Superman

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Superman

Postby TheButcher on Thu Apr 22, 2010 8:55 pm

From Newsarama:
Ilys Salkind Revisits Superman: The Movies @ WW: Anaheim
Tom McLean wrote:Ilya Salkind is one of the men behind the Man of Steel.

As executive producer, along with his father Alexander, Salkind told fans at Wizard World Anaheim Comic Con about the making of the seminal superhero films “Superman: The Movie,” “Superman II,” “Superman III” and more.

But Salkind began by discussing the character’s most recent movie outing, Bryan Singer’s 2006 release “Superman Returns,” which both paid tribute to the 1978 original and sparked controversy for its angst-ridden treatment of the character.

“I thought ‘Returns’ was a good movie, but the problem is it was similar very much to the first film,” says Salkind. “And also the character was a little bit different. He was a little too broody. And Superman should be kind of an up character, not like Batman or Spider-Man. They’re more complicated.”

When asked how he would proceed with the franchise today, Salkind said it would be important to set it in the current day and start over. “They should literally start from scratch, forgetting the previous story.”

Salkind went into some details about Superman projects that never saw the light of day. After producing the first three Superman movies — the Salkinds leased the rights to the character to another company that made “Superman IV: The Quest for Peace” — the “Supergirl” movie and the “Superboy” TV show, interest in the character was low.

“We came up with a script where we had Superman die,” he says. And of course the character would be reborn in the film too, so it was to be called “Superman Lives.”

Salkind suggested a connection between that script and the events in the comic books a few years later, where Superman was killed.

“The politics between Warners and DC and the Salkinds were very difficult because it wasn’t their idea and they were releasing the movie, so it was a very difficult situation,” he says. “They were happy with the success, but after ‘(Superman) IV,’ they would I say made it harder and harder for us to come back and make ‘(Superman) V.’”

Answering a question about merchandising related to the first Superman, Salkind says there was a lot of it, but there were some issues.

“We had tie ins with Warner Books, we had music with Warner Records and posters. We had merchandising as well,” he says. Salkind admits there could have been more for the first film, and that there were some complications because the movie versions of the characters were licensed separately from the comic book versions.

Salkind related some of the difficulties that surrounded the making of the first two Superman movies in particular, with the first film going so far over budget and over schedule that it missed its original summer 1978 release and was pushed back to Christmas.

Of the disputes with director Richard Donner, which lead to his leaving the project partway through the making of “Superman II” and being replaced by Richard Lester, Salkind had his own take on things.

“Mainly what happened is that Dick Donner started acting, after the enormous success of the first film — which took everyone by surprise — started saying he’d only do the second his way,” Salkind says. This included several unkind comments to the press, including Donner saying he would not make a sequel with producer Pierre Spengler and directly insulting the Salkinds.

Salkind said they had no choice but to replace Donner and it was not an easy decision to make. “It would have been much easier to keep Donner,” he says. “Taking another director was much more difficult than it seemed.”

The approach to the movie was to always make it believable — a goal made clear in the poster tagline of “You’ll Believe a Man Can Fly” — as opposed to the overall camp of the Adam West “Batman” TV series. “The first thing I said is you have to make it real, you have to believe it, you have to laugh with them, not at them.”

Casting the role of Superman — which eventually went to unknown actor Christopher Reeve — was a long and difficult process. The main battle was over whether to cast a known star in the role, which the financial backers preferred, or an unknown.

Among the unusual candidates were Salkind’s ex-wife’s dentist, and former Olympic decathlon champion Bruce Jenner, who did a screen test. “He looked good, but he came out (looking) pretty young, like 22 or 24. Everyone’s vision of Superman is more like 29, from the comics.”

More well-known actors considered for the part included Sylvester Stallone, who Salkind says was “a little bit difficult to imagine” in the role, as well as James Caan, Burt Reynolds and Robert Redford.

“After meeting a lot of actors, such as Jon Voight, we even met Neil Diamond — don’t ask me why — I knew in my heart of hearts it had to be an unknown,” Salkind says.

It was getting established actors for the other parts that really got the movie going. Salkind says they offered the part of Superman’s father Jor-El to Paul Newman, who turned it down and regretted it after seeing how much money they ended up paying Marlon Brando to do it.

Casting Brando instantly gave the movie credibility, Salkind says, with Hackman agreeing almost immediately after the news was announced to play Lex Luthor in the film.

Salkind says Brando and Hackman were on board the film before Donner, who was chosen to replace James Bond veteran Guy Hamilton. The production had to choose between Hamilton and Brando because of issues each had in the locations of the studios that were being considered for making the film. Hamilton could not work in England because of a tax dispute and Brando could not work in Italy because a warrant had been issued for his arrest after the release of the controversial film “Last Tango in Paris,” Salkind says.

The replacement was a choice between Mark Robson, who directed the smash hit “Earthquake,” and Donner, whose film “The Omen” was really impressive, Salkind says.

Casting Reeve was a difficult process as Salkind says everyone simply thought him too skinny to play the Man of Steel. The production schedule eventually forced them to cast Reeve in the part, and it worked out better than they imagined, Salkind says.

Asked which other comic book movie he likes, Salkind says “Iron Man” and “Spider-Man” were good, as was Tim Burton’s first “Batman” film with Jack Nicholson playing the Joker. He also really likes the new Batman films, especially “The Dark Knight,” and is pleased to hear that its director, Christopher Nolan, may play a part in future Superman films because he brings to projects the passion you need to make a good movie.

“When you have producers, directors or actors who are not really excited about a project, it shows,” he says. “Something is missing on the film.”

Asked about any lost material, Salkind says he can’t think of any. “I think it’s all out there, but then every three weeks someone finds something new,” he says.”
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Re: Superman

Postby ReynardCity on Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:32 am

Neil Dimaond: "You bet your balls I'm Superman!"

Robert Redford: "You keep thinking Lex, it's what you're good at".

Jon Voight: "Hey I'm flying here!"

James Caan- Well his audition was due to be outside a toll booth...
"It's a bit like 90's Frank Miller...until you get to the slapstick fist fights" David Reynolds UEA Headlights on Reynard City Issue 12

http://www.reynardcity.co.uk
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Mon Jun 28, 2010 10:11 pm

From Newsarama:
Cary Bates On SUPERMAN 5
The writer talks in detail about the ultimately-never produced film he wrote, "Superman V: Superman Reborn"
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Re: Superman

Postby Peven on Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:58 am

another superfluous thread just taking up space
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Sat Nov 06, 2010 1:56 pm

Images of the Costume Sculpts from Tim Burton’s Failed Superman Adaptation, SUPERMAN LIVES

From Moviehole:
What would Dougherty’s Superman sequel have been?
Clint Morris wrote:Moviehole spoke to “Superman Returns” co-writer Michael Dougherty this week (on our weekly podcast) who, although never officially onboard to pen the libretto for the follow-up, discusses what he might have done had he gotten the chance to.

Just two years ago, “Returns” director Bryan Singer was developing and planned to direct a sequel to the 2006 film. The first to admit that his first Man of Steel movie was a “romantic movie”, Singer promised a more action-heavy outing next time round.

‘’The first one was a romantic film and a nostalgic film,” he said in a 2008 interview. “I’ll be the first person to own up to that without making any apologies for it. I knew it was going to be that from the outset. And now that the characters are established, there’s really an opportunity to up the threat levels…Clearly there’ll be a body count [laughs]. From frame one, it will be unrelenting terror!”

Warner Bros never officially greenlit Singer’s follow-up though, nor had they assigned Dougherty and co-writer Dan Harris the task of scribbling down a story for it.

“There was never any official deal for the second one”, Doughety tells The Hole Cast. “There was always talk and whispers and stuff but nothing ever got off the ground.”

Had he gotten the call, the writer (now director; he helmed “Trick R’Treat”) says he would’ve introduced “Other Kryptonians – I’ll be purposely vague about that” into Supes’ world.

These Kryptonians “wouldn’t necessarily be evil right off the bat”, says Dougherty, “That’s too easy and cliché. I don’t think people just show up and they’re evil. In my mind, if the Kryptonians really were a space-faring race – which they obviously were – then it would only make sense that there would’ve been colonies and off-planet missions. So yeah, the possibility of other Kryptonians making their way to Earth seemed like a pretty big one in my mind.

“I think it’d be interesting to see how these other Kryptonians show up, land and have all these powers and [have to learn] how to adapt to them – when Clark got to grow up with [the powers]. Ya know… if you woke up with super powers tomorrow I think you’d have a pretty tough time adjusting to them”.

Dougherty might have also written “certain other classic villains” into his sequel.

“Brainiac was always interesting”, he admits.

One gets the impression that Dougherty really wanted a shot at penning the sequel , if only to right some of the wrongs of “Superman Returns”.

“ I feel like a lot of the stuff that we had taken out [of ''Superman Returns''] – either stuff that we had shot and got cut, or stuff that was cut from the script – could have helped [the film] more. I see all the potential that it had – I love action, so I wanted action, and I was the guy in the room who kept whining about wanting a super villain”.

Despite the disappointment in regards to the film, Dougherty has kind words for Brandon Routh, his film’s Superman, and believes there’s a possibility we mightn’t have seen the last of his Man of Steel. Regarding rumours that Routh may get another shot at playing the character in Zack Snyder’s “Man of Steel” (due 2012), Dougherty says “I’m sure they’ll talk.. at least I’d like to think so”.

To hear the whole interview with Dougherty, who talks a little about the “Giant Robot Movie” with he’s making with Robert Zemeckis and his involvement in a flick that’s roots lie in a “Fairy Tale”, check out this week’s Moviehole Hole Cast.


From io9:
Unused concept art of Kal-El's costume and Doomsday from past Superman movies
Cyriaque Lamar wrote:Costume and special effects designer Steve Johnson (who recently unveiled photos of Tim Burton's sparkling Superman suit) has now posted costume art from Superman Returns and J.J. Abrams-scripted Superman Fly-By. Check out art of a revamped supersuit...and Doomsday.

Fly-By, which was about a war between very not-dead Kryptonians, apparently featured a more alien supersuit (it's somewhat Superman One Million), and it looks like Singer had considered using Doomsday at some point. In any case, it's always awesome to see never-was designs like this.



McG's Superman:
Mc.G's Superman Movie Suit by ~BroHawk
Superman Movie Suit color by ~BroHawk

From Bleeding Cool:
Steve Johnson’s Doomsday Designs For An Unmade Brian Singer Superman Film
Last edited by TheButcher on Sun Dec 05, 2010 6:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Sat Nov 06, 2010 4:53 pm

Tom Mankiewicz Talks Superman
The late, legendary screenwriter on his work for the Man of Steel



From IESB:
What Almost Was: Bryan Singer's The Man of Steel Storyline
Zack Snyder is just months away before he goes into production of the Chris Nolan produced The Man of Steel, A.K.A. Superman Begins or Superman Rises or was it Superman Returns Again? But before Zack and Chris came aboard Bryan Singer did have a sequel planned for his Superman

Returns. So even though his final vision for his Superman Saga will never be seen we can tell you what a planned storyline was going to be.

It's actually a shame that fans have not yet seen the complete version of Superman Returns and one would hope that WB would one day release the complete film on Blu-Ray.

From larger sub-plots including Kal Penn's character Stanford manipulating Superman's return to Krypton, his arrival to Krypton and his return back to earth. That complete movie adds another 30 minutes plus to the film and for fanboys like me, we would watch it. Actually I did see that movie but that's for another article.

Some of our readers might not be up to speed on the bigger story of Superman Returns, so we will shed some light where we can.

So what did Bryan and his writers have in mind for the sequel? Let me be clear, Singer never had a chance to get his script completed, there was a couple different outlines that were done during the production of Superman Returns but the one we are going to talk about in this article was the one that most likely was going to get a full script treatment.

Superman: The Man of Steel

TMS started just a few years after the incidents that we saw in Superman Returns. Kal-El is doing what Superman does best, Lois Lane is raising her kid Jason, who of course is Superman's child and the world is getting use to having Superman back.

Now there are storyline threads that go back to Superman Returns, one is the on going plot of Superman's original reason of going back to Krypton. He has always wondered if he truly is the last Son of Krypton.

Remember new Krypton that Lex created with crystals he stole from the Fortress of Solitude and Kryptonite that Supes launched into to space that nearly killed him?

So new Krypton continues to grow in space and has become an almost perfect sphere. It is now the size of a small moon.

Besides giving Humans something to admire at night, Earth new satellite has also brought some unexpected attention from a galaxy far, far away.

A massive spaceship arrives Earth's orbit, Superman flys up to meet the spacecraft and we are introduced to our out of this world visitor.

Superman quickly finds out that our visitor is also a Kryptonian survivor who has been traveling the known galaxies and was able to detect Kryptonian technology thanks to our new green/black satellite that has started to orbit the Earth.

Superman finally has found a Kryptonian buddy and starts showing him around the planet, a planet full of problems, disease, famine, crime and nations at war with each other.

Our new Kryptonian friend asks Superman why, with all his power, is he not changing the world for the better. Why is he not getting rid of famine, disease and war? Of course fans know that Superman has always been told, or better said instructed, not to interfere with Earth's development.


Superman explains that he is not allowed to interfere but his Krypto buddy tells him that with their powers they are required to "interfere," Superman disagrees.

Krypto buddy decides to take charge and starts "interfering" from day one. One of the first things that he does is get involved in a political mess that is heating up between two third world nations.

War breaks out between these two nations but before any real battle breaks our Krypto buddy interferes and lays waste to these two Armies.

He declares to the world that he will not allow anymore wars and/or the destruction of our planet. He is declaring a "War Free" planet and for those who disagree he will have to deal with them.

The major nations of the planet applaud his actions and all agree to an immediate worldwide peace. In return he promises to share technology, fight hunger, famine and disease.

The population of the world rejoices and any small pockets of resistance is quickly squashed by Krypto buddy or even the world governments.

Superman has now become a pariah, the way the world sees it, he has been here for years and had kept technology that could have saved many of the worlds problems.

Superman starts getting a bit suspicious of Krypto buddy and decides to go talk to him. He goes to his spaceship and has a revelation. This massive ship is full of hundreds if not thousands of identical bodies aboard, yep, clones of Krypto buddy, in stasis.

So Superman digs a bit more inside the "computer" system, which is familiar to him since it's Kryptonian technology just like the Fortress of Solitude.

Superman finds out that Krypto buddy is actually an artificial intelligence from Krypton that has evolved since the destruction of their world.

He escaped Krypton just like Kal-El did and his real name is Brainiac. He has been going from planet to planet, taking their technology, helping these worlds reach a relative perfection and then he destroys them and moves on.

Superman also finds out that he was actually responsible for the destruction of Krypton and tries to warn the leaders of the world but is confronted by Braniac. A massive battle ensues and Superman is about to defeat his foe but right just before Brainiac downloads his conscience into one oh his other clones.

Superman realizes that he must destroy this massive ship along with all the clones aboard. After another massive battle he is able to disable the ship, destroy the clones and the new Braniac but right before the ship is destroyed the Braniac main frame does a local search for another body that he could download in to, it has to be Kryptonian, and he finds another one on Earth, Superman's kid
Jason White.

So Brainiac uses Kryptonian technology and beams/download itself into Jason's body and this causes causes him to age and grow into a full adult but with Brainiac in complete control.

Superman realizes what just happened and rushes to confront his very own son who is now possessed by Brainiac.

Is Jason still there or is it all Brainiac? It's all Braniac and Superman knows what he has to do, he must defeat Brainiac at all costs or the planet and it's inhabitants will be doomed.

It's a battle between two gods but Superman has already been run ragged and beat down pretty bad in his previous battles of the day. Brainiac has the upper hand and Superman is trying to not to do any permanent damage to Jason's body.

Every time Brainiac is defeated in the past he simply tries to download to another clone and leaves that body completely brain dead but with no other bodies left, will Jason survive? The answer in no.

There is a Christ like metaphor here. Superman has to sacrifice his own son to save humanity.

There are still plenty of holes left in this story, we were not privy to all the details but this is the bulk of the info we received.
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Re: Superman Blu-Ray Anthology

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 02, 2011 3:19 pm

Superman Blu-Ray Anthology Offically Announced for US Release
Superman Returns (2006)

Disc #7

* Superman Returns
o Requiem for Krypton: Making Superman Returns

o Pt. 1 Secret Origins and First Issues: Crystallizing Superman

o Pt. 2 The Crystal Method: Designing Superman

o Pt. 3 An Affinity for Beachfront Property: Shooting Superman- Superman on the Farm

o Pt. 4 An Affinity for Beachfront Property: Shooting Superman- Superman in the City

o Pt. 5 An Affinity for Beachfront Property: Shooting Superman- Superman in Peril

o Pt. 6 The Joy of Lex: Menacing Superman

o Pt. 7 He’s Always Around: Wrapping Superman

* Resurrecting Jor-El
* Deleted Scenes including the never-before-seen original opening to Superman Returns
* Bryan Singer’s Journals – Video production journals
* Trailers
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Re: Superman

Postby RogueScribner on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:24 pm

Woo hoo! :mrgreen:
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Re: Superman

Postby Leckomaniac on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:31 pm

But I already bought Superman Returns on Blu-Ray! Damn.
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Re: Superman

Postby DennisMM on Sat Apr 02, 2011 10:41 pm

Guess I'll have to buy a Bluray player and rent that puppy, if Netflix has it. Or pirate it.

Didn't say that.

Peven wrote:another superfluous thread just taking up space

Another superflous bitter individual just taking up everyone's time.
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 28, 2011 2:45 am

From THR:
Hollywood Heist: How a Burglary May Impact the Future Of 'Superman' (Analysis)
Did Warner Bros.' arch-nemesis make a legal error? And why superagent Ari Emanuel has been deposed in the billion-dollar battle for the Man of Steel

Eriq Gardner wrote:The billion-dollar battle over who controls the future of the Superman franchise is now in its second decade. But one story that hasn't been fully told is the heist of documents from Marc Toberoff, the legal adversary and arch nemesis of Warner Bros., who has been fighting the studio over rights to the Man of Steel for years.

The story might make a good John Grisham novel. After sensitive documents were taken from Toberoff a couple years ago and sent anonymously to Warner Bros., the heist became the subject of a probe by federal prosecutors, leading to a rather extraordinary decision Wednesday by a United States magistrate judge.

First, some background.

Toberoff represents the estates of Superman co-creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, who for the past decade have been attempting to terminate copyright grants over their early work, which includes some of Superman’s defining characteristics, such as his costume, Clark Kent and his origin story. They've been very successful. For example, In March, a federal judge handed the Siegel estate partial summary judgment affirming Siegel's termination. The dispute may now be headed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Once that happens, if things go well for the Siegels and Shusters, they might be able to effectively control the Superman franchise (or at least a significant part of it) as early as 2013. Warner Bros. would arguably no longer be able to make new Superman movies, which would be unfortunate considering the studio is spending hundreds of millions of dollars on a Superman "reboot" from director Zack Snyder and producer Christopher Nolan.

Last year, Warner Bros. sued Toberoff for tortiously interfering with its rights, claiming he engineered an improper arrangement between the Siegels and Shusters not to make any deal with the studio.

At the time the lawsuit was announced, Toberoff put out a statement that hinted at some shenanigans: "Warner oddly attached to their complaint an anonymous, inadmissible letter spewing unsubstantiated and unattributed accusations against Mr. Toberoff," he wrote in the third person. "The anonymous letter was supposedly included with a large pile of privileged documents that were brazenly stolen from Mr. Toberoff's law offices and mysteriously arrived at Warner Bros.' doorstep in the midst of this billion-dollar litigation."

All of that is true. We've confirmed it.

A declaration Toberoff later gave identified a perpetrator. The theft of those documents came from "a disgruntled attorney" employed by his own firm. That lawyer (whose name we've decided to withhold) allegedly called all of Toberoff's clients in an attempt to win their business with reduced fees. It didn't work, so the alleged culprit gave Warner Bros. some ammunition to destroy Toberoff.

After the documents were taken, what did Toberoff do?

He called law enforcement, which launched a criminal investigation.

Federal prosecutors, buttressed by grand jury subpoena powers, then asked Toberoff to identify the precise nature of the documents stolen from him. Toberoff talked. (Legal scholars can debate the wisdom of such a move. More on that in a bit.)

And after the documents were delivered, what did Warner Bros. do?
The studio returned the cache of documents, although a judge let it keep the aforementioned letter, which included a key timeline of Toberoff's dealings over the years. Did anybody at the studio peak at the documents? Were copies made? That's hard to know for sure. But Warner Bros. knows some of Toberoff's secrets, which likely influenced the decision last year to sue Toberoff for tortious interference.

One of those documents is a letter dated May 13, 2003, from Michael Siegel, son of Jerry, to his half-sister, Laura Siegel Larson, who now is in charge of the estate after her mother's death. According to sources, Michael Siegel was never close with his father, but as a member of the family was due a certain share of the proceeds from the outcome in the Superman case. Toberoff is said to have tried to bring Michael Siegel on board, but instead was rebuffed.

Instead, Michael warned Laura about getting involved with Toberoff.

In his letter to his half-sister, he describes Toberoff as a "mysterious billionaire" who was teaming with super-agent Ari Emanuel at WME on a secret agenda to control Superman for themselves. The letter contains some details about Toberoff's dealings and many disparaging characterizations of Toberoff. Interestingly, the letter's language seemed to become the basis for the cover document that Toberoff's ex-associate sent Warner Bros. with those heisted documents.

Ever since Warner filed the lawsuit against Toberoff last year, the studio and its ligitator Daniel Petrocelli have been trying to obtain all of the previously-stolen documents. The studio also tried to attain documents containing a "consent agreement" between the Siegel and Shuster estates not to independently do business with Warners, plus a formula for how the two estates will share proceeds on Superman were they to successfully terminate Warners' rights to the lucrative franchise.

Warners' first attempt to attain those documents through legitimate channels failed.

United States Magistrate Judge Ralph Zaresky ruled that the documents were protected by attorney-client privilege. But then, Warners got its hands on Michael's letter -- legitimately, this time -- which it waived around to the judge as a smoking gun that Toberoff was up to bad stuff. Plus, there was that little matter of what Toberoff had told federal prosecutors.

On Wednesday, Judge Zarefsky ruled that Warners should have access to those previously stolen documents.

He based the decision on the fact that Toberoff had already disclosed the nature of those documents to law enforcement authorities who were investigating the theft. In other words, Toberoff became victimized twice by the burglary of those documents. Judge Zarefsky found that Toberoff "could have responded to the subpoena by standing on [attorney-client] privilege," but didn't.

In making the ruling, Zarefsky noted that the Ninth Circuit has never addressed the issue of whether stolen documents in a criminal investigation could be used in a civil matter.

Contacted for comment, Toberoff says he's considering appealing the decision to federal judge Otis Wright, who oversees the case.

Assuming Warners gets the go-ahead, it believes it will now have documents that purportedly show what it has suspected all along -- that Toberoff persuaded the Siegels and Shusters to act in concert and deprive the studio of Superman rights.

This doesn't necessarily mean that Toberoff did anything wrong. It's more than possible that a judge will see Toberoff's work as garden-variety client solicitation rather than a shady business arrangement, and it's also reasonable that a judge will see the Siegels and Shusters teaming together as nothing more than some form of collective bargaining unit.

We'll see.

In the meantime, though, Warners gets access to evidence to help support its arguments against Toberoff. Plus, the studio continues to make life difficult for him.

But the studio isn't getting everything it wants. For example, Petrocelli wanted to explore the full nature of the relationship between Toberoff and Emanuel (and indeed has deposed Emanuel in this case, we've learned). But the judge is only making Toberoff produce documents pertaining to Superman, Superboy, the Siegels and the Shusters.

As they say in the comics business, to be continued...
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Sat May 28, 2011 2:48 am

From Variety:
Can Superman be split in two? - Warner, DC, heirs should work together
Ted Johnson wrote:Warner Bros. is hoping that Zack Snyder can do for "Superman" what Christopher Nolan did for "Batman." But the studio's real-life tangle over the rights to the Man of Steel risks resembling another Nolan narrative: "Inception."

The way things are going, less than a year after Snyder's "Man of Steel" is released in 2012 the rights to a significant part of the early Superman lore will revert back to the heirs of creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster.

The Siegel and Shuster estates could wind up owning some parts of the Superman story while DC Comics owns others. The estates could get Superman's blue leotard, red cape and boots, plus an ability to leap tall buildings while DC retains villains like Lex Luthor plus Superman's ability to fly.

The question is: Could each party proceed with a subsequent project without the other's involvement?

In theory, come 2013 auds could see two parallel versions of the Man of Steel ramp up. In practice, that looks pretty unworkable.

Setting this potential scenario in motion were a series of rulings in 2008 and 2009 by U.S. District Judge Stephen Larson, who ruled that Siegel's heirs had successfully reclaimed their share of the copyright to Action Comics No. 1, which marked Superman's 1938 debut; Action Comics No. 4; and other early depictions of the character and storyline. (Shuster's heirs are on a separate timeline that begins in 2013). Larson was acting on a provision of the 1976 Copyright Act that allows authors to regain the copyrights to their creations after a certain period of time, subject to a series of intricate conditions.

Among those conditions is that the works can't have been made "for hire," since those are exempt from such "rights termination," and it's a reason underlying Larson's ruling that the Siegel heirs don't own the Man of Steel outright; he found that Siegel's work as an employee of DC from 1938-43, as the character's mythology was still being established, remained under the ownership of the publisher.

While the "Superman" creators' heirs stand to hold important rights to the character, they don't have the trademarks, which would pose a significant limitation on marketing and merchandising. And their reclamation of the copyright applies only to the U.S., so international rights would remain in the hands of DC.

For its part, come 2013, DC could still exploit the Superman projects it's already made, but under the Copyright Act, the company could not create new "derivative" works based on Action Comics No. 1 and other properties held by the heirs. Presumably, more sequels would mean more legal land mines.

This is where things get a bit bizarre.

In a recent article published in the Columbia Journal of the Law & the Arts, Anthony Cheng writes that 7th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Richard Posner's decision in Neil Gaiman's suit against Todd McFarlane "could provide the rationale for both parties to continue legally exploiting" Superman. Posner determined that Gaiman's "Medieval Spawn" was "sufficiently distinct" to justify a separate character copyright from the original Spawn.

Along this line of reasoning, one way to settle the Superman dispute would be to "split the character in two -- a 1938 Superman and a Modern Superman -- and allow both sides to create new works based on their versions," Cheng writes.

Moreover, because both sides would independently be exploiting their respective versions of the Man of Steel, they wouldn't have to go through the tricky work of accounting for each others' profits. They'd own what they own. One downside, though, Cheng writes, is that DC would have the more valuable version of the character, given the length of time it has been transforming Man of Steel projects into popular culture.

The other, more obvious, option is that all parties come together. But that's no easy feat. The heirs' attorney, Marc Toberoff, is appealing Larson's decision to the 9th Circuit to get a more definitive ruling on who owns what, while DC is proceeding with its suit against Toberoff, charging that he has poisoned their relationship with the Siegels and Shusters.

Amid all the acrimony, it's easy to forget the original intent of the "rights termination" clause of the Copyright Act: to give authors another opportunity to share in the rewards of their creations, not to parcel them out in bits and pieces.

Larson's point wasn't to parcel out the rights but to compel everyone to come to the same table for potentially mutual benefit. As he wrote in one ruling, Superman is an "aggregate whole," not "a red cape here, a particular villain there."
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Re: Superman

Postby DennisMM on Sun May 29, 2011 4:30 pm

For geeks like me, this is massively cool. I can't afford it, but here is the Superman: The Movie deluxe action figure. The darned thing is stupendous!

30 cm tall (almost 1/6 scale)
lightweight cloth costume
30 points of articulation
interchangeable hands

And the thing is a nearly perfect likeness of Christopher Reeve. I mean, almost exactly.
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Re: Superman

Postby RogueScribner on Sun May 29, 2011 8:56 pm

Oh to have a disposable income for things like that. Me wants!
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Re: Superman

Postby Fievel on Sun May 29, 2011 9:42 pm

Seriously! That is an amazing looking piece!!
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Re: Superman

Postby DennisMM on Mon May 30, 2011 1:10 am

Look at those photos. The musculature is well-molded enough that the costume moves over the curves. It actually appears to have kneecaps. Amazing. I dropped an obscene sum on one of these 12-inch, import Lone Wolf and Cub sets (includes all baby cart weapons and cloth banner) at the turn of the century, and I actually spent $100 on the Rorschach deluxe movie action figure, which you can now find for $30, I think. If the Superman figure was close to $100, I'd consider it an early birthday present. I suspect it will be closer to the Lone Wolf, though (new editions sell for more than $400).
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Tue May 31, 2011 10:49 pm

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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jun 02, 2011 11:07 pm

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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jun 08, 2011 2:40 am

Richard Donner On 30 Years Of Superman, The 'Man Of Steel' Reboot, And Re-Cutting 'Superman II'


From Word Balloon:
A Super Talk With Marty Pasko
John Siuntres wrote:Download The MP3 Here

Marty Pasko joins us as he returns to Metropolis writing the 70’s DC Retroactive issue of Superman, drawn by Eduardo Barretto . We talk about the still amazing world of Superman. We ‘ll discuss the career of the late Jackie Cooper who played Perry White in the first 4 modern Superman films . Despite a good working relationship with Cooper on Simon & Simon in the 80’s Pasko confesses he wasn’t crazy about the casting of Cooper as Perry. Marty also describes the editorial philosophy of Julie Schwartz, and goes into interesting detail about how DC’s Silver and Bronze age books were written .

You’ll get insights into the cast of the 50’s Adventures Of Superman, Superman regulars like Mike Carlin, and Cary Bates We also discuss the way DC and Warner Bros interacted in the 90’s , because Marty had the job as liason between the divisions of Warner Film TV and animation with DC.
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Mon Jun 13, 2011 7:54 pm

BLEEDING COOL VIDEO:
The Return To Krypton Scene From Superman Returns

From CA:
Brandon Routh Returns to Krypton in 'Superman Returns' Deleted Scene [Video]
Return To Krypton - Superman Returns
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Re: Superman

Postby Peven on Mon Jun 13, 2011 8:35 pm

too bad they didn't have the balls to go with that
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Re: Superman

Postby Cpt Kirks 2pay on Mon Jun 13, 2011 8:53 pm

What a shit idea!
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Re: Superman

Postby DennisMM on Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:26 pm

In what way did not including it demonstrate a lack of "balls"? Singer has repeatedly said that the scene made a long movie longer and had no intrinsic story value. I agree. It just looks good. That's not enough reason to further load an already-overloaded movie.
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Re: Superman

Postby Fievel on Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:13 am

Too bad they didn't have the balls to go with this.... and then had the balls to have Braniac follow him back to Earth... with no Lex Luthor to be found anywhere.... and then maybe someone different for Lois Lane.... someone with more..... balls.....
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:24 am

Fievel wrote:Too bad they didn't have the balls to go with this.... and then had the balls to have Braniac follow him back to Earth... with no Lex Luthor to be found anywhere.... and then maybe someone different for Lois Lane.... someone with more..... balls.....

Oh hell no! Lois Lane should never have balls! ;) She should have courage and brains and good looks. BUT NO BALLS!
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Re: Superman

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Jun 14, 2011 10:25 am

that scene looks like something out of 2001. no wonder peven likes it so much. :wink:
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Re: Superman

Postby Peven on Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:33 pm

i just figure if you are going to go to all the trouble of producing that, and it is certainly not as slow or boring as Superman's stalking of Lois, then why not put it in the final cut? have the guts to commit to the vision which was obviously more than a passing whim
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Re: Superman

Postby Fried Gold on Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:52 pm

I like the scene but he was right not to include it at the start of the film.

I'd have cut it into the scene later on between Clark and Martha when he says "That place was a graveyard...."
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Re: Superman

Postby DennisMM on Tue Jun 14, 2011 10:26 pm

Good point, FG.
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KNEEL BEFORE ZOD!

Postby TheButcher on Sat Jun 25, 2011 10:00 pm

From CA:
'Superman II': The Last Great Superman Movie Turns 30
Gary Susman wrote:Forget Nuclear Man and Richard Pryor's computer hacker and Kevin Spacey's Lex Luthor; for the last three decades, Superman's greatest movie threat has been irrelevance. It's been 30 years since the release of Superman II (on June 19, 1981), the last Man of Steel film that pleased both fans and critics, and the last that treated the iconic character with the storytelling verve and dignity he deserves.

'Superman II' was notoriously taken away from its original director and largely re-shot by a director with a more comic sensibility, and yet the revised film worked so well that it remains a fan favorite to this day, one that's had an indelible influence on all the great comic book movies that have followed. Not even the sillier Superman III (1983) and Superman IV: The Quest for Peace, (1987) nor the reverent but airless Superman Returns (2006), can dim the luster of Christopher Reeve's triumphant, poignant turn in the 1981 feature.

There have been countless attempts over the last 30 years to recapture the magic of 'Superman II,' with Warner Bros. spending hundreds of millions on efforts by big-name stars and directors to reboot the franchise, efforts that never came to fruition. Now that a new reboot is in the works (2012's Man of Steel) that will again try to erase the last 30 years of misfires, it's worth looking back at 'Superman II' to see why it worked, why the Superman saga stalled after that, and how the red-caped hero can recapture his former screen glory.

Read More: http://www.comicsalliance.com/2011/06/2 ... z1QLLLVPcb
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Re: Superman, by Sam Peckinpah?

Postby TheButcher on Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:54 pm

From blastr:

9 tantalizing sci-fi movie projects we wish hadn't fallen apart

Marc Bernardin wrote:The Wild Bunch director, who still had a bit of heat thanks to 1972's Steve McQueen hit The Getaway, met with producer Ilya Salkind in late 1974 to discuss his potentially directing a Superman film. (At the time, Salkind was talking with actors like Clint Eastwood, Al Pacino and Muhammad Ali for the role of Clark Kent/Superman.) As the story goes, when Peckinpah pulled a gun during the meeting, his chance at directing Superman was shot.
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Re: Superman

Postby The Vicar on Wed Nov 09, 2011 12:13 am

when Peckinpah pulled a gun during the meeting

Oh that Sam.......what a scamp.
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Re: Superman

Postby TheBaxter on Wed Nov 09, 2011 10:29 am

muhammad ali as superman. now there's a thought.
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Re: Superman

Postby minstrel on Wed Nov 09, 2011 11:07 am

TheBaxter wrote:muhammad ali as superman. now there's a thought.


I once read an anecdote about Ali in a collection of some of the all-time great put-downs. Ali was on an airplane once, and the flight attendant asked him to fasten his seatbelt for takeoff. He said "Superman don't need no seatbelt!" So she answered "Superman don't need no airplane!"

I thought that was pretty funny.
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Re: Superman

Postby DennisMM on Wed Nov 09, 2011 6:50 pm

Of course, Superman once fought Muhammad Ali for the fate of the earth. Supey took a dive, I say.
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Re: Superman

Postby Tyrone_Shoelaces on Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:12 am

The Vicar wrote:when Peckinpah pulled a gun during the meeting

Oh that Sam.......what a scamp.

That was bad habit of Sam's, just ask Julian Lennon.
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Re: McG's Superman

Postby TheButcher on Mon Feb 20, 2012 9:01 pm

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Re: KNEEL BEFORE ZOD!

Postby TheButcher on Mon Mar 26, 2012 10:58 pm

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Re: KNEEL BEFORE ZOD!

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 09, 2012 11:09 pm

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Re: Superman IV

Postby TheButcher on Wed Apr 18, 2012 6:08 am

From io9:
The Profound Philosophical Depth Of The Shittiest Scene In Superman IV
Cyriaque Lamar wrote:This sequence is ultimate distillation of not giving a fuck. I am, of course, referring to the scene in which Mariel Hemingway breathes in space.

For those of you who lack the patience to sit through either The Quest For Peace or the 101-second snippet above, here's what happens. Superman's insane mullet-sporting clone Nuclear Man kidnaps Lacy Warfield, the daughter of a tabloid magnate who has taken over The Daily Planet. He whisks her off into the unforgiving vacuum of space for reasons that only make sense to a mildly brain-damaged Superman doppelgänger. The real Man of Steel pushes the Moon out of orbit, and the ensuing solar eclipse drains his atomic antagonist. Lucy returns to Earth unscathed.

Now, the Christopher Reeve Superman films are not known for their realism. They make every Super Friends episode look like Werner Herzog nature documentaries in comparison. In the course of four movies, Superman travels back in time by reversing the Earth's rotation, erases Lois Lane's memory with a magic kiss, transforms his chest emblem into a cellophane force field, and gets so damn drunk he fights the physical manifestation of his bad mood in a junkyard. Hell, in the above scene he derails the Moon's entire orbit with no ill effects.

As an audience, we have become accustomed to Superman having a great big belly laugh at the laws of reality. But mysteriously, Mariel Hemingway's space respiration is simply too unrealistic. Maybe it's because the movie establishes in its opening minutes that humans can't breathe in space (Superman saves some singing cosmonauts).
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Re: Superman

Postby TheBaxter on Wed Apr 18, 2012 10:01 am

Superman IV: You will believe a man can breathe in space.
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Re: Superman

Postby judderman on Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:56 pm

talk in space too
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Re: Superman III

Postby TheButcher on Wed May 02, 2012 2:39 am

ComicsAlliance Reviews 'Superman III' (1983), Part One
David: This movie is so unapologetic about not giving a f*** about how computers actually work that I can't really hold anything against it.
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Re: Superman IV

Postby TheButcher on Wed May 30, 2012 1:28 am

TheBaxter wrote:Superman IV: You will believe a man can breathe in space.


judderman wrote:talk in space too

ComicsAlliance Reviews 'Superman IV: The Quest For Peace' (1987), Part One
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Fri Jun 15, 2012 5:42 pm

June 15, 2012: A Chat with Ilya Salkind
Steve Younis wrote:Superman Homepage member George Pitcher spoke with Ilya Salkind on the phone this week, chatting about all things Superman related, including "Superboy" the TV series, his thoughts on Richard Donner, Christopher Reeve, the upcoming "Man of Steel" movie and more.

Here are George's notes on the conversation...

George Pitcher wrote:Superboy - Ilya still loves the work they did on that show and when I pressed him about the dvd release for Seasons 2-4 he said that it was disappointing the WB hadn't released them yet as they were the better seasons. He regretted that the series had ended when it did, and felt they had more to say with it yet, but that the WB didn't want to have two Superman shows on TV at the same time so with the impending release of "Lois & Clark" - Superboy had to go. He also said though - that he believed the final seasons would finally see release in coordination with the release of the Man of Steel film! So for all us Superboy fans out there - there may yet be light at the end of the tunnel!

Superman III - Ilya expressed some regret regarding how the finished product came out, though as I pointed out - it was still a success at the box office, just not as big as the studio had wished for. I made mention that it was well known he was a fan of the comics and I asked him about the original draft that was supposed to revolve around Brainiac and Mxyzptlk. He confirmed that the original intent of that film was to pit Superman against both of these classic villains, but that the studio had turned down the idea as they were shying away from such a Sci-fi idea (Brainiac I assumed) in a Superman film. So though they had the intent and the option to include these characters from the DC stable, the WB put a stop to it. He also told me, and this was news to me, that Robert Vaughn wasn't the first choice to play Ross Webster! They had originally cast Frank Langella and director Richard Lester refused to work with him. This was news to me. Ilya thought that without Langella as Webster, the tone of the film changed even more dramatically from what they had originally envisioned, and that the goofier, comedic elements of Superman III became the focus, relying more heavily on Richard Pryor. Ilya confirmed that this wasn't what they had hoped for, feeling that had Langella stayed, the film would have had more Punky Power and a heavier tone overall.

Superman II - Regarding Superman II he also expressed regret, though maintaining that he preferred the theatrical cut as a film overall when compared to the Donner Cut. I gathered from our conversation he felt it was a shame that Donner couldn't finish the film as he would have liked, with a completely new ending rather than turning back time a second time. He seemed to feel there were good moments throughout and though he disliked the notion that Superman and Lois made love with his powers still intact he acknowledged that this act ties the Donner Cut closely with Superman Returns. A film he felt was too similar to Superman: The Movie.

Superman: The Movie - Regarding Superman: The Movie Ilya was quite modest, though he acknowledged a certain amount of pride in knowing that he had been the one who first came up with the idea of bringing Superman to the big screen, and was pleased in the knowledge that Superman: The Movie had made it possible for the superhero movies that followed afterwards. An acknowledgment I agreed was more than fair as I pointed out that he also "found" Richard Donner, so without Ilya's input - Superman: The Movie would have never happened.

Man of Steel - Though optimistic and hopeful, he seemed hesitant and concerned about the new film, especially the costume.

On Christopher Reeve - he had nothing but nice things to say and felt it was unlikely that anyone would ever replace him as Superman.

When the conversation drifted to the script of Superman: The Movie, he spoke with conviction that the sillier elements in the earlier drafts would have never been shot - he had always intended to cut the Telly Savalas gag and such. But he also acknowledged the contributions of Tom Mankiewicz and Donner to the final script.

On Richard Donner - He said he doubted Donner would ever want to work with him again while maintaining that firing Donner had been a necessity. While it was an old wound and that time had healed over such things for him, he felt that Richard might still be stinging from how it ended. He did say though that he called Donner when Mank died to express his condolences and that it was sad we lost Tom so soon, as he had so much more to offer. But Ilya didn't seem to be opposed to the idea of working with Donner again, only that he didn't think Donner would be responsive to the idea.

Most exciting of all - was our discussion of his current projects. Though I'm not sure I have the right to say much about them, it was clear he was very excited about his upcoming film about The Great Wall of China - and with good reason too! From our discussion, it seems his intent is to create a film that harkens back to Hollywood's days gone by, an old school epic in the vein of El Cid and Ben-hur - two films he referenced directly as sources of inspiration. Actual location shoots with massive numbers of extras rather than extensive CGI. I applauded this notion - as no one is doing this kind of film anymore.

Though I was caught off-guard for an interview and ill-prepared, I was simply delighted to have the opportunity to talk at length about his involvement in movies that have touched all our lives. Honestly we could have continued to talk for another hour at the very least, if I hadn't been called back down to earth by my youngest who had patiently waited for her Daddy to get off the phone. :) But as the conversation came to a close he told me to keep in touch and I certainly hope we will. Over all I was really pleased to hear for myself how much love Ilya Salkind really has - not only for the character of Superman but for the fan base as well. I came away from our conversation with the opinion that he was a very warm, thoughtful person who still has a great passion for not only Superman and the fans but for filmmaking as a whole. A great gentleman, and it was a true pleasure to be able to talk to him about his involvement in the Superman franchise.


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Re: Superman Returns

Postby TheButcher on Tue Jul 03, 2012 1:15 am

ComicsAlliance Reviews 'Superman Returns' (2006), Part One
Chris Sims and David Uzumeri wrote:Chris Sims: We can't put it off any longer, everyone. Today, David and I start in on the final movie in our in-depth examination of the Superman film franchise, 2006's Superman Returns. I'm just going to go ahead and get this out there now: This may in fact be the worst super-hero movie ever made, if only because it actually had the potential to be great.

David Uzumeri: In terms of prerelease information and Singer's track record? Because honestly, as soon as we got to "it picks up off of an unreleased cut of the second movie," I was pretty damn skeptical that this was going to be any good.

Chris:
That's a fair point, and one that really gets to the heart of the problem: Rewatching it for this article, I was struck by how much genuinely interesting and good stuff there actually is in here, and how much it's completely swallowed up by the fact that as a whole, the movie is wrongheaded and extremely masturbatory. It spends so much time paying homage to Richard Donner's vision (which, to be fair, neither of us liked anyway) that the character of Superman is barely recognizable, and almost completely non-heroic.

David
: The biggest problem with Superman Returns -- and the reason everybody was excited about it -- is that its director is a complete and total fanboy.

Chris: You're right, but during the pre-release hype, that didn't really seem like a bad thing. Bryan Singer had just come off the first two X-Men movies, which had been regarded as two of the all-time best movies based on comics. Between that and the fact that he seemed like a dude who genuinely loved Superman, Warner Bros. luring him away from the X-Men franchise to helm a Superman reboot seemed like a great idea - especially following up on the success they'd had with Batman Begins.

David: It's funny. If he hadn't been taken from the X-franchise, we might have had one good X-Men 3. Instead, we got two really bad movies in the forms of Superman Returns and X-Men: The Last Stand.

Chris: And we got them one right after the other, too: X-Men 3 was released a month before Superman Returns. And the amazing thing is, they're both terrible in their own unique ways.

David:
The thing is, Singer wanted to create a love letter to Richard Donner's version, and in that respect he absolutely, unquestionably succeeded. The problem with this movie, however, is that it's a love letter to Richard Donner's version.

Chris: Exactly. It's an homage almost to the point of parody. The same plot points and even lines are recycled, and Singer ends up wasting a cast that's actually pretty phenomenal by having Brandon Routh and Kevin Spacey play Christopher Reeve and Gene Hackman instead of Superman and Lex Luthor.

David: Yeah, it is a perfect success at replicating all of the first films' flaws, which is amazing! That said, the first two movies had an excellent Lois Lane in the form of Margot Kidder, and these movies have ... Kate Bosworth.

Chris: I think Bosworth gets a bad rap - she's really not bad, she just happens to be playing the worst possible version of Lois Lane. And that's really what kills this movie: It's the worst of all possible worlds. Lois alternates between bland and shrewish, Superman is a creep who's actively trying to steal another man's girlfriend, Luthor's trying to pull off some weird land scheme because that' what he did in Donner's movie, and it's all treated with this reverence that it doesn't earn.

David: It even uses the same damn score. The ROI on the money they gave John Williams back in 1978 must be insane. They used it for four damn movies. Five, if you count the small bit of the theme playing in Supergirl.

Chris: I think what we're getting at here is that this is not a very good film, and that it's bad in a very frustrating way. You can see how good it might've been as it all plays out, but instead you get a movie so awful that when I started watching it on my phone this week, Siri wouldn't talk to me for an hour.

David: And the worst part is, there are individual parts that are great. But here we are. You ready to jump in?

Chris: Let's do it.
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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Mon Aug 06, 2012 1:09 am

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Re: Superman

Postby SilentBobX on Mon Aug 06, 2012 5:22 am

I cannot deny that he's the best movie Superman, but for me, George Reeves was the best Superman PERIOD. His Clark Kent wasn't some bumbler but an everyman who fit in very well with society. And while the wires may have been visible during his flying, he was dedicated. Shame about both men being typecast the way they were.


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Re: Superman

Postby TheButcher on Tue Aug 14, 2012 7:49 pm

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Moriarty vs JJ aka Superman: Flyby

Postby TheButcher on Thu Jan 31, 2013 6:43 am

From The Superman Homepage:
January 31, 2013: Never-Made "Flyby" Movie Script by JJ Abrams
Steve Younis wrote:On the back of the Wesley Strick script we posted yesterday, the Superman Homepage has now received a copy of the "Flyby" script written by JJ Abrams for the aborted Superman project.

This is not the 2002 first draft from July 26, 2002 that we've had available on this website for a few years now. This is a draft specifically titled "Flyby" which is dated October 24, 2003, but which is obviously an updated version of the same story from that earlier 2002 draft featuring the Kryptonian villain named Ty-Zor.

From AICN Sep 23, 2002:
AICN EXCLUSIVE! Moriarty's Review Of JJ ABRAMS SUPERMAN Script!! - YOU’LL BELIEVE A FRANCHISE CAN SUCK!!


Why JJ Abrams is the right choice for 'Star Wars: Episode VII'
It looks like he's got the job, and that's a good thing
Moriarty wrote: If I were Abrams, just based on the seven hours or so since this news first broke, I would have all Internet capability disabled on my end for the entire time he's in production. The immediate response to almost any announcement like this is cynical, and in this case, people seem to have made their minds up about Abrams already, good and bad. Certainly my attitudes about his work have changed over the years, but I'd argue so has his work. I would hope that whoever landed this job, the main response from fandom would be a sincere "Good luck," because I don't want to sit in a theater disappointed in 2015. I want this next chapter of "Star Wars" to be something that I share with my "Star Wars" loving kids, something that we all get to be excited about, a worthwhile new piece of this giant tapestry of space opera.
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