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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 7:34 am
by tapehead
Peter Jackson and I both enjoyed Cabin Fever, and he often calls me to chuckle derisively about jealous Eli Roth Naysayers - douchebags every one of them.





the devil is in the details.... douchebag.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 7:34 am
by judderman
AtomicHyperbole wrote:If anyone says Cabin Fever was "fun" again I will slit your eyes open and piss in the holes.

IT.

WAS.

AWFUL.

That is all.

(all in the spirit of the thread, of course)


I'm afraid I have to agree. Eli Roth sounds like he'd be a blast to have a few beers with in some down at heel bar in Texas, but I can't stand his movies. I voted for Neil Marshall, though if I had a choice I would have voted for Alejandro Amenabar or (and I'm really surprised he isn't on this list) Guillermo del Toro.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 9:15 am
by AtomicHyperbole
Maybe I should give Cabin Fever another go.

I really enjoy self-harm.

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:22 am
by Keepcoolbutcare
what, no none of the above?

can't see any one of the listed candidates as being "the future" of horror...

unless the existential horror of being a b-movie h@ck counts.

which it doesn't.

so, sadly, I'm forced to "go with" Havoc.

again.

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:26 am
by tapehead
Its not a patch on the list you could have made in the late Eighties, is it?

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:50 am
by Keepcoolbutcare
tapehead wrote:Its not a patch on the list you could have made in the late Eighties, is it?


dread inducing atmospherics have been replaced with mindnumbing clusterfucks of MTV stylized editing.

and just the 80's?

hell, go back to days of yore, with the German Expressionists, Univsersal classics of the 30's, Val Lewton, Hammer, and the glorious 70's.

but, ya' know, I'm into psychological horror more than the "gotcha" moments, so my taste and preferences are generally not the current vogue.

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:52 am
by Chilli
The 'classic' Univeral Dracula is overrated in my opinion. Dull, uneventful, shoddy acting. Frankenstein though... that is awesome.

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:06 am
by tapehead
Yeah I'd say the late Eighties was the last time most of my favorite horror directors, and some of the brightest new Directors were largely the same dudes - I'm talking Cronenberg, Raimi, Carpenter (maybe already past his peak) Lynch - actually it's worth noting most of the all time great Horror directors didn't just make horror movies- the 'current vogue', including the prevalent 're-make mania', is gonna get worse before it gets better, IMO

I think there's promise for US Comedy Horror - a sub genre I'm not above enjoying, but otherwise I'd have to give this to Hideo Nakata
Rob Zombie would have got it for 'The Devil's Reject's' if I'd never seen a horror movie from the 1970's.

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:10 am
by Chilli
I think Carpenter was brilliant in his prime, but it's long since passed him. In terms of the future... I think we need a return to when everyone would make different style horrors really:

Raimi - comedic splatter.
Cronenburg - Psychological mind-frick.
Carpenter - Tense.

We have Roth doing the strangely funny stuff, but no-one really seems to be picking up the other sub-genres.

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 9:19 am
by havocSchultz
Keepcoolbutcare wrote:what, no none of the above?

can't see any one of the listed candidates as being "the future" of horror...

unless the existential horror of being a b-movie h@ck counts.

which it doesn't.

so, sadly, I'm forced to "go with" Havoc.

again.


Trust me, in a couple of years or so, you will be very happy with your decision...

Just ask the one other person (cough*Doc*cough) on the board who has actually read my script...

Or maybe don't...either way...the fact I put myself on the poll was only about 50% joking...the other 50% is pure, unadulterated hope and shameless self promoting...

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 5:10 pm
by darkjedijaina
Ugh, so I just finished watching Lucky McKee's The Woods. I really found it quite boring.

Bruce Campbell was in it, sure.... but, jeez. Yawn. Snore.

It was trying too hard or something. It seemed to be more mystery than horror, and even that was lame. I could tell right away what was happening, I had the story figured out from the beginning, and that's just boring, IMO.

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 5:17 pm
by havocSchultz
darkjedijaina wrote:Ugh, so I just finished watching Lucky McKee's The Woods. I really found it quite boring.

Bruce Campbell was in it, sure.... but, jeez. Yawn. Snore.

It was trying too hard or something. It seemed to be more mystery than horror, and even that was lame. I could tell right away what was happening, I had the story figured out from the beginning, and that's just boring, IMO.


Seconded...

And I didn't even make it to the end...I fell asleep...
But I know I didn't miss much because I've pretty much seen it all before...

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 5:44 pm
by ThisLifeArtificial
Love Roth...as a person. He's seems like a really cool guy but I really can't get into his movies. There so...ugh.

At the minute, I'm leading towards Marshall. But I don't really feel this generation of horror directors will revolutionise horror like Carpenter did with Halloween. I don't really think the next master of the genre has been revealed.

At the minute, were getting series of horror films, some actually quite good, The Descent, for one, some bad, most average. I haven't seen a film that has truly made me go, "Wow, movie is scaring the fucking shit out of me, in a way I haven't been before".

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 6:14 pm
by minstrel
ThisLifeArtificial wrote:Love Roth...as a person. He's seems like a really cool guy but I really can't get into his movies. There so...ugh.

At the minute, I'm leading towards Marshall. But I don't really feel this generation of horror directors will revolutionise horror like Carpenter did with Halloween. I don't really think the next master of the genre has been revealed.

At the minute, were getting series of horror films, some actually quite good, The Descent, for one, some bad, most average. I haven't seen a film that has truly made me go, "Wow, movie is scaring the fucking shit out of me, in a way I haven't been before".


Hi, TLA. Haven't seen you here before. Welcome to the Zone.

I don't normally watch horror films, though I've seen some of the classics (Halloween, Friday the 13th, etc., but not all those sequels).

It seems to me that horror is a limited genre, because so much of it seems to be about gore. And how far can you really push a splatterfest? Eventually, it seems to me, it stops being horrifying and starts being ridiculous.

Halloween scared the crap out of me because it WASN'T gory. It was a tremendous suspense film. What films in the past ten years or so have outdone Halloween in suspense? Or creep factor? As opposed to just, you know, buckets of blood?

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 6:58 pm
by WinslowLeach
I love Horror movies but I dont see some reigning King of Horror at this point. What I see alot now is alot of Extreme Gore which by itself doesnt do it for me, the directors really have to have more going on than just crazy gory sequences. It becomes monotonous and dull to me after awhile.

I think the Horror movies I like most are the ones that mix black comedy with psychological terror. They dont always have to be super gory either. Example: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 74. I like my gore too, but if theres nothing else around it, I dont care too much about it.

One of my favorite horror directors ever is Lucio Fulci. He made some of the most brilliantly stylized atmospheric horror films (and gialli) ever. He also knew how to shoot/utilize gore really well.

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:08 pm
by Moriarty
What a silly, silly question.

I am the future of horror, obviously.

Sheeeeeesh.

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:33 pm
by Adam Balm
:shock:

There are so many ways that could be interpreted.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 10:42 am
by havocSchultz
Moriarty wrote:What a silly, silly question.

I am the future of horror, obviously.

Sheeeeeesh.


We can share the 1 vote I received...(thnx to KCBC of course)

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 5:51 am
by Anti-Christ
The future of horror is independent studios, bottom line. The only horror coming out of Hollywood is the mislabeling of crap as horror.

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:59 am
by silentbobafett
I like Marshall's films.. and have read a few screenplays of this for curently unproduced films. He's pretty cool, close to being a hack. but I like his films.

HOWEVER, I was put off him as a director/person when he said in an interview (on the Dog Soldiers extras) that there had never been a decent werewolf movie. And as for the werewolf in American Werewolf in London? "Not very good"... I'm paraphrasing but, hopefully, you see why I see him in a jaded light!

Re: The Future of Horror... (Now with Severed Head on a POLL)

PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 6:58 am
by TheButcher
From /film:
‘At the Mountains of Madness’ Not Yet Greenlit; Guillermo del Toro Talks About His Approach to Lovecraft
Russ Fischer wrote:The attraction of the film for del Toro is the prospect of returning to horror, and the fact that the scale of Lovecraft’s monsters should keep the movie firmly rooted in the genre.

Because the proportion is so big. When the monster has a dimension that allows you to humanize it, that’s the route I usually want to go. The cosmic proportions of the Lovecraft horror are so immense, it forces you to find humanity in other aspects of the tale. You can keep the monster inhuman, remote and scary, which is a great benefit.


And his claims about the realization of those monsters is, appropriately, also on a grand scale.

The way the creatures are rendered and done is going to bring forth an aspect of Lovecraft that has not been done on live action films. Part of my speech was, I’m putting all the chips I have accumulated in 20 years as a director, betting them on a single number. This is not just a movie and then move on to the next. It’s do or die time for me. Cameron does his movies like that every time and I find it surprising the way people judge success in retrospect, like, of course, I would have done that. Avatar was the largest gamble, again, so were Titanic and Terminator 2. I love that type of filmmaker, with those gigantic stainless steel balls, Alec Baldwin-style in Glengarry Glen Ross, fucking clanking together. You can’t explain success in retrospect.

Re: The Future of Horror... (Now with Severed Head on a POLL)

PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:43 pm
by Pacino86845
Since we're talking about horror...

John Carpenter's "back" with The Ward, AICN has an early-ish reader review

And what the hell's Del Toro talking about? Buried? Never heard of it! Oh, that movie where the teaser is all in the dark except for three seconds of a dude screaming while sitting in a box ostensibly buried beneath the earth?

AICN's got a review for that too!

Both seem to be mixed bags.

Re: The Future of Horror... (Now with Severed Head on a POLL)

PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 2:40 pm
by so sorry
Pacino86845 wrote:And what the hell's Del Toro talking about? Buried? Never heard of it! Oh, that movie where the teaser is all in the dark except for three seconds of a dude screaming while sitting in a box ostensibly buried beneath the earth?

AICN's got a review for that too!


just read that review, which was short on content and long on spoilers! Beware!

Re: The Future of Horror... (Now with Severed Head on a POLL

PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:56 pm
by Leckomaniac
Speaking of Buried, how about a review and interview by the fantastically thought provoking Sean (ignore their spelling) Lechowicz!


Review

Interview

For those not in the know, this is my little brother and newly crowned film critic for his college!

Re: The Future of Horror... (Now with Severed Head on a POLL

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2016 9:57 am
by so sorry

Re: The Future of Horror... (Now with Severed Head on a POLL

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2016 12:00 pm
by TheBaxter
Havoc Schultz's Halloween

i'd pay to see it.