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Chappie

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 11:15 pm
by Ribbons
Yea or Nay?





Image

Re: Random Movie News

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:33 am
by Peven
yea

Re: Random Movie News

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 11:18 am
by TheBaxter
i say yea.... but only if this is a movie about an obsolete robot cop (as opposed to a RoboCop) who is decommissioned and about to be destroyed, but he escapes and lives on the streets, selling his body to get by, until he comes across a family made up of a frazzled single mom with three kids, including an infant still being potty-trained, a precocious 7-year-old boy who wisecracks constantly through the film, and a rebellious teenage daughter, and Chappie is adopted by the family to be their housekeeper/babysitter, where he proceeds to teach them all valuable life lessons, all while engaging in hilarious robot antics involving changing diapers with laser-fast robotic reflexes (and an ill-fated attempt at breastfeeding that leads to the baby going to the ER to have oil pumped from its stomach), solving the son's problem with bullies at school with a few precisely-aimed headshots, and showing up at the daughter's high school talent contest as a gangsta rapper when her mom is too busy to come, but the mom shows up anyway and everybody breaks down crying and saying i love you while Chappie looks on beaming with pride.

if that's what this is, then all the YEA. all of it.

Re: Random Movie News

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 12:29 pm
by Al Shut
Slightly leaning yea but mostly huh?

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 3:49 pm
by so sorry


I dunno, doesn't do it for me. Nothing we haven't seen before (AI, Short Circuit, probably a few mangas too), just a little more "gritty". The Science Guy looks about as stereotypical as it gets too.

Meh, not my cup of tea I guess.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 4:19 pm
by Lord Voldemoo
change the music to the creepy version of "I've got no strings" from the Age of Ultron trailer and this immediately becomes a futuristic horror film.

I'm not blown away, this seems like it's been done before. But I'll watch it out of goodwill built from District 9.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 4:35 pm
by TheBaxter
hmmm. Hugh Jackman. and a robot.

Real Steel Part 2?

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 12:32 pm
by Peven
a robotic Harry and the Hendersons, which is alright by me. Neil does tech stuff well visually and in District 9 he told the story of an outsider struggling against small-minded morally and ethically corrupt humans quite well, too. so this material should be in his comfort zone. of course we've seen this story before, just like you have seen every other movie's story before. there are less types to stories to tell than fingers on your hands, just ask the Greeks, the ones who invented theatre. It is about how well one tells the story, cinematically here, that matters.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 2:31 pm
by Ribbons
...is that Die Antwoord in the trailer?

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 6:15 am
by Al Shut
I believe the answer is yes

Chappie

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 11:07 pm
by Peven
i think people are underestimating the depth and heart of this movie. Blomkamp knows how to shoot action and he puts a lot of heart into his movies even though they are sci-tech heavy. I don't care for the release date they have given this, hamstrings its potential to an extent, i think. this movie could really strike a chord for people and be a sleeper hit, relatively speaking for a "little" movie, from what I am seeing. the latest trailer looks excellent, imo


Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2015 11:43 pm
by Ribbons
I don't know if I'm underestimating the movie or not. I'm not that excited, but I want to be surprised. District 9 is one of my favorite sci-fi movies in recent years. I like Blomkamp's blend of high concept and a world that feels real, and I appreciate using the genre as a platform for social issues, but Elysium was a huge letdown for me. I'm hoping going back to South Africa and a slightly smaller scope will make Chappie a return to form.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 2:01 am
by Peven
Ribbons wrote:I don't know if I'm underestimating the movie or not. I'm not that excited, but I want to be surprised. District 9 is one of my favorite sci-fi movies in recent years. I like Blomkamp's blend of high concept and a world that feels real, and I appreciate using the genre as a platform for social issues, but Elysium was a huge letdown for me. I'm hoping going back to South Africa and a slightly smaller scope will make Chappie a return to form.


Elysium was a huge letdown for you?? huge? why? it was definitely flawed in that not all plot points tied together the most sensibly, but even though I was somewhat disappointed in it after District 9 I still enjoyed it.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 1:39 pm
by Ribbons
When I say it was a huge letdown I don't mean that the movie was awful, but in terms of level of disappointment, yes, it was up there. The scale was bigger than District 9, at least, but I'm not sure that's a good thing. As far as social issues go, the gap between the rich and poor is about as big and complex as it gets, one that can't be wrapped up as easily as hacking into a computer and pressing a "free Elysium for everyone" button. It didn't sit well with me, in any case. Compare it to the end of District 9, where you don't know whether the aliens stuck in South Africa are better off, if Christopher comes back to save Wikus, or if Christopher even made it home before bleeding to death. I also love the character of Wikus, whereas Matt Damon barely left an impression (that crucifix on his back was the exact opposite of ambiguous as well). In this instance it definitely looks like Chappie will be better than Elysium. And although I wouldn't want Blomkamp to repeat the faux-documentary format of District 9 every time he makes a movie, the unconventional narrative definitely gives it a leg up in my book. Those are the kinds of choices that made District 9 fresh and surprising for me, as opposed to Elysium, which I found okay but unmemorable.

What I'm hoping is that the smaller scale of Chappie will equal more creative freedom. A childlike robot and the two weirdest members of Die Antwoord certainly helps. I can tell there's political commentary here -- soldiers are essentially programmed drones and it's dangerous when they start to think for themselves -- which is fine, but hopefully Blomkamp doesn't try to solve the fog of war in his 90-minute robot movie and let the story evolve naturally. The fact that the subtext is there is enough to get people thinking. Again I'm hoping that doing a huge Matt Damon movie where expectations were higher and execs and producers probably got involved just watered down his style, and that Chappie will at least be better than Elysium, if not District 9. But we'll see.

Totally unrelated and I know it's out of context, but that shot of Hugh Jackman sneaking around with a pair of binoculars (and his sweet, sweet mullet) cracks me up.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 7:43 am
by Peven
i think I agree with you in that having a big name and name like Damon and a big scale the budget for Elysium threw Neil off his game somewhat and a return to a more intimate store and scale will produce something more on the level of quality we saw in District 9

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2015 1:51 pm
by Spandau Belly
Ribbons wrote:As far as social issues go, the gap between the rich and poor is about as big and complex as it gets, one that can't be wrapped up as easily as hacking into a computer and pressing a "free Elysium for everyone" button. It didn't sit well with me, in any case.


I skipped ELYSIUM for exactly this reason. I hate movies, especially sci-fi action movies, that try to lead with their message. Usually because their message (and especially in this case) is really simplistic and not the revelation that the filmmakers seem to think it is. I'd rather you sell me with your plot, characters, spectacle, and ideas. Putting a broader social issue in the subtext is fine, but if a movie isn't working on its surface level, I usually won't give a shit about its message.

Guys like Romero, Carpenter, Verhoeven, Miller could all do this stuff really well. Their movies were compelling because there was a conflict you could relate to, but they kept the focus on the story; and the characters had enough detail and colourful natural interactions that they didn't just feel like stand-ins for a larger social group.


As for CHAPPIE, like most of the world, I probably won't see it. It's slated to open the same weekend as BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL 2, so Blomkamp is going to lose that covetted 65+ demographic. The trailer is a bit of a mixed bag. At times it looks really fun and schlocky. I mean, Weaver's performance is like something right out of one of those jokey grindhouse trailers. I'd swear she was auditioning for HOBO WITH A SHOTGUN 2. But most of the trailer just made think I'd be better off to just watch the real ROBOCOP movie.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:19 pm
by Peven
this is a genre that is revitalizing true science fiction, imo, many times by mining ideas of the golden age of science fiction back in the 50's and 60's, when it was more about ideas than shock or style. the ideas those writers worked with then are now closer to being tested by reality with the development of A.I. and robotics, an area that is poised to potentially change the fundamental workings of economies and societies over the course of the next 100 years. the questions and issues this developing technology bring with it are complex and demand that we revisit our basic definitions of consciousness, our identity as a species, as individuals, of life itself. there is enough material to mine for thoughtful filmmakers for many more robot/A.I movies that can be timely, imaginative, and engaging.




Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:39 pm
by Ribbons
Yeah, it definitely seems like this year is going to be very heavy on artificial intelligence movies, which is interesting. The Imitation Game actually fits nicely into this category as well.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:43 pm
by Peven
the issues this genre taps into are those asked by fundamental philosophy. what is consciousness? what is life? what is the source of right and wrong? what, if any, is the purpose of our existence? lots of material....

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 4:12 pm
by Ribbons
Some of it is curiosity about this developing technology and about our own consciousness. Some of it I think is fear of the apocalypse, which also fuels all the zombie shows and movies that people love to digest these days, and also a paranoia about these machines that we're increasingly giving our lives over to, and paranoia about the people who might misuse them (the NSA, Google, that dude who leaked the celebrity nudie photos).

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 6:52 pm
by Peven
fear of the apocalypse is no new phenomenon but zombies as we know of them in pop culture are very new and I think a better case can be made that their popularity stems from a feeling of a lack of purpose in life in our consumer-based, disposable culture. people are definitely wary of technology, and cautionary tales about the perils of hubris in using it go back thousands of years.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:27 pm
by Peven

Re: Chappie 1986

PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2015 5:23 am
by TheButcher
so sorry wrote:I dunno, doesn't do it for me. Nothing we haven't seen before (AI, Short Circuit, probably a few mangas too), just a little more "gritty". The Science Guy looks about as stereotypical as it gets too.

Meh, not my cup of tea I guess.

Short Circuit Trailer

WALL•E



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Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:53 am
by so sorry
Anybody see this? Sounds like its getting pretty poor reviews...

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 7:47 pm
by Ribbons
It does seem to be getting mostly bad reviews, but I've read a few from people who enjoyed it quite a bit.

The consensus is that the plot is kind of a mess, like 3-4 movies slapped together, but for some that madcap approach works. I'm probably not going to rush out and see it though.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 12:05 am
by RaulMonkey
I'll definitely wait for cable or streaming on this one. Sorry Neill.

On an AI note, I have to give a shout to the documentary on Ray Kurzweil, "Transcendent Man." There are probably lots of people here familiar with Kurzweil, but it was an intro for me, and I haven't been intellectually and spiritually disturbed by ideas like this in a while. It's on Netflix now (at least in Canada.)

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 3:24 pm
by Ribbons
Yeah, well it's not on Netflix in America!

You have piqued my curiosity though. I think I'm going to have them mail it to me so I can check it out.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 11:48 pm
by RaulMonkey
As a film I give it a 7/10, but the ideas are fascinating and disturbing. I can now see the influence of them on certain science fiction like Caprica (or no doubt Wally Pfister's "Transcendence.") There are lots of opposing and supplementary ideas provided by other thinkers, and it's going to take me a while to get my head around and feel comfortable with them. I think the last time I felt this way was reading Nietzsche for the first time.

The movie references Kurzweil's book, "The Singularity is Near," so there's another delivery method for what he's all about.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2015 12:35 am
by Ribbons
That explains the subtitle, Have You Even Read My Book?

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2015 7:24 am
by Spandau Belly
I read his book 'The Age of Spiritual Machines' back when I was a teenager. It was mostly predictions about the evolution of robot species. He took various historic achievements in programming and robotics and used that timeline to predict a future one and how humans will react. He made a very compelling case. I found most of his theories to be completely plausible. I had trouble disagreeing with any of it. It was a good read, he's a cool guy.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2015 5:46 am
by minstrel
I just saw this tonight because it just showed up from Amazon.

I can't say I enjoyed it much. The set up is okay, even though it's Robocop all over again. But then there's a HUGE LONG BORING middle act that had me checking my watch every five minutes and had our house guest snoring on the couch. Boy, did that section ever need editing! They could easily have chopped twenty minutes out of the middle act and lost nothing. Finally, the third act begins and we get some serious action, but it isn't very satisfying. The villain doesn't even properly get his comeuppance and James Cameron did the consciousness-transference thing more believably and better in Avatar.

What worked? Some of the performances were good, or at least surprising. The members of Die Antwoord were effective, though their arcs seemed a bit tangled. Sharlto Copley's voice performance was excellent. Dev Patel sold his role as the AI genius effectively. But other roles were woefully underwritten. Sigourney Weaver does almost nothing. Hugh Jackman is as flat as a pancake. The Big Bad Villains (the ones Die Antwoord owe money to) are even more cardboard-cutout than the villains in The Road Warrior. So, mostly, blah.

This movie draws from Short Circuit, Robocop, AI, and even Avatar, and has very few, if any, original ideas. A very disappointing movie, all told.

Re: Chappie

PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2016 2:29 pm
by Ribbons
No love for Chappie?

I liked it a lot more than I expected to. It definitely doesn't "lead with the message," as we discussed up-thread. In fact there are times where it tackles several big ideas at once. A lot of these ideas have been done before, and better, in other films, but I enjoyed the characters enough that it didn't bother me. Chappie is a fully realized creation, childlike and dangerous, with a heart of gold but a gutter mouth. Sharlto Copley does a great job with the voice and motion capture work. And casting Die Antwoord as warped gangster versions of themselves was a stroke of genius. It's not a great movie by any means -- and the twist it takes at the very end involving transferring consciousness brings up a lot of practical and philosophical questions that are completely ignored -- but it's not a bad couple hours' worth of entertainment.