Page 3 of 3

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:55 pm
by Ribbons
Thit shit is TONIGHT, Zoners! Show up on this forum or on Facebook (or invite us to chats with your normal movie fans, *wink wink*). Spread the word!

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:29 pm
by caruso_stalker217
I wish I didn't have to work tonight because I don't give a single shot about the Oscars this year but would love to kill a few hours bitching about it!

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 3:09 pm
by Fried Gold
Ribbons wrote:Thit shit is TONIGHT, Zoners! Show up on this forum or on Facebook (or invite us to chats with your normal movie fans, *wink wink*). Spread the word!


Also, this is still here

http://zonersunite3000.blogspot.co.uk/

and has been left in pristine condition since last year.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 5:00 pm
by Ribbons
caruso_stalker217 wrote:I wish I didn't have to work tonight because I don't give a single shot about the Oscars this year but would love to kill a few hours bitching about it!


I'm working tonight as well but should be done around 9

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 5:10 pm
by Maui
Yeah, I probably will chime in at some point.
I've seen all the films.
Do we want to start early and make fun of people on the red carpet?

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 9:27 pm
by King Of Nowhere
About 3 mins to lift off...

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:00 pm
by Fievel
KONNNN!

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:09 pm
by Ribbons
Holy shit you guys.


Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:48 am
by Cpt Kirks 2pay
You guys were right, there were Obit snubs...
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/o ... k_20170226

In there apparently it says that there are TWO envelopes given out per winner...

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/o ... k_20170226

Anyway that was fun and epic and so so memorable ok let's go watch last night's The Walking Dead.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:48 am
by TheBaxter
so La La Land won the popular vote, but Moonlight won the electoral vote. easy mistake to make.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 5:32 am
by Al Shut
For once I decide to skip this in it's entirety and this is what happens? :shock:

Next year I shall stay up again.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 9:14 am
by so sorry
Damn, I turned it off right after the LA LA Land announcement...missed all the fun!

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 11:07 am
by TheBaxter
i feel bad for the losing nominees in Best Foreign Language and Best Documentary Short categories, who will go the rest of their lives wondering if Donald Trump's election cost them an Oscar.

last year it was #OscarsSoWhite... after this year's shocking twist ending it's more like #OscarsSoWHAATT!?!?!?

Re: M. Night Shyamalan's 'Academy Awards 2017'

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 12:19 pm
by TheButcher
TheBaxter wrote:i feel bad for the losing nominees in Best Foreign Language and Best Documentary Short categories, who will go the rest of their lives wondering if Donald Trump's election cost them an Oscar.

last year it was #OscarsSoWhite... after this year's shocking twist ending it's more like #OscarsSoWHAATT!?!?!?


Twitter:
M. Night Shyamalan wrote:I wrote the ending of the academy awards 2017. @jimmykimmel we really got them!

Image

Trump Says Opponents Played the "Race Car" at the Oscars

Re: OSKAHS 2017

PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2017 10:46 am
by TheButcher
Viola Davis Becomes First Black Actor to Win an Oscar, Emmy & Tony
Viola Davis won the best supporting actress Oscar Sunday night for her performance in “Suicide Squad!”

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Thu Mar 02, 2017 5:28 am
by TheButcher

Re: Japanese Academy Awards 2017

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 1:40 pm
by TheButcher
'Shin Godzilla' Wins Big at 40th Japanese Academy Awards
Gavin J. Blair wrote:Godzilla Resurgence (Shin Godzilla) was the big winner, with seven victories, at the 40th Japan Academy Prize awards on Friday, beating out Makoto Shinkai's anime Your Name, which took three awards.

Godzilla Resurgence won best picture, while Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi jointly took the best director award for their work together on the Toho reboot of the iconic monster franchise.


In This Corner of the World, 'your name.' Win Japan Academy Prizes
Hideaki Anno, Shinji Higuchi's Shin Godzilla film also wins 7 awards
Anno and Higuchi's live-action Shin Godzilla film won Picture of the Year, and the Anno and Higuchi won Director of the Year.

Shin Godzilla also won Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography (Kōsuke Yamada),
Outstanding Achievement in Lighting Direction (Takayuki Kawabe),
Outstanding Achievement in Art Direction (Yuji Hayashida, Eri Sakushima),
Outstanding Achievement in Sound Recording (Jun Nakamura, Haru Yamada),
and Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing (Hideaki Anno, Atsuki Sato).

Additionally, the film was nominated for Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role (Hiroki Hasegawa) and Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role (Satomi Ishihara and Mikako Ichikawa).

Re: #OscarsSoWrong

PostPosted: Sun Mar 05, 2017 12:08 am
by TheButcher
Fried Gold wrote:Image

How The Academy Failed The Transparency Test
The Oscar disaster should be a signal for deep and far-reaching change.
Stephen Galloway wrote:Way back in the days when the Oscars mattered less, when a clubby group of insiders gathered annually at such venues as the Cocoanut Grove and the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to present each other with their treasured trophies, the grandees of the motion picture business realized they had a problem.

There was a gap between quality and reward, between a film or performance’s artistic merits and the prizes it received. Clearly there was a connection between the chums who did the giving, and the chums who did the receiving.

Where there was smoke, there was fire, and in 1934 the seven-year-old Academy moved to douse the flames, hiring Price Waterhouse (as it was then known) to tabulate the results.

Since then, nobody has questioned the authenticity of the process; nor did anyone do so at the first Academy Awards where the accountants did their job, in 1935, when It Happened One Night was named best picture, with its stars, Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, winning the two sole acting awards.

Eight decades have passed since then, and during that time the whole world has changed. We’ve gone through a world war, a civil rights battle, a media upheaval and a computer revolution. And yet, throughout, the Oscars and their selection process have barely changed.

True, each year there are tweaks to the system, subtle calibrations to allow more gas per mile, rather than replace the combustion engine. The Academy understandably has been cautious about reinventing the machine or abandoning a tradition that lends its such Punky Power. But this year’s Oscar fiasco throw this to the winds: A system that places its nuclear button under the fingers of two flawed and fallible accountants alone is too perilous to continue.

It’s time for radical change.

I don’t mean the Academy should necessarily throw PwC overboard (though the captain who crashed this ship, Brian Cullinan, ought to have had the decency to resign); I mean the Academy should reconsider its entire approach to the awards, along with much of its secretive way of doing business.

Let’s be clear about one thing: The Oscars are not handed out by a small coterie of pals who meet in private to discuss contenders’ strengths and weaknesses; they’re determined by a vast group — and one that’s getting vaster by the year — of 7,000 men and women divided by oceans and mountains, by geographical as well as cultural difference. They’re linked by little more than their cinematic achievements. They encompass representatives not only of the American film industry but of industries around the world, whose decisions impact not merely individual careers but even relations between nation states.

In the age of the Internet, a win for Iran’s Asghar Farhadi (whose The Salesman was named best foreign-language film) —and even more importantly, his decision not to attend the awards because of Trump’s travel ban — has political as well as artistic ramifications. And yet the Academy and its leadership seem oblivious to this brave new world, to the giant implications of an Oscar victory, to the need for the utmost clarity and transparency in choosing whose victory that is, given its potential effect.

The Academy’s members are not part of a private club; they’re part of a global electorate, their elections scrutinized on an international stage. And because of that, those elections should be ruled by the principles we apply to all such plebiscites.

Free and fair elections should adhere to the following core values: (1) Voting should be open and transparent; (2) The voting system should be clear and simple enough for everyone to understand; and (3) Each vote should have the same weight as any other.

Right now, none of these principles apply.

#OscarsSoWrong: Two Accountants Involved in Best Picture Mistake Won't Work on Show Again, Academy President Says
PwC accountants Brian Cullinan and Martha Ruiz were responsible for the winners' envelopes at Sunday's Oscar show.

Casey Affleck Opens Up About Sexual Harassment Allegations: "Everyone Deserves to Be Treated With Respect"
The 'Manchester by the Sea' star, who won the best actor Oscar, had remained silent throughout awards season about a lawsuit he settled following claims from two women who worked with him on the 2010 film 'I'm Still Here.'

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 6:10 am
by bastard_robo
Meanwhile, Shin Godzilla was nowhere on the list of the massively depressing foreign film line up.

I have a fondness for the Oscars, but they've been following a repeating pattern for the better part of the decade of shoving either politics or their self masturbatory love of themselves down our throats. Tell me what was the last Best Picture winner that anyone still goes back and watches today and quotes in the last 8 or 9 years

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:59 pm
by Cpt Kirks 2pay
bastard_robo wrote:Meanwhile, Shin Godzilla was nowhere on the list of the massively depressing foreign film line up.

I have a fondness for the Oscars, but they've been following a repeating pattern for the better part of the decade of shoving either politics or their self masturbatory love of themselves down our throats. Tell me what was the last Best Picture winner that anyone still goes back and watches today and quotes in the last 8 or 9 years


What, like Deadpool?

You're one of those guys that geek out over geek immature films and think they should be winning Oscars. I bet you wanted Andy Serkis to be nominated too and threatened to boycott the Oscars if he got 'snubbed'. Sigh.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 9:00 pm
by Fievel
#mocaplivesmatter

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Wed Mar 08, 2017 7:02 pm
by caruso_stalker217
bastard_robo wrote:Meanwhile, Shin Godzilla was nowhere on the list of the massively depressing foreign film line up.

I have a fondness for the Oscars, but they've been following a repeating pattern for the better part of the decade of shoving either politics or their self masturbatory love of themselves down our throats. Tell me what was the last Best Picture winner that anyone still goes back and watches today and quotes in the last 8 or 9 years


A had to go back a decade to find NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 11:56 am
by Al Shut
I may not qoute The Artist, for obvious reasons, but I'm sure going to revisit from time to time.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 12:56 pm
by caruso_stalker217
THE ARTIST is pretty good. It's basically fluff, but good fluff.

If DJANGO UNCHAINED had won a few years back, it would probably be my most revisited Best Picture of the last decade. Instead we got.......

......was it ARGO?

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:04 pm
by Peven
Argo was a good flick, a solid movie.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:44 pm
by Fievel
Peven wrote:Argo was a good flick, a solid movie.


Indeed.

And for a quote?
"Argo fuck yourself!"

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 6:13 pm
by Ribbons
I think the last Best Picture winner that was indisputably the film of the year and a classic that will still be talked about decades from now was probably No Country for Old Men. I honestly can't even remember what won last year.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 9:47 pm
by caruso_stalker217
SPOTLIGHT was a surprise win last year. MOONLIGHT was a surprise this year. Next year will also be something-LIGHT. That's my prediction.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 12:23 am
by TheBaxter
caruso_stalker217 wrote:SPOTLIGHT was a surprise win last year. MOONLIGHT was a surprise this year. Next year will also be something-LIGHT. That's my prediction.


NIGHTLIGHT?
DOMELIGHT?
LITE BRITE: THE MOVIE?

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2017 6:23 am
by Cpt Kirks 2pay
With movies like Birdman, 12 Years A Slave, Moonlight, Spotlight, Argo winning, this really is being a decade of real small insignificant and forgettable movies that really don't have an impact on movie making. It's a more 'nothing' decade than the 80s were for Oscars. Just real small fluff winners that no one will hardly remember at all.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2017 9:11 am
by Peven
i think they are better movies than the 80's, though I agree they haven't been very impactful on filmmaking, but considering that box office success affects filmmaking more than artistic success these days I'd argue that you are proposing voters reward commercial success first and foremost, meaning you just lobbied for Transformers to be a Best Picture nominee. :-P

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2017 9:28 am
by TheBaxter
i blame it all on Crash. once that horrible turd of a movie won Best Picture, it opened the floodgates for all kinds of forgettable crap to win.

although as bad as Crash's win was, it won't be forgotten. it will be remembered for a long time.... as the worst movie to ever win an Oscar.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:31 pm
by caruso_stalker217
TheBaxter wrote:i blame it all on Crash. once that horrible turd of a movie won Best Picture, it opened the floodgates for all kinds of forgettable crap to win.

although as bad as Crash's win was, it won't be forgotten. it will be remembered for a long time.... as the worst movie to ever win an Oscar.


CRASH is one of the worst films I have ever seen. No hyperbole.

Re: The Academy's Tribute To Richard Donner

PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2017 4:13 am
by TheButcher
AN ACADEMY TRIBUTE TO RICHARD DONNER
Able to leap movie genres with a single bound, producer-director Richard Donner was given a special tribute at the Academy on June 7, 2017 with a gathering of many of his friends and colleagues turning up for a warm, unforgettable evening in the Samuel Goldwyn Theater. From action to horror, fantasy to superhero films, Donner has carved his own path in Hollywood since he burst out of the television scene for a career spanning over five decades.

Following a welcome to the packed house by Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the first Donner tribute came from two major names in the worlds of film and comic books who got their start as his employees: Kevin Feige of Marvel Studios, and Geoff Johns of DC Entertainment, who hailed Donner’s Superman (1978) as the gold standard of superhero films and the product of Donner’s efforts to save the American superhero icon from a terrible potential script for the film that had been sent to him. Feighe noted the importance of the word “verisimilitude” that Donner used as a mantra for that film and many more, to honor the source material and “take it seriously.” They also both recalled a memorable, disastrous moment when they were both on the Warner Bros. lot as Feige attempted to take Donner’s Suburban out to be gassed up, only for things to take a catastrophic turn that still leaves a mark at the Hollywood studio.

Longtime Donner editor Stuart Baird appeared via a prerecorded testimonial recorded in England to introduce a clip from Donner’s major breakthrough film, the trendsetting horror film The Omen (1976), noting the use of a tricycle he cheekily pointed out as an inspiration for The Shining (1980). Following the release of Superman and the director’s rocky relationship with its sequel, Superman II (1980), Donner moved on to the acclaimed slice-of-life drama Inside Moves (1980), which was represented by two of its stars, John Savage (who spoke of Donner’s ability to “take a good script and turn it into gold”) and David Morse, who made his debut with the film thanks to a quick-witted fib about his basketball abilities.

Donner’s wife, producer Lauren Shuler Donner, was full of stories about falling in love with this “defender of the underdog” during the years-long process of making Ladyhawke (1985), which was originally supposed to be shot in Eastern Europe but wound up in Italy instead. She was 33 when the film went before the cameras and in the process of getting a divorce, which provided the chance for a courtship that led to a movie world love story that continues to this day. Though they’ve only worked together directly three times, they co-own their own production company and, as she says, she finds that “Dick Donner directing is the sexiest man alive.”

Another 1985 film for Donner was the Steven Spielberg-produced The Goonies, one of the biggest cult films of that decade, and three of the title characters were on hand in the theater: Jeff B. Cohen (who played Chunk and is now an entertainment lawyer after Donner surprised him by paying for his college education), Ke Huy Quan (who played Data, became a stunt and action choreographer, and noted of his child actor energy, “I’m sure I’m personally responsible for some of those gray hairs” on Donnor’s head), and Corey Feldman (who played Mouth and recalled warming up to Donnor when the project transitioned from Spielberg as director). As present via a phone-recorded message was castmate Martha Plimpton. More humor was provided by the colorful Carol Kane, who drew an affectionate analogy between Donnor and a little league coach before introducing a clip of her indelible turn as Bill Murray’s hard-hitting Ghost of Christmas Present in Scrooged (1988).

Another child actor given a big boost by Donner, Joseph Mazzello, credited Donnor as “the reason I love making movies” after being cast in his second feature role in Radio Flyer (1992), which also found ways to work in roles for several of Mazzllo’s family members – a recurring Donner touch. Prerecorded cheerful messages were provide by Jodie Foster, who starred in Maverick (1994), and Warner Bros. executive and current AFI chairman Robert A. Daly, while Oscar-winning screenwriter Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential) got one of the biggest laughs of the night when he told the story of how he and his young son first met Donner on the Warner Bros. lot – an encounter that would soon lead to Helgeland writing the screenplays for two Donner films, Assassins (1995) and Conspiracy Theory (1997).

The one movie series guided by Donner in all of its installments is also one of the most beloved action franchises in movie history, launched with Lethal Weapon (1987) and continuing with Lethal Weapon 2 (1989), Lethal Weapon 3 (1992) and Lethal Weapon 4 (1998). Riggs and Murtaugh themselves, Mel Gibson and Danny Glover, proved their explosive chemistry hadn’t faded one bit over the years as they appeared on stage to settle the 30-year-old issue of a shirt they both wanted and launched into a rapid-fire string of banter that had the audience in stitches. After clips from the second and third films in the series, both stars were joined by Rene Russo and Donner himself for a reunion that had the visibly touched filmmaker himself tossing away his prepared speech and confessing, “I’m the luckiest person in the world. This industry is my friend.” He explained how much it meant to see so many friends he’d made over the years, thanks to a directing career that began with a suggestion from the great Martin Ritt when Donner was starting out as a young bit actor: “You can’t take direction. You ought to be a director.” That’s advice millions of moviegoers are still glad Donner took to heart.



Twitter:
#DCEU(Geoff Johns) and #Marvel(Kevin Feige) together. We can get along! #RichardDonner Tribute!

Re: THE OSKAHS 2018

PostPosted: Fri Jul 28, 2017 3:53 am
by TheButcher
Wonder Woman: Warner Bros. Plans Oscar Push for Best Picture, Director
Warner Bros. hopes to finally break the Academy Awards comic book movie stigma with Wonder Woman.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 12:22 pm
by Wolfpack
They'll probably award it to Get Out.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 5:11 pm
by Peven
Wolfpack wrote:They'll probably award it to Get Out.



do you have a problem with that? or is that the movie you think deserves to win...?

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 4:10 pm
by Wolfpack
Peven wrote:
Wolfpack wrote:They'll probably award it to Get Out.



do you have a problem with that? or is that the movie you think deserves to win...?


I don't care either way. The Oscars aren't meaningful to me. I just think it's the most likely one to win the top prize.

Re: OSKAHS 2016

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:39 pm
by Peven
Wolfpack wrote:
Peven wrote:
Wolfpack wrote:They'll probably award it to Get Out.



do you have a problem with that? or is that the movie you think deserves to win...?


I don't care either way. The Oscars aren't meaningful to me. I just think it's the most likely one to win the top prize.



I have mixed feelings about the Academy Awards. while I recognize that Best Picture doesn't always go to the true Best Picture they are still significant in recognizing films that stand out from the crowd. I first really got into film in my early 20's when I rented movies from a little independent store that had a "wall of Oscars" with the Best Picture winner for every year of the Academy Awards. I began renting at least one movie from the wall every time I would go in. I became a true fan of cinema during that time as I discovered a lot of great films, for example, I never would have seen a masterpiece like Midnight Cowboy otherwise. fyi, the only X-rated movie to win Best Picture. plus, even if you don't feel that the Best Picture is legit, the nominees are usually a pretty good selection to check out and are a good historical representation of film foor that given year. imho, of course :wink: