Hot Docs!

New movies! Old movies! B-movies! Discuss discuss discuss!!!

Dogtown and Z-Boys

Postby TheButcher on Sat Aug 16, 2014 6:12 am

Movies Now:
Jay Adams dies: Examining the legacy of 'Dogtown and Z-Boys'

Jay Adams, legendary skateboarder portrayed in 'Lords of Dogtown,' dies at 53

Jay Adams
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheButcher on Fri Sep 05, 2014 3:39 am

Telluride Film Review: ‘Merchants of Doubt’
Robert Kenner's follow-up to 'Food, Inc.' is a similarly blood-boiling look at the American spin cycle.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheButcher on Fri Sep 05, 2014 3:55 am

Starring Adam West Trailer Shows How Hard Life Was After Batman
Adam West is Batman and always shall be Batman. And while his TV career donning the cape and cowl was quite successful, the journey after it was much, much harder. The documentary Starring Adam West takes a look at the little known plight of the actor who "peaked" in Gotham.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheButcher on Thu Sep 25, 2014 6:07 pm

Fantastic Fest Review: LOST SOUL Is A Film Buff’s Dream Documentary
The director of HARDWARE and DUST DEVIL got kicked off his own film, and Marlon Brando drove it into the ground
The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996) is a shit film. You know it, I know it, hell, even the people who made it know it. But did it have to be that way?
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby so sorry on Thu Nov 06, 2014 2:04 pm



HR Giger documentary (I think its a new one...)

This guy is like a living Clive Barker/Hellraiser movie. Like watching Pinhead at home, getting ready for a dinner party or some crazy shit like that. And you know damn well that Giger has had some otherworldly kinky sex parties, right?
User avatar
so sorry
Deacon Blues
 
Posts: 15221
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 11:29 am

Re: Hot Docs! 'On Any Sunday: The Next Chapter'

Postby TheButcher on Sat Nov 08, 2014 5:19 pm

Dana Brown Shoots Daredevils in Motocross Doc 'On Any Sunday: The Next Chapter'
33 years after his father shot the definitive original, Dana Brown captures hair-raising motocross riders and their spine-tingling stunts in 'On Any Sunday: The Next Chapter.'
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheButcher on Sun Nov 30, 2014 6:29 am

User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby so sorry on Mon May 11, 2015 9:42 am

Anyone catch the Kurt Cobain Montage of Heck on HBO?

Its pretty weird, at least in the way it was produced. Its more like an art school project then a straight up documentary. LOTS of collages, animations, musical interludes, Kurt's drawings brought to life, etc.

I always had a hatred for Cobain. As a early 20s "Gen Xer" in college when Nirvana broke out, they never appealed to me musically or emotionally. Nevermind is a great album, don't get me wrong, I understand and appreciate its importance, but can anyone really say they understood what the fuck he was ever singing about? And his "I don't give a fuck about fame" attitude felt false to me. He was a raging asshole. When he killed himself and everyone overreacted, it made me hate him more.

I can say after watching this doc that I have a slightly different perspective now. He really was an asshole, I still find him to be an unsavory character, but man listening to his mother and father talk about his childhood, and how they had no idea how to handle his "over activeness", its pretty sad. They passed him around to other family members, and between each other, not having a clue how to raise him. I can see how it would have been difficult for a kid in his position to come out of puberty with a good perspective on life. He was a creative fountain, but doesn't seem like he had the proper outlets to express himself or any guideance at all from family and friends.

And of course, Courtney Love still comes across as an self absorbed bitch. The whole conspiracy theory that she purposefully drove him to suicide is most likely bunk, but she without a doubt was a horrible enabler and heavy user herself, so as much as they may have loved each other, it was doomed.

Not enough interviews or perspectives from Krist Novelschek, and Dave Grohl was not interviewed at all for some reason. I'd definetly be more interested in hearing more from their side of the story.

So its a good watch, although I could have done without all the art-school look what I can do effects.
User avatar
so sorry
Deacon Blues
 
Posts: 15221
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 11:29 am

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby Ribbons on Mon May 11, 2015 11:21 am

I watched it too. I liked those art school effects! It was interesting to see all the random crap he drew and wrote. The fact that he was constantly doped up may have contributed to his lyrics not making sense. I've never been that into Nirvana, but I thought this was pretty good. I was also confused by Dave Grohl's absence.
User avatar
Ribbons
SQUARE PEG
 
Posts: 13567
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 2:00 am

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby so sorry on Mon May 11, 2015 11:33 am

Ribbons wrote:I was also confused by Dave Grohl's absence.



I just googled...according to the filmmaker, he did interview Grohl, but a few weeks after he had to complete the film. So nothing nefarious, just timing.
User avatar
so sorry
Deacon Blues
 
Posts: 15221
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 11:29 am

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheBaxter on Mon May 11, 2015 11:54 am

besides the bits and pieces of behind-the-scenes videos and home videos and stuff like that, i didn't find this documentary too interesting. i thought the About A Son documentary from a few years ago was a lot better. it was cool to see some of his artwork and his notebook ramblings (though it took me some time to figure out these were actually kurt's writings/drawings since the film doesn't tell you that) but the animating and some of the artsy sections just go on too long and pad it out without really saying anything.

courtney's "kurt killed himself because he telepathically sensed me thinking about cheating on him" theory just confirms how much damage all those drugs did to her brain. i guess the film needed some comic relief. courtney auditioned for the role of nancy in Sid & Nancy, and didn't get it, and i've always felt like her relationship with Kurt was an attempt to live out that role in real life. luckily for her, i guess, kurt didn't live up to Sid's part and stab her to death before offing himself.
Image
User avatar
TheBaxter
Carlos Danger
 
Posts: 18583
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 5:00 pm

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 23, 2015 2:08 am

Giuseppe Tornatore Composing Ennio Morricone Documentary – Cannes
Nancy Tartaglione wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
Mandragora Group (Beyond The Hills) and Piano B Produzioni are teaming with helmer Giuseppe Tornatore for a documentary feature based on the life and work of legendary composer Ennio Morricone. Bobby Păunescu, Dragoṣ Săvulescu, George Shu and Serena Menarini are producing. Principal photography starts in August.

Tornatore first collaborated with Morricone on Oscar winner Cinema Paradiso. He is shooting interviews for the doc in several locales and filming a narrative piece alongside. Both the narrative and the interviews are designed to highlight a side of Morricone that has never been revealed. The narrative component will reconstruct key moments, anecdotes, and situations which have been essential steps of the artistic and personal path that Morricone’s life has taken.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby Spandau Belly on Thu Jul 02, 2015 9:05 am

DARK STAR: H.R. GIGERS WELT

This is a documentary that follows artist H.R. Giger in what would turn out to be his final days. We see his day-to-day life and meet his family and friends. As you can expect, he's very eccentric, and he's also very normal in some surprising ways. You get some of the standard stuff you'd expect from a documentary like this such as a brief recap of his life and various talking heads heaping praise on him, but it's the attention to his daily life makes it worth watching.

He lives in a home in Zurich that is enormous by Swiss standards. He is a hoarder and his home is a labyrinth of old books and his artwork. His previous personal assistant claims to have made some progress in organizing his stuff, apparently it was worse before. He works very steadily and even built a little rollercoaster that he rides around his yard. He continues to receive royalty cheques from Fox for his Alien designs and this film shows his family and friends amazed at how he is able to stretch money to meet his goals. We watch as Giger sets up a museum of his work and bar decorated in his style in Switzerland.

The other really fun aspect of this doc is seeing Giger interact with his fans. He signs books at the opening of his museum and several of these metalhead dudes just come up to him and strip off their clothes to reveal full body tattoos of Giger's artwork. Many of these metalheads break down into tears and wimper like babies upon meeting their idol. Giger just reacts like a nice old man giving them a conservative thumbs up.

So if you're into Giger, this is a pretty good portrait of the man and his work.
Image
User avatar
Spandau Belly
self-fellating peacock
 
Posts: 7396
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:15 am
Location: ????

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jun 18, 2016 3:45 am

The Lovers and the Despot


PULGASARI: Kim Jong Il’s Kaiju Film
North Korean president Kim Jong Il has died, and cinema has lost one of its greatest supporters - a man who wanted to make movies so badly he kidnapped filmmakers.


THE LOVERS & THE DESPOT Trailer: Here’s A Story You Won’t Believe
EVAN SAATHOFF wrote:Maybe you’ve heard the story before. A famous South Korean couple - one an actress, the other a director - get abducted by Kim Jong-il and are forced to make movies for him to help bolster his country’s film industry.

You hear a set up like that and just have to know how it ends. This film sounds like an incredible mixture of so many things: a political thriller, a romance, a prison break film, and a unique chapter of cinematic history all boiled into one factual narrative. This is the kind of documentary I'm always hoping for.

The Lovers & The Despot comes out September 23.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Hot Docs!

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jun 03, 2017 8:17 am

Cannes Film Review: ‘Promised Land’
Is Elvis Presley a metaphor for the rise — and fall — of America? Eugene Jarecki's documentary claims, provocatively, that he is.
Owen Gleiberman wrote:Documentaries about the current state of America, as good as some of them are, often have the effect of news headlines: They come and go, leaving a slight blur. But “Promised Land” isn’t like other politically and socially inflamed documentaries. Written and directed by Eugene Jarecki (“The House I Live In,” “Why We Fight”), it’s a meditation on the current American crisis (and if you don’t think we’re in one, you should probably stop reading now) that’s built around a revisionist portrait of Elvis Presley. The two elements — America and Elvis — come together in ticklish, surprising ways that expand and delight your perceptions.

If “Promised Land” has a thesis, the short version of it — it’s declared in the opening 15 minutes — is that America has entered its studly Elvis period. We’re bloated, addicted, going through the motions, coasting on our legend, courting self-destruction. Yet the question the film asks is how, exactly, we got there, and Jarecki attempts to answer it by taking every aspect of Elvis’s life and career — the kitsch along with the glory, not just the greatness but the betrayal of greatness — and holding it up to the light, as an essential facet of his being. Elvis, by the end, threw away more or less everything he had (his entire life had become a fried peanut-butter-and-banana sandwich), yet that, according to Jarecki, wasn’t a fluke — it grew out of his insatiable American hunger, which consumed the better part of him. He didn’t just lose his majesty, he lost his faith, and so, in many ways, have we.


In “Promised Land,” Jarecki takes a road tour of America in a 1963 Rolls Royce that was originally owned by Elvis. He stops in cities that figured prominently in the King’s life — Tupelo, Memphis, New York, Las Vegas — and he invites a roster of bracingly fresh country, blues, and rock ‘n’ roll musicians to play songs in the back seat. The movie has the feel of an odyssey that’s also a party, as if Michael Moore had veered off an exit ramp and into the mad carnival of pop culture. Jarecki talks to locals who are visibly desperate, with less hope for the future than they once had; he also talks to James Carville, Van Jones, Ethan Hawke, Emmylou Harris, Dan Rather, Mike Myers, and Chuck D, who famously rapped the lines, “Elvis was a hero to most but he,/Never meant shit to me” (though he seems a lot less angry about it now). The commentators evoke the mystery of how Elvis burned like a match head and then, over time, became less than.

Ethan Hawke, who as always proves to be a highly perceptive observer, targets the moment when Elvis went into the Army, because he says “It started the lying,” creating an image for Elvis that sold him as something he wasn’t. Then, of course, there were the defanged Elvis movies that Hollywood churned out like processed dessert cakes. Their utter awfulness — with rare exceptions, of course, like “Viva Las Vegas” — is a cheeseball joke that extends back half a century, but “Promised Land” makes the point that Elvis, once he signed his deal with the devil — i.e., Col. Tom Parker, his manager/Svengali/slave driver — wound up attached to the most lucrative movie contract in history. He effectively gave up his art for the money, and Jarceki rightly sees something emblematic in that.

In the early ’80s, a raging battle about Elvis got played out in the arena of rock criticism, and in the culture at large. Greil Marcus, in his landmark 1975 book “Mystery Train,” had made the case that Elvis wasn’t just a legendary rock & roller but a quintessentially grand and timeless American artist. The scope of his music — its joy and its promise, what it shook the country free of and what it created about the future — was so epic that the more you played it and thought about it and lived in it, the more you realized how much it had changed you.

At the same time, the entire music-critic commentariat came together as one to disembowel “Elvis,” Albert Goldman’s scandalous 1981 biography of the King, which was said, at the time, to be an act of cultural desecration. Goldman actually wrote brilliantly about Presley’s talent, but his crime — his sensationalist sin — was to revel in every last tawdry detail of Elvis’s addictions, his compromises, his degraded descent. The book was condemned as “pathography” (Joyce Carol Oates’ word), but in many ways the brutal honesty of its tabloid fixations placed it ahead of its time.

In “Promised Land,” Eugene Jarecki puts together both sides of Elvis: the incandescent American artist and the overblown dysfunctional financially secure with corporate-sponsored opinions. And what he demonstrates is that 40 years after Elvis left us (he died on August 16, 1977), his slow fall now seems inseparable from his all-too-brief reign. Jarecki interviews Greil Marcus, who has never lost the faith, and Marcus makes the revelatory point that prior to the existence of the United States, there had never been a political document that devoted an entire nation to anything like “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Elvis Presley, when he came on the scene, was acting that out. Elvis shaking his hips on TV, sexualizing the entire culture and doing it with that ebullient fast-vibrato croon, was the pursuit of happiness. He seemed to open that door to everyone.

Elvis the pinkie-ringed druggie, doing karate chops from the Vegas stage, was the pursuit of happiness eating its own tail. And it was right around then that America began to create the template for the society we have today, which is dominated by the twin demons of addiction and advertising. “Fake news” isn’t just fake information; it’s commercials — lies — consuming the culture of reality. And what are Donald Trump’s policies, really, but a series of reflexive hate gestures (I hate Obamacare! I hate the media! I hate our NATO allies! I hate immigrants and Muslims! I hate climate-change science!) turned into an addictive revenge thriller. He’s addicted to the hate, and his supporters are addicted to him. They’re addicted to the studly Orange Elvis.

“Promised Land” is a searching, flawed, let’s-try-this-on-and-see-how-it-looks movie. At times, it veers too close to being a standard Elvis chronicle, and at others its insight into our national neurosis may strike you as a tad ethereal. It’s an essay in the form of an investigation. Yet it’s the definition of tasty food for thought, and with the right handling there should be a modest but eager audience for it, one that’s more than ready to respond to the optimism at its core. Elvis, after all, may have lost his faith, but the difference between Elvis and America is that we still have time to get ours back.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17391
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Previous

Return to Movie Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests