soft in my old age, but I think Toy Story 3 is the first Pixar movie aside from Wall-E that I really liked.
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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby Peven on Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:29 am

or maybe you are starting to develop some taste in movies, be optimistic
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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby RogueScribner on Wed Nov 24, 2010 2:06 am

Aside from the opening, Up was pretty lackluster. In fact, the movie got worse as it went on. bleh
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Re: Circle Seven vs. Pixar

Postby TheButcher on Wed Nov 24, 2010 7:22 am

From Jim Hill: The "Toy Story 3" that you didn't get to see
Looking for something fun to do with the family after you finish Thanksgiving dinner? Well, why not toss a copy of " Toy Story 3 " into the Blu-ray player. Where you can then learn about what happens to poor Buzz Lightyear once he started malfunctioning and then got sent back to Taiwan as part of this massive recall. Copyright Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved Oops. My mistake. That's not the version of this " Toy Story " sequel that Pixar spent 5 years perfecting. But - rather - the film that Disney Circle 7 Animation had in development. Copyright Disney Enterprises, inc. All rights reserved Circle 7 (as you'll recall) was the animation studio that Mouse House management set up back in 2005 when it looked like Disney & Pixar would definitely be parting ways. With the idea that this Glendale-based operation would then produce sequels to " A Bug's Life ," " Monsters, Inc. ," " The Incredibles ," " Finding Nemo...



From Jim Hill 7 Aug 2005:
When it comes to Pixar, the Mouse is sending very mixed messages

From Jim Hill 2 Aug 2005:
The Skinny on Circle Seven
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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby TheButcher on Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:27 am

From Blue Sky Disney:
The Real Reason "Newt" Got Canned
Honor Hunter wrote:A lot of people have bemoaned the loss of Pixar's "Newt" film when it was canceled last year...

Many Pixar fans were wondering why they would do something like this. The rants against sequels came up and several people wished that the film would be restarted. What most didn't pay attention to was the fact that Lasseter and crew took Gary Rydstrom's film debut and canceled it were the many similarities it had with a competing project: Rio.

The project from Blue Sky Studios(makers of "Ice Age") was about the last male of a species of bird that has to mate with the remaining female of the species. This along with the part of the story where they break free and go on a journey was considered too close to their own story. So much so that there was no way to retool the story unless it were to become something completely different than what they put into production.

Lasseter and Ed Catmull did not want another situation like what happened with "A Bug's Life" and "Antz" back when the Lamp was still new to the biz, having made only one film yet. And this time, they'd be coming after that film. This would look like they were deliberately copying Blue Sky, which Pixar had never ever planned or even wanted to do. They take pride in making films that have a particular stamp of individual creativity and the last thing John wants to be known for is ripping off someone else.

Well, a couple days ago, the second trailer for "Rio" came out and if you watch it you can clearly see the similarities that would have been compared to Pixar's own film. It shows how uncomfortable it would have been for the company to proceed forward with this project; investing tens of millions of dollars on something that the public could turn its back on since it had saw the film already. Rio, on the other hand, moved forward and will be released in April of next year. And Blue Sky's project looks to be a well crafted, fun story. The film looks breathtakingly beautiful and very entertaining. As for Disney North; there are plenty of projects in the pipeline in the coming years to enjoy.

Just none about the last male newt that existed...
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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby TheButcher on Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:18 pm

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Re: Circle 7 vs. Pixar

Postby TheButcher on Wed Mar 09, 2011 12:58 am

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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby Seppuku on Wed Mar 09, 2011 3:23 am

RogueScribner wrote:Aside from the opening, Up was pretty lackluster. In fact, the movie got worse as it went on. bleh


It's still a bit irritating that I was quoted in the original post. I even cried at Wall-E and Toy Story 3! Can't say I'm in love with any of their other pictures, and I totally agree with you about Up... Grumpy old man=built-in story arc=pathos=immediate kudos!!! Not much about that movie worked for me. Don't tell the new big boss man Nordling, though! I remember all the AICN reviews where they expected "squirrel!" to become a huge pop culture thing. Heh.



Anyway, they cool. Got no beef with them. I pretty much dig most animations I watch these days.
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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby Fievel on Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:29 pm

Seppuku wrote:I remember all the AICN reviews where they expected "squirrel!" to become a huge pop culture thing.


I got my "SQUIRREL!" yelling done after National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation came out (quoting Clark's Uncle Lewis)
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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby TheButcher on Tue Mar 22, 2011 5:54 am

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Re: Circle Seven vs. Pixar

Postby TheButcher on Wed Mar 07, 2012 4:22 am

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Re: CinemaCon 2014:Inside Out

Postby TheButcher on Sat Mar 29, 2014 1:29 am

‘Inside Out': Pixar's Brainy Family Flick Dazzles at CinemaCon
CinemaCon 2014: The bad news? Theater owners have to wait more than a year
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Inside Out

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 20, 2014 9:24 am

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Re: The Anti-Pixar League vs. The Anti-Anti-Pixar League

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 20, 2014 5:24 pm

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