New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

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New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby havocSchultz on Tue Jun 19, 2007 10:30 am

Main Page has the story here...



Harry wrote:Hey folks, Harry here... Well - so begins the next chapter in the magical stop-motion world of Aardman. After the Wererabbit and Flushed Away failed to excite US audiences at the box office, I found Dreamworks' lack of faith... disturbing.

Aardman is a magical company that has continually delivered brilliant animated work. Heck - even the unfortunately named FLUSHED AWAY - they made pixels charming and funny and timeless.

Well Sony snatched Aardman up wisely - and now they've announced their first film they're developing - and they're calling it a "family-friendly Tarantino" - here's what Variety has to say about it:


Variety wrote:...has signed writers Matthew Graham and Ashley Pharoah ("Life on Mars") to work with director Steve Box on comedy heist "The Cat Burglars." The film about milk-thieving stray cats will be in Aardman's trademark stop-frame claymation and combine the comedy action of Nick Park and Box's "Wallace & Gromit" feature with the cool styling of "Ocean's Eleven," Aardman says. Box promises auds something altogether new -- "family-friendly Tarantino."


Harry wrote:After that - Peter Lord is doing an adaptation of Gideon DeFoe's THE PIRATES! books like this one:

Image

There's all sorts of these books - the PIRATES don't just have adventures with Communists - they also adventure with Scientists, Ahab and Whaling, All I know is it sounds like the sort of books you should pick up for your kids. They need to have adventures with pirates, communists, a guy named Ahab and well... every kid should want to hunt whales... right? Heh.

Then there's OPERATION RUDOLPH, which is being written by one of those Academy Award nominated writers of BORAT (Peter Baynham) - who is writing an action Christmas night film about the militaristic operations by Santa Claus and his army of combat elves to deliver presents around the world in a single night.

Lastly... and most excitedly - Super Genius... Nick Park is developing another piece of brain-nip for us animation junkies. Nothing is known about this film... but it could be called "..." by Nick Park and I'd be trembling and screaming... "PERIOD PERIOD PERIOD!!!! FUCKING A! MAN!"

Exciting times - more Aardman for those of us that love em!
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Postby TheButcher on Wed Nov 28, 2007 9:06 pm

Wallace and Gromit return with a new short film Trouble At’ Mill.

source: WallaceandGromit.com and animated news
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Postby Cpt Kirks 2pay on Wed Nov 28, 2007 9:17 pm

This thread has gotta be a record. Before my posting here, it had 133 views and only 1 post.

Just saying is all. No, Havoc, you don't win a prize with the girl in your sig.
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Postby Maui on Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:27 pm

It's surprising they mention 'Flushed Away' and 'The Curse of the Were Rabbit' didn't do too well in the U.S. I thought both movies were hilarious!!!
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Postby Evil Hobbit on Thu Nov 29, 2007 4:47 am

More Aardman is always good news.
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"Arthur Christmas" and "Pirates!"

Postby TheButcher on Tue Apr 28, 2009 12:00 am

From Variety: Aardman begins work on toon duo - Sony to release 'Arthur,' 'Pirates'

Aardman Features has begun production on two animated feature films, "Arthur Christmas" and "Pirates!" with Sony on board to release both.

Sony and Aardman, best known for its stop-motion style of animation, made the joint announcement Monday. Sony signed a a three-year, first-look deal with Aardman Features in 2007.

"Pirates!" is based on "The Pirates! (in an Adventure with Scientists)" from the series of books by Gideon Defoe. Story will follow the fortunes of a cheerful but hapless pirate band in an attempt to win the Pirate of the Year trophy.

Pic will be directed by Peter Lord, a founding partner of Aardman and director of "Chicken Run" with Nick Park and co-directed by Jeff Newitt with Defoe penning the script.

Producer is Julie Lockhart with Carla Shelley, Peter Lord, and David Sproxton exec producing.

"Arthur Christmas," a CGI project, will reveal Santa's high-tech operation. Aardman is working closely with Sony Pictures Imageworks on the animation.

"Arthur Christmas" is directed by Sarah Smith and Barry Cook from a screenplay by Peter Baynham ("Borat") and Sarah Smith.


Producer is Cheryl Abood with Steve Pegram co-producing and Carla Shelley, Peter Lord and David Sproxton exec producing.

Aardman's three features -- "Chicken Run," "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" and "Flushed Away" -- have grossed about $600 million worldwide.
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New Wallace and Gromit

Postby TheButcher on Wed Sep 09, 2009 2:49 am

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Re: New Wallace and Gromit

Postby Maui on Tue Sep 29, 2009 12:26 pm

TheButcher wrote:From Newsarama: Wallace and Gromit Exclusive Clip


A Matter of Loaf and Death, on DVD September 22nd in the US. I can't believe I missed this. Any you folks across the pond seen this yet? More importantly, does it feature Shaun the Sheep? Is Wallace still enthusiastic about cheese or has he moved onto baked goods?

I must seek this out.
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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby Al Shut on Tue Sep 29, 2009 12:45 pm

I've seen it but I'm hard pressed to answer any questions. In my mind it somehow blends with Curse of the Wererabbit with lots of holes I can't remember. But I know I liked it.
Note to myself: Fix this image shit!
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Re: New Wallace and Gromit

Postby magicmonkey on Wed Sep 30, 2009 2:01 am

Maui wrote:
TheButcher wrote:From Newsarama: Wallace and Gromit Exclusive Clip


A Matter of Loaf and Death, on DVD September 22nd in the US. I can't believe I missed this. Any you folks across the pond seen this yet? More importantly, does it feature Shaun the Sheep? Is Wallace still enthusiastic about cheese or has he moved onto baked goods?

I must seek this out.


Its fun, very film noir, the closest thing I can compare it to is "The Wrong Trousars" meets more Hitchcock.
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Re: New Wallace and Gromit

Postby Maui on Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:31 pm

magicmonkey wrote:
Its fun, very film noir, the closest thing I can compare it to is "The Wrong Trousars" meets more Hitchcock.


Saw this the other day - it was cute! Certainly an enjoyable 30 mins. with some good laughs (damn that chick had some major cankles). I still prefer their earlier shorts: A Close Shave, A Grand Day Out, and Wacky Contraptions.
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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby jenterrier on Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:47 am

The Cat Burglar was a film first released in 1961 which starred William Witney, Jack Hogan, June Kenney and John Baer . On the other hand, cat burglar, according to my research is the movie was patterned to the real definition of the two words as one. It is a thief who breaks into homes and steals personal properties. The story revolves entirely with the ridiculous way of the cat burglar in doing what he has got.
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Re: New Aardman: Counterfeit Cat

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 03, 2010 8:51 pm

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Aardman and Sony Pictures Animation

Postby TheButcher on Mon Dec 20, 2010 4:38 am

From Variety:
Aardman charts new course with Sony - Partners build 'Christmas' presence for 2011
Peter Debruge wrote:In 11 months, Sony will release Aardman Animation's next feature, "Arthur Christmas."

That's not much time for the Bristol, U.K.-based outfit behind the Wallace and Gromit characters to put the finishing touches on its most ambitious project yet, but it also has a powerful new ally in Sony. And Sony has something to prove.

When a major animation studio finds a financing and distribution partner, it rarely has reason to change. Be it Pixar and Disney or Blue Sky and Fox, it's easier to pick a partner and stick with it than to shop around with each individual project, the way rival stop-motion house Laika must, post-"Coraline."

So it was with no small amount of hesitation that Aardman's overseers set out to find a new American backer after their split with DreamWorks in 2007 -- the end of a decade-long run that resulted in three features -- "Chicken Run," "Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" and "Flushed Away" -- and an Academy Award for "Wallace" as top animated feature of 2005.

Aardman co-founder David Sproxton is proud of those films, but says, "When DreamWorks went public, their business plan changed."

If the studio was seeking films that could earn $300 million in the U.S., Aardman wasn't the right partner.

"I think what we've learned over the years is that every nation tells its stories in its own way, and that we in Bristol find it quite hard to make a classic Hollywood blockbuster that would play to middle America," Sproxton says.

After shopping around for a compatible fit, Aardman landed with Sony Pictures Animation. An outgrowth of Sony Imageworks, the studio's vfx division, the fledgling toon group had released "Open Season" and was putting finishing touches on its second feature, "Surf's Up." That pic grossed less than $60 million Stateside, marking a setback for the studio and leading to a shuffle of execs (Columbia chief Bob Osher and Amy Pascal protege Hannah Minghella took over for Yair Landau) and a reappraisal of films in development.

The studio desperately needed fresh content.

"The conversation started with a phone call from … Howard Stringer, who had heard that we were looking for another Hollywood partner, and he said, 'Why don't you come talk to us?'?" Sproxton recalls.

So Aardman brass met with Sony co-chairs Michael Lynton and Pascal, who not only "got" what the eccentric British team needed but also offered a cutting-edge visual-effects pipeline.

"The great thing that Michael and Amy said to Aardman is they would be happy to make smaller-scale films that would be primarily for a European market," explains "Arthur Christmas" director Sarah Smith. "I think that's primarily what they expected Aardman to offer, but when they heard (our pitch for 'Arthur Christmas'), they went, 'Wait a minute, this is a big idea. This is going to work 'round the whole world!'?"

According to Osher, "It was a good fit for both sides. We were attracted to Aardman's creativity, and being connected with a studio makes sense to them." Adds Sproxton, "They're a bigger company overall. Animation's not the only string to their bow."

The relationship began with a three-year development contract -- which Sproxton calls "a prenuptial agreement" -- and was renewed earlier this year.

It's been a happy marriage so far, with two films being put into production. In addition to the all-CG "Arthur Christmas," Sony greenlit the Bristol-based "Pirates!" a mixed-media pic inspired by a series of books by Gideon Defoe.

Going in, Aardman was determined to learn from the disappointing experience of its first CG feature, "Flushed Away," which had earned just $64 million on a budget of nearly $150 million.

"We were in the process of making (the stop-motion) 'Were-Rabbit' at the time, and the idea that we could handle two films at once was an issue," reflects Carla Shelley, head of feature production for Aardman. "Though we sent Sam Fell, whose idea ('Flushed Away') was, over to DreamWorks to direct that film, we didn't support him in the same way."

With Sony, the Aardman team vowed to do things differently.

The process began in Bristol, where Smith had been hired to cook up a new slate, starting with "Arthur Christmas" -- a story aimed at answering all the questions that make kids start to doubt the existence of Santa, including how he manages to deliver two billion presents in one night (answer: by using a state-of-the-art sleigh and an army of elves).

"It's huge, epic scale," says Smith, who co-wrote with longtime collaborator Peter Baynham. "Stop-frame movies work best with intimate settings and stories, and this called for the whole world and a million elves. So it had to be CG, because that would be too many puppets."

So, even though the company had been looking for permission to make small, eccentric releases, Aardman execs were excited at the possibility of taking on something more ambition: "Funnily enough, I think it's something that we in Britain don't do enough," Sproxton says. "Since the demise of David Lean, we don't go for big scale."

Unlike on "Flushed Away," the Aardman team insisted on doing 18 months of pre-production on the story and designs in the U.K. before relocating to Sony's Culver City studios -- aka "Aardman West" -- for another 18 months of production.

"Some of the key players from the Sony Digital team (such as producer Chris Juen) came and spent anywhere from a month to a year with us in Bristol, so this time, we felt we were able to keep what we wanted of the Aardman identity, while also having Sony's involvement right from the beginning," says Smith, who was closely involved in selecting the U.S.-based animation team.

But Smith's most significant departure from earlier Aardman projects was an aesthetic one. Though "Arthur Christmas" features British voice actors and the typically absurd Aardman sensibility, "It doesn't really look like anybody else's CG," she insists. "I wanted the film to feel like the characters could only have come from Aardman, and to me, that was not about reproducing the look of stop-frame. If you look at the characters in 'Chicken Run,' none of them are cute. They're all hilariously ugly, but they're kind of charming because they just are who they are, which is losers and underdogs -- and Arthur is the same."

With a background in live-action, Smith pushed for a look that wouldn't be possible via stop-motion.

"I wanted it to be cool," she says, "so at the beginning, when we show the military operation (of Santa delivering presents), we're doing it in that Paul Greengrass, 'Bourne Identity' style. We're running live with the camera -- it's like 'Black Hawk Down.'?"

Fortunately, Sony had innovated a handheld virtual camera rig for "Surf's Up," which Smith was able to use on "Arthur Christmas."

"The hilarious thing is there are things in the movie that are so ambitious to create and render that we don't even know whether we'll be able to do them, but what we've seen so far is just fantastic," she says.

Back in Bristol, Sproxton is excited by innovations to Aardman's style.

"We're known for 'Wallace and Gromit,' but if you look at the TV commercials we do, the looks are many and various," he says. "When you have a toolbox as powerful as CG is, you'd be foolish not to use it."

That philosophy extends to the 2012-targeted "Pirates!" Though the film was conceived as a modest CG undertaking, that changed when the Bristol team built a miniature set and showed it to Lynton and Pascal.

According to Shelley, "As soon as they saw it, that was it. It had to be a stop-frame film."

With Sony's support, they assembled a huge inhouse visual-effects team to handle the water, set extensions and stereo 3D considerations (a first for the studio). "?'Pirates!" is by far the biggest stop-frame film we've ever made," Shelley says.

As custodians of the Aardman relationship, Osher and Minghella traveled to Bristol five or six times a year to check in on operations. With Minghella's recent promotion to president of production at Columbia, Osher tapped former Miramax colleague (and Minghella's old mentor) Michelle Raimo-Kouyate to help develop Sony's slate of inhouse toons, which include "Hotel Transylvania" and "Rollercoaster Tycoon."

At this point, story reels for "Arthur Christmas" have been locked for two months, and the team has less than a year to get the film out for its Nov. 11 U.K. release date.

According to Osher, "It's nice to have a fresh set of eyes (on) things, but I need her focused in an intense way on the next wave of films."

From the Aardman perspective, such executive changes are no cause for alarm (after all, Sproxton's conversations with Sony began while Landau was still heading the studio's toon division). If anything, the fact that Minghella moved up and Pascal just renewed her contract through 2015 is reason to breathe easy.

"Animated films take about 4 1/2 to 5 years to make," Sproxton says. "In the live-action world, that's half a lifetime. As often happens, the people you start these conversations with are not the ones you end up with."
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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jan 27, 2011 9:10 pm

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Re: New Aardman: The Pirates!

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 07, 2011 9:36 pm

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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby TheButcher on Sun Jun 05, 2011 10:46 pm

From Variety:
Foreign toonmakers eye U.S. market - Language, marketing costs make America a tough nut to crack
Ellen Wolff wrote:When Hollywood studios make animated features, they make them for a world audience. For example, Fox's "Rio" premiered in Rio de Janeiro, rather than the U.S., and bowed in numerous international territories before opening on its home turf. Likewise, Disney-Pixar cooked up a globe-trotting plot for "Cars 2," with the slogan, "Cars Take on the World."

But the love seems to flow mostly one-way. Few foreign toons travel to the U.S., and hits are scarce.

Brazil-born "Rio" director Carlos Saldanha, who grew up watching Disney, Warner Bros. and Hanna-Barbera cartoons from America, says animation technology and talent are everywhere, but opportunities are not. "They're behind in terms of what it takes to build production lines to make successful animated movies."

Foreign films that get modest American attention are often unconventional efforts that "happen to be animated" -- such as Oscar nominees "Persepolis," "The Illusionist" and "The Triplets of Belleville," distributed by Sony Pictures Classics, and "The Secret of Kells" from GKids.

"But films for young people have a different measure of success," says Eric Beckman, who heads distributor GKids. "Look at Aardman Animations' experience with DreamWorks a few years ago. When $150 million in U.S. box office for 'Flushed Away' is not considered successful, that's (asking films to perform at) a very high level."

Aardman, the Bristol, U.K.-based shop behind the "Wallace & Gromit" franchise, is readying two releases for Sony, "Arthur Christmas" and "Pirates." Bob Osher, who heads Sony's Digital Production division, describes them as U.S.-styled releases in terms of scope and complexity, but adds Sony doesn't want to "Americanize" Aardman's sensibility.

"We're just looking for the broadest possible audience for what they do," he says.

The support is technical and financial. The computer-animated "Arthur Christmas" used Sony's toon pipeline, and new funding for Aardman's stop-motion facilities in Britain is enabling it to shoot "Pirates" stereoscopically.

"Our collective ambition is quite large," Osher says. "So we've put money towards technologies that give Aardman the wherewithal to do new things."

Australian animation shop Animal Logic certainly parlayed Warner Bros. support into its "Happy Feet" success, but some think that such backing cost the film its local personality, resulting in an essentially American franchise. Belgian Ben Stassen of NWave Pictures says, "?'Despicable Me' (released by Universal) was made in France, but it's far more American than French." Stassen has seen the challenges of cracking the U.S. market firsthand. His stereo CG feature "Sammy's Adventures" has earned $80 million internationally, but is only now being readied for U.S. release.

"It was acquired two years ago by Universal Music Group and then it got stuck in limbo," says Stassen, who has managed to make large-scale 3D features for $25 milllion-$30 million. The challenge, he says, is marketing: "Family films are the most expensive to market. You can't get away with $10 million-$15 million in P&A. You need to be in the $25 million-$30 million range to have a chance."

That's a view shared by Martin Moscowitz of Germany's Constantin Films, whose $30 million "Animals United" is coming to America after grossing more than $80 million abroad. "Many distributors are afraid of those P&A costs. U.S. audiences are used to heavy tie-ins and merchandising on films aiming at young kids," he says. Constantin will next produce a 3D "Tarzan" with American auds in mind.

In France, this approach is the exception rather than the rule, with the industry designed to support personal, auteur visions over broad-appeal commercial fare. As one industry pro confided at Cannes, "The French are crazy. They want to do a children's film with a little girl naked drinking wine."

One major exception to that travel-averse philosophy is French "Dragon Hunters" co-director Guillaume Ivernel, who is courting the U.S. market in a major way with his upcoming "Soul Man 3D" project. With a projected budget of $50 million -- unheard of for a French toon -- the pic can't afford to be narrow in its appeal. Instead, Ivernel has crafted a "Shaft"-meets-"Blade Runner" sci-fi thriller with a father-daughter relationship at its core that he thinks will appeal widely enough to make good on that investment.

"If you make a combination between Moebius-style French animation, Japanese anime and American blaxploitation movies, then you have something for an international audience," he says.

"Soul Man" is being produced in English, but language can be a barrier. Typically, distribs must spend to dub the films into English -- easier with animation than live-action, but an extra expense all the same.

That explains the long delay between the European and American release dates of the acclaimed 2008 French toon "Mia and the Migoo," which GKids dubbed with an American cast that includes Whoopi Goldberg and James Woods.

GKids keeps marketing costs low by creating promo materials inhouse, targeting parents online, and garnering critical acclaim. "We've been profitable on every film we've distributed. We think there's a fairly substantial niche market for animated films, but you need to define success as being south of $150 million!"

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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby BuckyO'harre on Thu Jul 14, 2011 12:08 pm

Would someone please remove "The Cat Burglars" from the title so this can be the general Aardman thread?





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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 22, 2011 12:32 am

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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 22, 2011 1:18 pm

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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby TheButcher on Tue Oct 04, 2011 10:52 pm

From Bleeding Cool:
Aardman Animation’s Nick Park Is Writing A New Stop-Motion Feature, But It’s Not Wallace And Gromit
Hannah Shaw-Williams wrote:Four-times Oscar winner Nick Park (it’s probably hard to find a better introduction than that) is apparently writing a brand new feature film to be pitched to the good people at Sony, who are currently working alongside Aardman Animations on Arthur Christmas and The Pirates! In An Adventure With Scientists. During a tour of the Bristol-based studio today, Aardman spokesperson Arthur Sheriff revealed that after spending a year or so away from the film-making process Park is currently working furiously on a new script.

With plans at such an early stage there are very few details available about the film, but we can tell you that Park wants it to be made using the traditional Aardman format of stop-motion animation as opposed to CGI or hand-drawn work. The departure from the world of Wallace and Gromit is particularly interesting, since aside from Chicken Run and Creature Comforts, Park’s writing and directing credits so far exist solely in the W&G-verse.

Cracking news.
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Re: New Wallace and Gromit

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 05, 2012 11:25 pm

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Re: New Aardman: "The Cat Burglars"

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jun 19, 2014 2:10 pm

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