Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Thu Apr 03, 2014 4:55 am

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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Thu Apr 03, 2014 2:12 pm

SONY's GODZILLA 2
Godzilla 2 was the working title of the movie which was supposed to have been the sequel to the 1998 film Godzilla, and the second film in a trilogy. TriStar's deal with Toho was to produce a trilogy of films, and a sequel should be in production within five years after the release of the first film, but the films were unfortunately cancelled after the project had fallen into development hell, and during the time that the sequels were considered to be made, TriStar Pictures' rights from Toho to use the Godzilla-character unfortunately expired in May, 2003.

TriStar's deal with Toho was to produce a trilogy of films and required that a sequel should be in production within five years after the release of the first film. In 1999 studio president Amy Pascal told Entertainment Weekly that “If a movie makes $400 million, you make a sequel. It’s that simple.” even though the studio realized the profit potential for Godzilla 2 was much lower than had been the case for the first film. So producer Dean Devlin and director Roland Emmerich began pre-production on the sequel, and a script treatment was written in 1999, but the film went into development hell because there was little enthusiasm for a sequel from audiences, theater owners, and licensees, and when TriStar didn't approve Centropolis' planned budget for the film, Devlin and Emmerich left the project.[2]

The studio considered waiting a few years before making a new movie which would be a fresh start with absolutely no connection to the 1998 film. In the meantime, Sony decided to release Toho’s Godzilla 2000 (1999) to US theaters in August of 2000, partly because a Japanese Godzilla film would be seen as a break from the American version. In the end, Sony decided not to make a second Godzilla film, and their remake/sequel rights expired in May, 2003.[3][4]
Script treatmentEdit

Tab Murphy, the writer of Last of the Dogmen and Disney's Tarzan and Atlantis: The Lost Empire, wrote a script treatment for Godzilla 2 on October 19, 1999[5][6], which is provided below:

For years it was unclear whether the project of making Godzilla 2 would start again. The multitude of fans who desired to see the film eventually grew into a cult-following which even led to some enthusaists writing fan-scripts of the film. There were conflicting rumours of the film's production for over a decade after the film's release, even after the rights to Godzilla fell out of Tristar's hands in 2003. Eventually the rights to Godzilla were obtained by Legendary Pictures, who decided to disregard the 1998 film's continuity and push forward with an entirely new remake which was released in May of 2014. The release of Legendary's film marked the final nail in the coffin for fan's dreams of a Godzilla 2, as it is highly improbable that any major studio would bank on doing a sequel to a film which has been rebooted.

Despite the sequel never coming into fruition, several elements of the script found their way into Godzilla: The Series, most notably the script's opening sequence.
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheBaxter on Thu Apr 03, 2014 4:44 pm

TheButcher wrote:SONY's GODZILLA 2
TriStar's deal with Toho was to produce a trilogy of films, and a sequel should be in production within five years after the release of the first film, but the films were unfortunately cancelled after the project had fallen into development hell


based on how the 98 film turned out, i'm not sure the word "unfortunately" is the one i would use.
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Fri Apr 11, 2014 3:00 pm

THR:
Why Godzilla Remains Pop-Culture's Immortal Monster (Opinon)
With a new Godzilla movie on the horizon, and the TCM festival screening the 1954 Japanese original, we look back at why the big, green beast continues to enthrall audiences.
In the closing moments of 1954's Godzilla, archeologist Kyohei Yamane (Takashi Shimura) predicts the future, metaphorically illustrating the immortality of Japan's monstrous icon: "If we continue conducting nuclear tests, it's possible that another Godzilla might appear somewhere in the world again!"

Test they did. "They" being the rights holders at Toho Company, filmmakers with fresh visions of beast-on-beast destruction, the global audiences who shelled out for each new installment, and the governments of the world who literally continued their atomic experimenting, fueling the bombastic, awe-inspiring, often goofy Godzilla franchise with a perpetual undercurrent of moral danger. Even seven sequels down the road, when the King of Monsters finds himself duking it out with a three-headed dragon and an extraterrestrial cyborg replica, a Godzilla movie still boils down to the frightening ripple effect of wartime technology. We're drawn to Godzilla not simply because he kicks butt, but because we made him. He's our hero and our problem.

Godzilla's franchise flexibility was apparent within six months of his first on-screen appearance. In the hands of Akira Kurosawa confidante Ishiro Honda, Godzilla (re-titled Godzilla, King of the Monsters! and intercut with new footage of Raymond Burr for its American debut in 1956) became a stark portrait of post-World War II, Japanese fears, the titular beast a slow-burn stand-in for the devastating effects of the atomic bomb. By April 1955's Godzilla Raids Again, the monster bumped chests with an oversized turtle while fending off a plot to bury him in snow.

Though Honda resisted the idea of turning his reptilian natural disaster into a spectator sport, he and franchise-stable Jun Fukuda returned year-after-year to helm Godzilla pictures, pumping out 15 installments by 1975. An impressive amount of scripting went into what were essentially vehicles for stuntman Haruo Nakajima, Godzilla's "man in suit," to go to toe with an assortment of imaginative beasts. Surrounding the kaiju Wrestlemania were sluggish stories of Earthlings grappling with the oddities of extraterrestrial invasions or undiscovered wonders of their own world. Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964) had the Shobijin, pint-sized fairy twins who guard the moth god's egg; Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965) featured the progressive team-up of American and Japanese cosmonauts battling aliens from Planet X; In Son of Godzilla (1967), scientists construct a weather-controlling system that evolves praying mantises into six-foot tall buggers (all set up for Godzilla adopting a baby).

The iconic design of Godzilla pervaded through all of Japanese pop culture. Nothing that popular can remain a grave metaphor -- Godzilla cracking the claws of Ebirah the lobster beast was a family-friendly event. Consistent repackaging kept the King of Monsters on American radars. When Toho ushered the character into hibernation, a 20-year marathon concluding with 1975's Terror of Mechagodzilla, fervor over the character endured through comic books (Marvel ran 24 issues of a Godzilla book from 1977 to 1979, pitting him against dragons, a yeti, and The Avengers), trading cards, board games, toys, and cartoons (Hanna-Barbera and Toho's co-production ran in the U.S. and Japan from 1978 to 1981). Silliness kept Godzilla from drifting into the "destruction porn" today's blockbusters embrace so readily. Young ones could mature to understand the themes of the 1956 film, but as a 10-year-old, nothing beat watching a big green lizard kick the crap out of buildings/fighter jets/mech-suits/margin doodle monsters come to life.

Maybe it was Cold War sentiment, maybe it was a longing for the prestige of the 1954 film, but when Toho revived Godzilla's legacy in time for his 30th anniversary, the approach would today be dubbed "Nolan-esque." With 1975's The Return of Godzilla Toho segued from their "Shōwa" to "Heisei" series (eras taking their names from sitting emperors of the time) and scrapped established continuity, in hopes of reigniting the series' mix of action and social commentary. The movie is, for better or worse, more of the same — which didn't play well with American audiences. Godzilla quickly returned to his role as an antihero defender of humanity in sequels like Godzilla vs. Biollante (1989) and Godzilla vs. Destoroyah (1995).

For its third "Millennium" era, Toho rebooted the series once again, bumping up budgets and costumed carnage to compete with Hollywood bombast. Savvy marketing pushed the classically-styled Godzilla: 2000 into American theaters -- selling the franchise's return from Mystery Science Theater 3000 punchline to dazzling spectacle -- but by then Godzilla lost his luster in the states. TriStar Pictures' decade-long development of an American adaptation floundered with Roland Emmerich's oversized iguana epic in 1998. Power Rangers held the attention of youngsters in the '90s and 2000s. If Godzilla nerds wanted to see monsters duke it out, they'd pick up tickets to the touring "Kaiju Big Battel." And studio blockbusters were reaching new heights; it didn't matter that they shared zero resemblance, but a man-in-suit Godzilla movie wouldn’t compete with Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings. When 2004's Godzilla: Final Wars bombed in Japan, Toho returned Godzilla to the sea.

2014's Godzilla is a labor of love for Legendary Pictures CEO Thomas Tull (this is the madman who greenlit Guillermo del Toro's kaiju throw-down Pacific Rim, after all). His passion lured Toho back to the Godzilla arena -- maybe there was a niche to fill now that superhero movies filled the multiplexes. With a budget millions more than any Japanese Godzilla film, a visionary director who speaks to dramatics that would make Ishiro Honda proud, and an excitement from global audiences to see Godzilla boiled down to his ferocious core once more, Tull's revival should make waves this summer season. And if it doesn't work, it's hard to imagine Godzilla disappearing into the abyss forever. Because the world keeps "testing" -- scientifically, politically, culturally -- and something's bound to awaken the beast.
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 26, 2014 9:30 pm

Godzilla's Secret History
Godzilla is the original radioactive superhero -- or antihero, in this case. The reptilian giant was born out of a genre of Japanese film called Hibakusha Cinema, developed in the unique cultural climate of post-war Japan.
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 01, 2014 3:30 pm

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Re: Gamera: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Sun May 11, 2014 10:24 am

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Godzilla 1998 vs Godzilla 2014 SPOILERS

Postby TheButcher on Tue May 13, 2014 2:58 am

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Re: Godzilla 1998 SPOILERS

Postby TheButcher on Tue May 13, 2014 6:07 pm

Honest Trailers - Godzilla (1998)
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Re: Godzilla 1998 vs Godzilla 2014 SPOILERS

Postby TheButcher on Thu May 22, 2014 7:59 pm

LA Times:
'Godzilla's' monstrous costars: What do MUTOs mean for the franchise?
'Godzilla's' most important costars aren't Bryan Cranston or Aaron Taylor-Johnson -- they're MUTOs



'Godzilla': 5 Things Roland Emmerich's 1998 Version Did Better
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Godzilla Reborn

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jun 07, 2014 6:34 am

SciFi Japan:
THE GODZILLA SEQUEL THAT WASN’T
An Interview with Michael Schlesinger on His Unmade Project, GODZILLA REBORN



10 Questions with Mike Schlesinger
dr film wrote:Q2. You’re a long-time Godzilla fan. Tell us about your involvement in Godzilla 2000.

Well, that’s not a short story, but I’ll try to make it so. Sony’s distribution chief Jeff Blake (whom I largely owe my career to) happened to be in Japan when G2K opened and was breaking records. Since the Emmerich version didn’t turn out to be the most-beloved film of its generation, the studio was unsure of how to proceed. Jeff felt that releasing G2K here would be at least a place-keeper and at best a make-good to the fans who felt let down by the Emmerich.

We had a screening, and there was considerable concern: the pace was slack and the dubbing was pretty dire. Jeff was having second thoughts. I assured him that with some judicious editing and a new dub it’d be right as rain. He said, “Okay, then you do it.” And just like that it was in my lap. He figured, I hope correctly, that I was the only one there who’d actually seen some Godzilla movies and would have the right handle on it. So with a release date breathing down our necks, I dove right in.

Jimmy Honore, then Sony’s post-production czar, provided me with an editor and a sound man. Toho’s local guy, Masaharu Ina, was also involved, as every single change had to be approved by Tokyo. I wrote a new script, hired a swell bunch of Asian-American actors to reloop, and worked with the editor to sweat nine minutes of studly out of the film (over 130 individual cuts) and restructuring scenes to increase the tension. We rebuilt the soundtrack from scratch, adding some new music cues (including a couple of classic Ifukube themes) and creating foley for scenes that had been played in total background silence. I even did directional dialogue in some scenes. The sound guys were brilliant and completely supportive, and very complimentary whenever I came up with a suggestion that worked. Happily, Toho (albeit a bit grudgingly at first) admitted that our version was a big improvement; so much so that they even re-released it subtitled in Tokyo, as well as a few other countries, like India. The reviews here were mostly positive (if sometimes patronizing). It made money. And best of all, I got a six-week crash course in post-production that has served me very well. Even I was surprised at how quickly I picked it up. And I have the unique honor of being the first person to put a line of Yiddish in a Godzilla movie.

Q5. There’s a legend in the film world about your long-lost Godzilla script, which was almost shot by Joe Dante. Please, relate the whole story, down to why it didn’t get made. Is there any hope for it now?

Legend? Seriously? Wow. Anyway, it’s doubtful it’ll ever get made, what with the new Warners version coming out next year. It started, as so much of my life does, with a joke. I ran into my friend Jon Davison one day; he was at Sony producing The Sixth Day. I told him about what Toho was doing with my version of G2K (as related above), and he said, “Yeah, you’re really Mr. Godzilla now.” I laughed, “Yeah, and if these guys were smart, they’d get you, me and Joe to do the next American one.” He said, “Hey, we’re there.” Later in the day, I was pondering this and thought, “Well, why not? Who better to save the franchise?” So I called them both and asked if they were interested. They were, so I went in to the Columbia production head and pitched the idea of a “Wrath of Khan”-like sequel: a modestly-budgeted, man-in-suit picture, using Toho’s effects people, but set in America with English-speaking actors. I said we could do it for $20 million. He was intrigued, but said he really couldn’t authorize it. However, if I wanted to write it on spec, they would certainly consider it if it came out as good as I said it would. That was fine by me.

So I went home and got to work. I set it in Hawaii for various reasons, among them that I’d need no tortured explanation of how Godzilla got there, not to mention the unlikelihood of any actor turning down a feature being shot in Hawaii. (My suggested tagline: “Say aloha to your vacation plans.”) I decided to follow the Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein Rule–make the human scenes funny and play the monster stuff straight. I wrote it with genre favorites in mind for the cast: Bruce Campbell, Jamie Lee Curtis, Scott Bakula, Christopher Lee, Leonard Nimoy and of course Joe’s stock company. After jokingly giving it the temporary title of Godzilla—East of Java, I settled on Godzilla Reborn, which referred to not only the franchise but also the storyline, in which he’s killed and eventually resuscitated. Sid Ganis eventually came on board as a producer as well. Everybody adored the script. It shoulda been a no-brainer.

Unfortunately, by the time I finished it, Columbia had a new production head, and he wanted no part of it. Wouldn’t even read it. It takes balls to say that to Sid Ganis, who’s a former Academy president, but he did. And there ya go. Now everyone’s too old for their parts and Warners has the franchise. A damn shame; it would’ve been a monster hit. Pun intended.
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Godzilla: 2014

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 21, 2014 8:57 pm

BAD:
Movie Review: GODZILLA Is Kind Of A Dream Come True
Evan Saathoff wrote:Speaking of the fights, holy shit they look awesome. I don't totally understand how this was achieved, but the monster violence in Godzilla manages to look both state of the art and traditional at the same time. This is especially true any time Godzilla wrestles with the smaller flying monster. It's a bit awkward and weird and stilted and amazing. This Godzilla uses fighting moves I've seen in other Godzilla movies but never expected to encounter in this supposedly more serious iteration. I couldn't believe my eyes and I can't wait to rewatch this stuff over and over in the future. Despite all the Hollywood actors and Hollywood money, this is a film that LOVES being a Godzilla movie.


BAD:
GODZILLA (2014) Movie Review: Using CGI To Make Man-In-Suit
Gareth Edwards' GODZILLA is in the grandest Toho tradition.
Devin Faraci wrote:The final battle is a masterpiece of kaiju action. I don’t know what the general audience will make of it, as it’s absolute classic monster wrestling. Some of the shots of the flying MUTO look like they were achieved with a guy on a wire, and it’s wonderful. Edwards understands the tone exactly, knows that we want wide angle shots of monsters hitting each other and grappling for dominance, not quick cuts and shaky confusion obscured by debris and smoke. When Godzilla charged up his atomic breath I actually burst into spontaneous applause. If you like these kinds of movies this scene will be worth the price of admission alone.
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Godzilla King of the Monsters!

Postby TheButcher on Fri Aug 29, 2014 6:36 am

YouTube:
Guillermo del Toro on Godzilla
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Re: Godzilla's 60th Anniversary

Postby TheButcher on Mon Nov 03, 2014 7:28 pm

WSJ:
Godzilla Was Very Different 60 Years Ago
Directors, Designers, Actors and Producers All Had Ideas on How Godzilla Should Look
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Re: Terror of Mechagodzilla's 40th Anniversary

Postby TheButcher on Fri Mar 13, 2015 8:03 pm

Terror of Mechagodzilla at 40:
The end of one era and the start of another
Don Kaye wrote:Forty years ago, 1975 brought the arrival of a number of sci-fi, horror and fantasy films that made an impact on their genres -- some good, some not so good, but all interesting and all remembered even to this day. This is the third in a series (see previous entries here and here) that will step back 40 years and take a look at each of those films on the anniversary of its release and where it stands four decades later...

Title:
Terror of Mechagodzilla

Release date: March 15, 1975

Cast: Tomoko Ai, Goro Mutsumi, Akihiko Hirata

Director: Ishiro Honda
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Mon May 23, 2016 5:33 pm

Dread Central:
Lost Fan Film Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman Might Not Be Lost Much Longer
Foywonder wrote:One of the oddest footnotes of Godzilla fandom is the strange saga of Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman, a 1983 feature-length fan film produced by former Toho filmmakers that Toho has kept buried for over 20+ years. Until this summer – maybe, when the legendary fan film might finally see the light of day; or should I say, light of full moon?

The short version of this long, sordid saga is that former Toho production assistant Shizuo Nakajima, along with several other ex-Toho employees, decided to make their own Gojira fan film pitting the King of the Monsters against a giant werewolf. This wasn’t just some rinky dink 8MM short film, either. This was a full-length motion picture with real actors, an actual script, cinematic production values, and creature suits designed by Fuyuki Shinada (20 years later, he would go on to design the monsters for Godzilla, Mothra, and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack).

Nakajima drew inspiration from Curse of the Werewolf and his love of classic kaiju flicks to craft a feature about a Japanese man transformed into a werewolf; in true atomic age fashion, he also becomes irradiated, causing him to become a gargantuan wolfman. The enlarged lycan encounters Godzilla, who’s on his own countryside crushing spree; and a mighty monster throwdown occurs.

Only one little problem: Nakajima didn’t have Toho’s permission to use Godzilla, and given how notoriously litigious Toho is about Godzilla’s likeness, they put a silver bullet in any plans for the world to ever see Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman. All that had ever seen the light of day were a handful of production stills that had trickled out over the years confirming it to be more than just rumor.

The project remained unreleased and regarded by Godzilla fandom as a “lost” film… until a few years ago, when renewed interest began thanks to dedicated G-fan Mark Jaramillo tracking down Nakajima, himself shocked to learn anyone even knew of the film’s existence outside of Japan. This lead to articles chronicling the strange history of this epic fan film for websites like Sci-Fi Japan, Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine, and even panels at the annual Godzilla convention G-Fest. Nakajima even attended G-Fest XX in 2013, presenting footage from his lost labor of love to a wildly enthusiastic crowd. Since then, Nakajima has vowed to restore the film and finally get it released. Clips from it have appeared on YouTube, and all manner of production stills have been posted on his own Facebook page.

Nakajima now seems to be indicating on said Facebook page that the film will be finished by this summer, presumably for a DVD (Blu-ray?) release, right around the time Godzilla: Resurgence opens in theaters in Japan this July. This news is not official, nor is it even confirmed if Toho has signed off on allowing it to happen. This could all just be wishful thinking on his part, or hoping that fan goodwill will help pressure Toho into making it a reality, a la the recent dust-up between Paramount and Star Trek fans that raised a million dollars on Kickstarter for their own high-end fan film.

Godzilla fans might be getting two new Zilla flicks this summer. And if they’re not, we can at least enjoy these clips from Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman and be left to wonder what might have been.
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Mon May 23, 2016 5:34 pm

One Crazy Summer
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Re: Godzilla vs John Belushi

Postby TheButcher on Mon May 23, 2016 5:35 pm

Get Ready to Crumble!
Robert Short’s Godzilla suit was first used in Hollywood Boulevard (1976), then worn by John Belushi for Saturday Night Live and while hosting NBC’s premiere of Godzilla vs. Megalon in 1977.

via Astounding Beyond Belief

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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby bastard_robo on Sun May 29, 2016 10:43 pm

TheButcher wrote:Dread Central:
Lost Fan Film Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman Might Not Be Lost Much Longer
Foywonder wrote:One of the oddest footnotes of Godzilla fandom is the strange saga of Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman, a 1983 feature-length fan film produced by former Toho filmmakers that Toho has kept buried for over 20+ years. Until this summer – maybe, when the legendary fan film might finally see the light of day; or should I say, light of full moon?

The short version of this long, sordid saga is that former Toho production assistant Shizuo Nakajima, along with several other ex-Toho employees, decided to make their own Gojira fan film pitting the King of the Monsters against a giant werewolf. This wasn’t just some rinky dink 8MM short film, either. This was a full-length motion picture with real actors, an actual script, cinematic production values, and creature suits designed by Fuyuki Shinada (20 years later, he would go on to design the monsters for Godzilla, Mothra, and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack).

Nakajima drew inspiration from Curse of the Werewolf and his love of classic kaiju flicks to craft a feature about a Japanese man transformed into a werewolf; in true atomic age fashion, he also becomes irradiated, causing him to become a gargantuan wolfman. The enlarged lycan encounters Godzilla, who’s on his own countryside crushing spree; and a mighty monster throwdown occurs.

Only one little problem: Nakajima didn’t have Toho’s permission to use Godzilla, and given how notoriously litigious Toho is about Godzilla’s likeness, they put a silver bullet in any plans for the world to ever see Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman. All that had ever seen the light of day were a handful of production stills that had trickled out over the years confirming it to be more than just rumor.

The project remained unreleased and regarded by Godzilla fandom as a “lost” film… until a few years ago, when renewed interest began thanks to dedicated G-fan Mark Jaramillo tracking down Nakajima, himself shocked to learn anyone even knew of the film’s existence outside of Japan. This lead to articles chronicling the strange history of this epic fan film for websites like Sci-Fi Japan, Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine, and even panels at the annual Godzilla convention G-Fest. Nakajima even attended G-Fest XX in 2013, presenting footage from his lost labor of love to a wildly enthusiastic crowd. Since then, Nakajima has vowed to restore the film and finally get it released. Clips from it have appeared on YouTube, and all manner of production stills have been posted on his own Facebook page.

Nakajima now seems to be indicating on said Facebook page that the film will be finished by this summer, presumably for a DVD (Blu-ray?) release, right around the time Godzilla: Resurgence opens in theaters in Japan this July. This news is not official, nor is it even confirmed if Toho has signed off on allowing it to happen. This could all just be wishful thinking on his part, or hoping that fan goodwill will help pressure Toho into making it a reality, a la the recent dust-up between Paramount and Star Trek fans that raised a million dollars on Kickstarter for their own high-end fan film.

Godzilla fans might be getting two new Zilla flicks this summer. And if they’re not, we can at least enjoy these clips from Godzilla vs. Legendary Wolfman and be left to wonder what might have been.



You can hear all about how this film was found on my little podcast:

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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby bastard_robo on Sun May 29, 2016 10:44 pm



Trailer for SHIN GODZILLA aka GODZILLA RESURGENCE
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby so sorry on Tue May 31, 2016 9:00 am

bastard_robo wrote:

Trailer for SHIN GODZILLA aka GODZILLA RESURGENCE



He should get that skin condition looked at by a dermatologist.
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby Peven on Wed Jun 01, 2016 4:02 pm

i'm waiting for the Godzilla movie where Godzilla is created by the Fukushima nuclear meltdown and ends up attacking North Korea
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jul 08, 2016 8:04 am

LONG MA JING SHEN
A LARGE-SCALED PRODUCTION WHERE A DRAGON-HORSE ENCOUNTERS A GIANT SPIDER IN A DOWNPOUR OF SOUNDS AND SPECIAL EFFECTS.

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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby bastard_robo on Sat Oct 15, 2016 2:22 am



Shin Godzilla is out in theaters this week. See it if you can. Its a damn solid Godzilla film
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Re: Godzilla: Japanese Classics or Just Crap?

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 02, 2016 1:58 am

Godzilla - The Soul of Japan
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