MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby SilentBobX on Sat Sep 11, 2010 12:22 pm

I sat here bored and decided to give some more thought to the Gremlins remake I'd had in my mind. I wonder if they'd steal this idea. Stranger things have happened. I'll try the 3 act approach in my explanation.

Act 1:

A young boy and his family move to a seemingly mild mannered mid-western town. Boy meets friends, starts to fit in along with family. Meanwhile, at a local university, where the boy's sister is a student, a man returns from an expedition with Gizmo the Mogwai. The man, whose search was funded, finds himself on the outside looking in when the university wants to dissect him, while he objects, warning them of what the locals told him about the mogwai(food after midnight, water).

Act 2: The boy's sister meets the man and they bond. The Mogwai escapes after discovering his fate. The man confides in the boy and his sister what happens when Gizmo returns to the man, police in tow, who accuse him of stealing him. Gizmo escapes again, hiding with the boy, who keeps him to himself. Boy accidentally exposes Gizmo to water, multiplies, who then proceed to morph into gremlins after eating after midnight. The boy and Gizmo barely escape the gremlins, who hide in a cave outside the town until the next night when they begin an assault on the small town and its inhabitants.

Act 3: Over the next few nights, the gremlins and their leader(Spike), begin killing everyone who they feel knows their secret(scientists, univ. dean), and go after the man, who escapes from jail and tracks the boy and his sister down to warn them. The gremlins wreak havoc everywhere, and kill indiscriminately but are beaten back by the determined townsfolk. The man learns they're hiding in the cave and decides to blow up the entrance, trapping them. The idea is that they have no cover to hide from in the sunlight being a near desert town, and if they are inside, they'll be trapped underground. After several action sequences and Gizmos help, they do this, killing all of the gremlins(trapped in the sunlight) and injuring Spike, who flees into the cave just as the explosion seals the entrance. The boy, man, and sister all celebrate.

However........the post credits sequence shows Spike crawling in the darkness and in the distance, hears the faint dripping of water, and sees an underground pool. He smiles evilly.......fade to black.

I know this is very rough and not all that descriptive, but it's a start of what I feel would be a great remake.


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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby Bloo on Sat Sep 11, 2010 10:14 pm

throw in some references to the original and you have a decent Gremlins 3 there
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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby SilentBobX on Sun Sep 12, 2010 9:10 am

I think that could be done. Maybe a replay of Hoyt Axton's final words during the first one's ending, the part about looking under the bed and all.

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Thinner

Postby aelauthor on Tue Oct 05, 2010 6:30 pm

I just watched Stephen King's Thinner - and half-way through the movie I remembered: Stephen King didn't write Thinner! (ok, so Richard Bachman IS S.K. - but that's not exactly my point.) Richard Bachman has a unique style that can be picked out from Stephen King's stuff. If you've read The Running Man, Road Work, The Long Walk...or even - THINNER...then you know what I'm talking about. As I watched this movie I noticed several things that could be updated and re-vamped to make this into the gut-wrenching classic that is RICHARD BACHMAN'S... The acting in this movie is really bad - except I can't help but like Joe Mantegna. It's not just the acting - but the dialogue! (for example: Henry Halliwell: This diet you're on, what is it? I've tried all the others, I might as well try this one. Billy Halleck: I don't think you'd like it Henry. In fact, I don't think you'd like it at all.). Wow - he REALLY doesn't think he'll like it AT ALL...does he??? Also there were too many uses of food: Billy Halleck is asked where he's going when he leaves the clinic and he says "to get take-out"...I mean - these quotes are just B.A.D.
So why bother remaking it at all? Well...if you watch the movie all the way through (I know, that seems hard during the first half hour of cliches, shallow characters, and bad acting) you'll start to see that Bachman is really much more twisted than King.

Story summary: Billy (the main character) is one of three victims of a gypsy curse...after all of the "normal" ways to solve the weight-loss problem he decides to find the gypsy that cursed him and will ask him to take it off...the old man refuses and Billy decides HE'LL put a curse on the GYPSY. Well, as we all know Billy is just a "white man from town" who has no mystic power so he has to carry out his curse another way. He calls up the criminal that he defended from the beginning of the movie (Mantegna) and asks for his help in making this little curse happen. They kill the gypsies dogs, and then stage a shootout in which they kidnap one of the gypsies (the husband of the great-grand daughter of the man who put a curse on Billy) and arrange it so that the gypsies kill him! The old man decides he's had enough trouble and gives Billy the power to remove the curse - but he can only do it by giving the curse to someone else he knows. Sounds like a problem, right? No - during the movie Billy's wife has been having an affair with Billy's doctor, so he takes the cursed pie home and lets his wife try it. She dies overnight, unfortunately his daughter also eats some pie (he was actually trying to spare his daughter) so in a moment of depression he decides to eat the rest of the pie and end his own life...fortunately the doctor shows up and reminds him his revenge isn't complete - so he (supposedly) kills off the doctor too.

Wow - this is one twisted character. You think he's a family man at the beginning but over the course of the movie he makes a best friend out of a criminal, gets involved with the threats and even a death of one of the gypsies, and then goes home to kill his family and his doctor. I would love to see a remake where the other victims of the gypsy curse get bigger roles - that way when they die off we actually care. I mean, the makeup effects were cool, and they provide a good scare - but the judge and cop had such small parts that I didn't really care when they suffered and died :0( I would have also liked to see the wife's affair played up a bit more...I wasn't entirely convinced she WAS having an affair (maybe they did that on purpose)...but I just thought that it was out of character for this Billy to kill off his family because of something that he was a little worried about - if they were to make a bigger deal out of the affair then we (the audience) would get pulled into Billy's character and his revenge is more believable. I also think there should be a bigger focus on Billy's curse on the gypsies...I thought it was an interesting idea for him to make his own curse by bringing down the wrath of this criminal guy and I'd like to see more of that.
Tie it all together with good acting/dialogue/and more suspense/emotion and you'll get a really gripping film. Oh yeah, and it should be called "Richard Bachman's Thinner"
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Re: Thinner

Postby thomasgaffney on Tue Oct 05, 2010 10:33 pm

aelauthor wrote:Story summary: Billy (the main character) is one of three victims of a gypsy curse...after all of the "normal" ways to solve the weight-loss problem he decides to find the gypsy that cursed him and will ask him to take it off...the old man refuses and Billy decides HE'LL put a curse on the GYPSY. Well, as we all know Billy is just a "white man from town" who has no mystic power so he has to carry out his curse another way. He calls up the criminal that he defended from the beginning of the movie (Mantegna) and asks for his help in making this little curse happen. They kill the gypsies dogs, and then stage a shootout in which they kidnap one of the gypsies (the husband of the great-grand daughter of the man who put a curse on Billy) and arrange it so that the gypsies kill him! The old man decides he's had enough trouble and gives Billy the power to remove the curse - but he can only do it by giving the curse to someone else he knows. Sounds like a problem, right? No - during the movie Billy's wife has been having an affair with Billy's doctor, so he takes the cursed pie home and lets his wife try it. She dies overnight, unfortunately his daughter also eats some pie (he was actually trying to spare his daughter) so in a moment of depression he decides to eat the rest of the pie and end his own life...fortunately the doctor shows up and reminds him his revenge isn't complete - so he (supposedly) kills off the doctor too.


THAT'S what happens in the movie? Why the fuck did they change it? The book's ending was sad and depressing, but not maniacal and devious. Thank fucking christ I never watched this...

aelauthor wrote:I would love to see a remake where the other victims of the gypsy curse get bigger roles - that way when they die off we actually care.


What other victims? In the book, the main character runs down the gypsy's wife while getting a blowjob. So the old man gypsy curses him.
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Re: Thinner

Postby Tyrone_Shoelaces on Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:57 am

thomasgaffney wrote:
aelauthor wrote:Story summary: Billy (the main character) is one of three victims of a gypsy curse...after all of the "normal" ways to solve the weight-loss problem he decides to find the gypsy that cursed him and will ask him to take it off...the old man refuses and Billy decides HE'LL put a curse on the GYPSY. Well, as we all know Billy is just a "white man from town" who has no mystic power so he has to carry out his curse another way. He calls up the criminal that he defended from the beginning of the movie (Mantegna) and asks for his help in making this little curse happen. They kill the gypsies dogs, and then stage a shootout in which they kidnap one of the gypsies (the husband of the great-grand daughter of the man who put a curse on Billy) and arrange it so that the gypsies kill him! The old man decides he's had enough trouble and gives Billy the power to remove the curse - but he can only do it by giving the curse to someone else he knows. Sounds like a problem, right? No - during the movie Billy's wife has been having an affair with Billy's doctor, so he takes the cursed pie home and lets his wife try it. She dies overnight, unfortunately his daughter also eats some pie (he was actually trying to spare his daughter) so in a moment of depression he decides to eat the rest of the pie and end his own life...fortunately the doctor shows up and reminds him his revenge isn't complete - so he (supposedly) kills off the doctor too.


THAT'S what happens in the movie? Why the fuck did they change it? The book's ending was sad and depressing, but not maniacal and devious. Thank fucking christ I never watched this...

aelauthor wrote:I would love to see a remake where the other victims of the gypsy curse get bigger roles - that way when they die off we actually care.


What other victims? In the book, the main character runs down the gypsy's wife while getting a blowjob. So the old man gypsy curses him.

If I remember correctly the cop and the prosecutor are cursed as well. The old man cursed everyone after Billy was acquitted in court.
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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby so sorry on Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:12 am

kalvin wrote:Movie that need to be remade is Shutter Island..



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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Nov 16, 2010 10:31 am

the book wasn't very good. the fact that scorsese made a compelling and watchable film out of it, without fundamentally changing anything in the story or characters, is further testament to his genius.
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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby magicmonkey on Tue Nov 16, 2010 11:07 am

TheBaxter wrote:the book wasn't very good. the fact that scorsese made a compelling and watchable film out of it, without fundamentally changing anything in the story or characters, is further testament to his genius.


I'll testify! Altho, lets not forget Thelma! And Dante Feretti for that matter.
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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby justcheckin on Sun Nov 21, 2010 12:43 am

The Last Airbender needs to be remade... :) mwhahahahahaha
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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby TheButcher on Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:23 am

From /film:
The ‘Star Wars’ Movie Idea Lucasfilm Should Consider: Remake the Prequels
Germain Lussier wrote:Amid all the rumors and speculation about what Disney and Lucasfilm will be doing with the Star Wars franchise, there’s one simple idea that hasn’t often been brought up. This idea doesn’t involve spinning off characters from the original trilogy nor does it involve continuing the story after the original trilogy. No, this is an idea that takes place before all that. An idea that, in today’s Hollywood and knowing the history of Star Wars, seems much less crazy than it initially sounds.

Remake the prequels.

It’s a thought previously relegated to fan forums and blogs, yet it’s becoming more plausible than ever. Not any time soon, but eventually. Right now, Star Wars fans have plenty to look forward to with J.J. Abrams’ Episode VII, Episodes VIII and IX should we get to them and any number of spin-offs or character one-shots. But down the road, maybe 15 years, when a Star Wars movie a year has become as expected as Christmas, I think people will be ready. And it could elevate the franchise to new heights.

While George Lucas’ Prequel trilogy — Episode I: The Phantom Menace, Episode II :Attack of the Clones and Episode III: Revenge of the Sith – does have its supporters, I don’t think I’m going to get much argument when I say they were a massive disappointment. The movies are simply not that good. They’re technically impressive, with some great things about each of them, but overall the scripts are a major downgrade from the original trilogy.

Before you can consider remaking them, though, there are two forces in the way. One is George Lucas, and the second is 20th Century Fox. Lucas wrote and directed all three films and, as the creator of Star Wars, that makes them 100% canon and untouchable. Also, 20th Century Fox distributed each of those films, meaning they have a financial stake in them for a long time to come.

Fifteen or twenty years down the road, neither of those things will matter as much. George Lucas is currently 68 years old. Eventually, like all artists before him, Lucas will become one with the force. As for 20th Century Fox, while they do have ownership of all six original films, outside of the original, those rights eventually revert back to Disney. That means, at some point the prequel trilogy, its locations and characters, all go back to Lucasfilm.

When those two factors change, is this really that crazy an idea? Hollywood remade Psycho, so what needs to be said beyond that? Films are remade almost every single day and the trend that isn’t going away. Remaking three successful but critically maligned films in a world where Disney wants to release a new Star Wars movie every single year seems like a smart proposition. It’s an opportunity to double-dip from successful, well-known works and, maybe, improve on them.

Improving a Star Wars movie. Hmm, where have we heard that before? Oh yeah, the Special Editions, which were followed by DVD editions and Blu-ray edits. There is certainly precedent to George Lucas’ vision being tinkered and toyed with. Not with any full-on remakes yet, true. But in fans’ eyes, the “Greedo shooting first” edit might as well be a different movie. Plus, outside of the Star Wars Christmas Special, nothing is as maligned in the Star Wars Universe as Jar Jar Binks and his films. If you can insert Hayden Christensen into Return of the Jedi, you can remake the prequels.

The question then becomes, if someone are actually going to do this, how exactly would they do it? Deepen the characters, heighten the drama and fill out the story making the rise and fall of Anakin Skywalker a more exciting, surprising and devastating turn of events.

I’m now going to lay out the story for my hypothetical remakes of the prequel trilogy.
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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby SilentBobX on Wed Feb 27, 2013 10:14 pm

Had this on my mind for a while, and wanted to try this.

Supergirl.

I know for a long time I've lamented the lack of female superheroes in cinema(good ones at least), and in keeping with that, I'm going to try and do a decent Supergirl reboot. Given that Supergirl's history is spotty(from Silver Age on down and is inconsistent at times, I'll try doing the character justice.

Here goes:

Camera pans thru the cosmos, eventually settling on the planet Krypton. We see a huge science center, many Kryptonians wandering the halls, working, going about their business(this is set just before Krypton's explosion). A communication center is brimming with activity. We see a man sitting in a chair, handling several different video and audio conversations. One of them is with Kara Zor El(Supergirl), who is aboard a small starcraft experiencing trouble. Kara is the ship's communications officer with a compliment of five(3 men 2 women). The ship has sustained damage and has only two lifepods. The crew discuss and argue about who deserves to use them, with Kara arguing heatedly with the other female member of the crew. Suddenly, Krypton explodes, hurtling the ship into space. Kara, by sheer luck, is near one of the pods. She uses it to escape.

Kara is hurtling thru space, seemingly lost. She manages to engage a hypersleep mode on the pod and falls into a fitful, nightmare filled sleep. The pod eventually crashes on earth, near the Canadian Rockies. NASA has picked up the pod on radar and sends some people to investigate. Around the same time, the second pod is picked up by a telescopic satellite and is also seemingly headed to earth.... Kara emerges from the pod, groggy, confused, but grateful to be alive. She steps out, sees the beautiful world before her, a large lake, forest, and a bright yellow sun. Kara wanders briefly, taking in the sights, before seeing a deer, which she approaches but runs off after being startled by two hunters. The hunters, angry, confront her about spoiling their kill. Kara is confused, then frightened as one hunter takes aim at the fleeing deer and fires. The other hunter mocks her and she quickly learns what they are doing. A brief scuffle ensues, in which Kara learns she has superstrength, throwing the hunters easily into the lake and breaking their rifles. She soon learns about her other powers and sees a picture of Superman in the newspaper, and has a minor flashback, indicating she knows him from Krypton. She returns to the pod and sees the military approaching it. Quickly gathering some belongings, she runs, rather quickly, falling off a cliff and learns she can fly.


The military, led by Gen. Eiling, confiscate the pod and are curious about its power source and some of the green glowing material clinging to it. Answering a call, that it looks 'similar' to one that the satellite picked up, Eiling grows concerened. He sees footprints, and orders some men to follow, who lose the trail. Kara flies for a short time, happy, breathing deeply, and feeling wonderful. Each sensation a new discovery. After a brief time, she hears a young girl crying for help. She is treed by a bear, which is trying to get to her. The little girl looks in astonishment as Kara lands, confronts the bear, and using her powers, scares it off. Kara takes the little girl back to a nearby town which is in the middle of organizing a search for her. The crowd is speechless as Kara lands and the little girl runs to her family. Soldiers from Eiling's party suddenly surround Kara, who flies off. Eiling reports the incident to a lead scientist, who is watching video from some unknown country. Smoke, ruins, and devastation. The scientist tells Eiling that they found the second pod, and its inhabitant went on a rampage, causing the devastation in the video. Turning, the scientist watches as the pod's power source is slowly removed.

Kara eventually makes her way to another city, and then finally Metropolis, which she discovers is where Superman lives, but unfortunately is unavailable. After reading and learning more about earth, she watches a news broadcast of the devastation and sees the person responsible.....The woman from the ship she argued with: Ursa. Kara is unsure of what to do, but realizes she has to confront Ursa. She goes through her belongings, and finding similar clothes, she makes her costume, with the 'S' symbol, inspired by Superman.

After confronting Ursa, the women engage in a huge fight. Ursa seemingly gets the upper hand when suddenly, she is struck by a green beam. A kryptonite beam weapon, made by the scientist and wielded by Eiling, knocks Ursa down. Kara quickly recovers but is shot by Eiling. Both women are subdued and taken into custody. They awaken in the scientist's lab, both under a kryptonite beam lamp in separate cells. Eiling argues with the scientist, convinced that Ursa and Kara are part of an invasion, led by Superman. Both women are weak, but manage to escape and continue their fight, interrupted by Eiling, again, using the same weapon. Ursa disarms him and holds him by the throat, slowly choking him and using the gun on Kara. Kara tries reasoning with Ursa, who merely laughs. All appears lost until there is a loud explosion, a collision, and then after the dust settles, we see: Superman. Ursa is now unconscious and after some exposition of where he was, offers Kara a hand up.

Final: Superman uses his Phantom Zone ray to banish Ursa, who is unrepentant and fearless as she is whisked away. Superman takes Kara to his farm in Smallville, where she will live with the Kents and learn more before she becomes Supergirl again.


Post credits:

Ursa is floating through the Phantom Zone, in a lifeless void until suddenly she sees General Zod, who offers her comfort and tells her he has found........a way out.

End.


Thoughts?


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Re: MOVIES THAT NEED TO BE REMADE

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:41 am

IF YOU’RE GOING TO REMAKE SOMETHING, WHY NOT REMAKE SOMETHING THAT DIDN’T WORK THE FIRST TIME?
Neil Turitz wrote:Now that Fox has made the announcement that Robert Rodriguez has signed on as director, they’re definitely remaking Escape From New York, which of course makes exactly zero sense, because what do they possibly have to gain from such a move? Turning an animated movie into a live action one, sure, I get that, but taking a movie that worked really well the first time around and trying to top it just because almost 40 years have passed? Seems like a fool’s errand to me.

Not that this ever stopped anyone in Hollywood from doing this kind of thing before, of course, seeing as how so much of the content thrown at us these days is a rehash of something that someone else did once before. But the thing that always confuses me is why they insist on taking things that worked really well the first time around and thinking they can do it again, only better.

Is it purely about ego? Certainly that has to have something to do with it, especially in this line of work. Same thing with the bottom line. Everyone knows at this point that the studios, if given their druthers, would put out exactly zero original content, simply because they believe it’s harder to market than previously established intellectual property, no matter how obscure that property might be.

I imagine that’s why we have remakes coming for such classic 80s fare as WarGames, Commando, Overboard, Honey I Shrunk the Kids, Dirty Dancing, Big Trouble in Little China, and Scarface, just to name a few. That doesn’t even include a bevy of others, like Sony’s Flatliners redo coming out this fall, or Warner Bros.’ It, which is technically an adaptation of a mini-series based on a book, rather than a straight remake, but you get the drift.

Actually, Flatliners is one of those movies that I would have mentioned as being rife with potential as a remake vehicle in the first place, because while the original idea was a solid one — med students temporarily killing themselves to see what’s on the other side and use it as a way to bring out their PTSD and guilt issues — the execution left something to be desired. What could have been a deep and meaningful thriller about the demons we all have to face became a standard paint-by-numbers affair that was most notable for Julia Roberts’ flowing red curls and everyone wondering what, exactly, she saw in then-fiancé Kiefer Sutherland (right then just entering his post-Lost Boys, pre-24 career nadir).

I have no idea what the remake has in store, but if it can get into some of those deeper, unexplored themes, I’m all for it, which is part of my problem with revisiting a property like Escape From New York. Seriously, do we really believe that anyone can outdo Kurt Russell in the original? Or live up to the dystopian world created by co-writer/director John Carpenter?

Like I said, a fool’s errand.

That’s why I think remakes should be limited to the Flatliners ideal. Take a movie that was okay, or mediocre, or even lousy, but which had a great idea at its heart and could be better executed, and run with that. Like, for instance, what are, in my opinion, the five best remakes of all time: Ocean’s Eleven, Cape Fear, The Thomas Crown Affair, The Thing, and The Fly. Each of the originals was fine, I guess, but when reimagined and given a new and modern spin, they became something else entirely.

(By the way, I’m not really including remakes of foreign language films, because those are sort of a genre all their own and have produced some real classics over the years. I start to get a little antsy when the remakes get remade — hello, Magnificent Seven — but taking a movie from another language and translating it for American audiences doesn’t ring my bell nearly as loudly.)

But back to the underlying thread here, I think it would be hard to say that any of the five movies listed above could be considered true classics of any genre. Yes, I know the original Thomas Crown starred Steve McQueen, but that wasn’t his best work, so I’m sticking with the Pierce Brosnan-Rene Russo remake as a superior product. It’s why I don’t hate the idea of an Alien Nation remake, which is currently in development, or redoing An American Werewolf in London, or The Black Hole. A good director could have a great time getting their hands dirty with one of those suckers, and that’s just a tiny sample.

You know what would be a great movie to remake? Heaven’s Gate.

No, I’m not kidding. There’s a fantastic story at the heart of all that mess. I’ve only seen the four hour cut of the film, not the five-and-a-half hour director’s cut that Michael Cimino first showed to his United Artists bosses, but if you read the original treatment, and cut through all the nonsense and bombast and look at the actual story Cimino was telling, it’s pretty fantastic. Boil it down to a straight two hours, maybe even two-and-a-half, and you’ve really got something.

You could say the same thing about pretty much any adaptation of a Stephen King story — there are a couple obvious exceptions, of course, and I’ll discuss this more next week — but the list of bad adaptations of the horror master’s work is long and illustrious, and could probably choke one of the creepy monsters his devious mind has created over the years.

I always thought the real-time Johnny Depp thriller Nick of Time should have worked, and probably could, given the right creative minds behind it. Streets of Fire is another one that had a terrific central conceit — a rock and roll fable set in a non-specific yesteryear — without any real logic attached to the execution. But of course, I’m obviously building up to the grand, heavyweight champion of them all, the movie I think we can agree is prime fodder for this exercise: Ishtar.

I don’t know about you, but if someone announced that Channing Tatum and Joseph Gordon-Levitt were going to remake that one, I’d be first in line. And if you try to tell me that you wouldn’t be standing right behind me, I’d check to make sure your pants weren’t on fire.

Some might argue that it doesn’t make sense to remake bad movies, but I would counter, with quite a bit of evidence to back me up, that it makes a heck of a lot more than remaking good ones.
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