You HAVE To Check This Book Out! (Small Press Thread)

Graphic novels. Weekly rags. The @$$holes.

You HAVE To Check This Book Out! (Small Press Thread)

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 2:07 am

There is no doubt that the big two are dominating comic book sales. However, a growing number of smaller companies are now moving on up in the comic book world and they are producing some really great books.

So I figured I'd start this thread so that Zoners can alert people to some really amazing books that they might have overlooked.

To begin with, on May 17th the first issue of TALENT was released by Boom! Studios.

This book is AMAZING. It is like a mix of The X-Files and Lost. It has already been showered with critical praise and it deserves it. I strongly suggest you give it a shot.

So, what other books are out there that we are missing? What books do we just HAVE to check out?
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby The Garbage Man on Sun Jun 04, 2006 2:52 am

Image is not exactly small press, but I'd like to recommend Loaded Bible: Jesus vs. Vampires.

It's fun, the art is good, and it's got more going on upstairs than you might think.

Of course, you don't have to take my word for it...

Image
User avatar
The Garbage Man
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2558
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 3:27 pm
Location: The Big Blue Velour Marble

Postby Coldfire24 on Sun Jun 04, 2006 2:54 am

The Garbage Man wrote:Image is not exactly small press, but I'd like to recommend Loaded Bible: Jesus vs. Vampires.

It's fun, the art is good, and it's got more going on upstairs than you might think.

Of course, you don't have to take my word for it...

Image




Fuck yteahhhhhheeeeyeah
Image
Image
User avatar
Coldfire24
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 1566
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:26 am
Location: Mississippi State University...its not so bad

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 2:56 am

The Garbage Man wrote:Image is not exactly small press, but I'd like to recommend Loaded Bible: Jesus vs. Vampires.

It's fun, the art is good, and it's got more going on upstairs than you might think.


Is it actually about Jesus fighting Vampires??? That sounds quite interesting. Thanks a lot TGM.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby Coldfire24 on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:03 am

Go team Venture!
Image
Image
User avatar
Coldfire24
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 1566
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:26 am
Location: Mississippi State University...its not so bad

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:10 am

Coldfire24 wrote:Go team Venture!


Lets try to stay on topic here.

If you want to discuss the Venture Bros. go here:

http://zone.aintitcool.com/viewtopic.php?t=1028
Last edited by Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby The Garbage Man on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:10 am

Leckomaniac wrote:
The Garbage Man wrote:Image is not exactly small press, but I'd like to recommend Loaded Bible: Jesus vs. Vampires.

It's fun, the art is good, and it's got more going on upstairs than you might think.


Is it actually about Jesus fighting Vampires??? That sounds quite interesting. Thanks a lot TGM.


Not only that, but Jesus fighting vampires... in the future!

(The future, Conan?)

Leckomaniac wrote:
Coldfire24 wrote:Go team Venture!


Lets try to stay on topic here.

If you want to discuss the Venture Bros. go here:

http://zone.aintitcool.com/viewtopic.php?t=1028


Oh snap, B4NN3D!
Last edited by The Garbage Man on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
The Garbage Man
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2558
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 3:27 pm
Location: The Big Blue Velour Marble

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:11 am

The Garbage Man wrote:
Leckomaniac wrote:
The Garbage Man wrote:Image is not exactly small press, but I'd like to recommend Loaded Bible: Jesus vs. Vampires.

It's fun, the art is good, and it's got more going on upstairs than you might think.


Is it actually about Jesus fighting Vampires??? That sounds quite interesting. Thanks a lot TGM.


Not only that, but Jesus fighting vampires... in the future!

(The future, Conan?)


HA! That is awesome. Do you know who writes/draws the book?
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby The Garbage Man on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:13 am

Written by Tim Seeley, art by Nate Bellegarde and Mark Englert.

Of the three, I'm only familiar with Englert.
User avatar
The Garbage Man
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2558
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 3:27 pm
Location: The Big Blue Velour Marble

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:20 am

The Garbage Man wrote:Written by Tim Seeley, art by Nate Bellegarde and Mark Englert.

Of the three, I'm only familiar with Englert.


I have never read anything by Tim Seeley, but I have heard postitive things about his series Hack/Slash.

Thanks again TGM. Hopefully, people will learn about some real interesting books through this thread.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby The Garbage Man on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:32 am

No problem, Lecko.

I feel bad that I don't read a lot of indie stuff, but a guy only has so much money. Anyway, one book I've started getting into that's definitely not indie (it's by Vertigo) but is a smaller and lesser known book:

American Virgin.
Written by Steven T. Seagle, art by Becky Cloonan, covers by Frank Quitely.
It's about the son of two ministers/televangelists who is told by God that his girlfriend is the only woman for him, the only woman he'll ever love, and he must remain a virgin until he marries her. He takes his message of abstinence to the youth, writes a book, and begins a crusade based on "Saving It."
The real crux (religious pun unintended) is spoilerish: before they can get married his girlfriend is murdered, kicking off a quest for answers from God and vengeance from her killers.
User avatar
The Garbage Man
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 2558
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 3:27 pm
Location: The Big Blue Velour Marble

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:35 am

The Garbage Man wrote:No problem, Lecko.

I feel bad that I don't read a lot of indie stuff, but a guy only has so much money. Anyway, one book I've started getting into that's definitely not indie (it's by Vertigo) but is a smaller and lesser known book:

American Virgin.
Written by Steven T. Seagle, art by Becky Cloonan, covers by Frank Quitely.
It's about the son of two ministers/televangelists who is told by God that his girlfriend is the only woman for him, the only woman he'll ever love, and he must remain a virgin until he marries her. He takes his message of abstinence to the youth, writes a book, and begins a crusade based on "Saving It."
The real crux (religious pun unintended) is spoilerish: before they can get married his girlfriend is murdered, kicking off a quest for answers from God and vengeance from her killers.


Excellent suggestion. I have read all three issues of American Virgin thus far and have been totally impressed. When I heard the premise I kind of scratched my head. But I like to give new books a chance so I picked this one up. It really wasn't what I expected, but in a good way. I agree with you TGM, highly recdomended.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 3:41 am

Another IMAGE book that I would reccomend is Fear Agent. It is a great Sci-Fi book. It has a very "throwback" sort of feel to it. If you like good ol' fashion Sci-Fi in the vein of "The Day The Earth Stood Still", then I would consider checking out this book. Issue #5 is about to be released, but you can read the full first issue here:

http://www.newsarama.com/ImageComics/FearAgent/FearAgent01issue.htm

Image isn't exactly small press, but the book is still worth a look if you have some extra cash lying around.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Sun Jun 04, 2006 4:49 pm

Dark Horse is still "indie", no?

Mark Millar's Chosen, The Goon and Blade of the Immortal are some of my faves from that large indie.

Top Cow put out Millar's Wanted.

'Prolly not what you had in mind, but I sorely lack knowledge of the indie comic world.

oh, and SCOTT FUCKIN' PILGRIM, if I haven't made my Scottaholic addiction clear enough...
Personally, I'm an atheist in the voting booth and a theist in the movie theatre. I separate the morality of religion with the spirituality and solace of it. There is something boring about atheism.
User avatar
Keepcoolbutcare
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 9407
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 4:14 am
Location: Blacktionville

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 04, 2006 4:54 pm

No that was awesome KCBC. Because of that thread you started about Scott Pilgrim I actually went out and bought volume 1 and I loved it.

I would have never thought to pick that up so thanks.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Sun Jun 04, 2006 4:59 pm

keepcoolbutcare: Rating - Awesome!
Personally, I'm an atheist in the voting booth and a theist in the movie theatre. I separate the morality of religion with the spirituality and solace of it. There is something boring about atheism.
User avatar
Keepcoolbutcare
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 9407
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 4:14 am
Location: Blacktionville

Postby Adam Balm on Sat Jun 17, 2006 2:04 am

Okay, I realize this is breaking the small press rules of this thread, but this is an 'indie style' book at Marvel that has just been nominated for an Eisner, and it's just absolute brilliance...

Franklin Richards: Son of a Genius
Image

http://comicbookresources.com/news/newsitem.cgi?id=7583
Image
User avatar
Adam Balm
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 10806
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2005 7:59 pm
Location: factored in this happening when it has happened

Postby Kilgore on Sat Jun 17, 2006 2:22 am

Adam Balm wrote:Okay, I realize this is breaking the small press rules of this thread, but this is an 'indie style' book at Marvel that has just been nominated for an Eisner, and it's just absolute brilliance...

Franklin Richards: Son of a Genius
Image

http://comicbookresources.com/news/newsitem.cgi?id=7583


Ooooh, Bill Watterson's gonna be suin' SOMEBODY'S ass!

That looks cool though...thanks for the lead, it's Balmtastic!
Kilgore
AIRWOLF
 
Posts: 1051
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 8:33 pm

Postby Bob Samonkey on Sat Jun 17, 2006 2:35 am

Kilgore wrote:
Adam Balm wrote:Okay, I realize this is breaking the small press rules of this thread, but this is an 'indie style' book at Marvel that has just been nominated for an Eisner, and it's just absolute brilliance...

Franklin Richards: Son of a Genius
Image

http://comicbookresources.com/news/newsitem.cgi?id=7583


Ooooh, Bill Watterson's gonna be suin' SOMEBODY'S ass!

That looks cool though...thanks for the lead, it's Balmtastic!



You noticed that too? I also noticed it in a comic strip I read have been reading. Cow and Boy. It really is funny as well but it does scream Calvin and Hobbs...
User avatar
Bob Samonkey
Große Fäuste
 
Posts: 8982
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:49 pm
Location: Samonkey Island

Postby buster00 on Sat Jun 17, 2006 4:06 am

Y'know, I almost picked up that book last year when it came out, but the Calvin resemblence kinda scared me off. Maybe I'll backtrack for it now, based on the recommendation.

I'd like to see a window-sticker style pic of Franklin pissing all over H.E.R.B.I.E..


Switching gears, is anyone here reading Dark Horse's Arch Enemies mini? I bought (and liked) issue #1, but my regular comic shop never even got #2 or 3. Should I go back for those issues, or would it be a waste?
User avatar
buster00
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 6401
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 7:12 pm

Postby DennisMM on Mon Jun 19, 2006 10:50 am

How dare you compare the art in "Cow & Boy" to "Calvin and Hobbes"? "Cow and Boy" is static, whereas "Calvin" was energy untamed.

I picked up Franklin #1 but passed on the second collection. Just not my speed, I guess. Cute, but not particularly interesting to me.
Image
User avatar
DennisMM
NOT PARTICULARLY MENACING
 
Posts: 16813
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 5:02 pm
Location: Watchin' the reels go 'round and 'round

Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:46 pm

and to pre-emptively beat down anyone who claims I'm anit-Millar, I just read Chosen.

Holy.Fucking.Christ.

This, along with Wanted and Red Son, are among the finest comics I've ever had the pleasure to read. Millar should lecture Spielberg on the how to's of last acts, 'cuz all three of these have the most surprising, well earned conclusions I've ever come across, in any medium, EVAR.

Peter Gross just nails the tone that Millar was going for, there are several clues sprinkled throughout that readers far more savvy and informed than myself may be able to pick up on, and if the sequel that the two of them discuss in the afterword is a comin', I'm so there.

A near perfect read, didn't know Millar had this type of story in him. I can't wait to re-read it, and that's as damn fine a compliment I can give.
Personally, I'm an atheist in the voting booth and a theist in the movie theatre. I separate the morality of religion with the spirituality and solace of it. There is something boring about atheism.
User avatar
Keepcoolbutcare
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 9407
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 4:14 am
Location: Blacktionville

Postby Leckomaniac on Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:58 pm

Thanks for the mini-review KCBC. I haven't really been the biggest fan of Millar either...maybe I'll check this out.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby Keepcoolbutcare on Mon Jun 26, 2006 1:41 am

Leckomaniac wrote:Thanks for the mini-review KCBC. I haven't really been the biggest fan of Millar either...maybe I'll check this out.


that was a piss-poor review, but it's best going into it knowing as little as you can.

there's a riotous email exchange in the afterword, with the Dark Horse publishers begging Millar for some sort of synopsis, and him being super coy about it all.

MM - "Just trust me on this one. It's really good. I'm very excited".

Fuckin' brass ones on this guy!
So eventually he caves (a bit), tells 'em it's "supernatural/horror story" with the basic idea being...

The basic idea is Harry Potter for Christian fundamentalists. It's a book about Jesus set in the modern-day. Ultimate Jesus, if you like. {my bold} It's the book of revelations set in a small American town and seen from the perspective of a 12 year old boy


I'm getting weird and fixated again, aren't I?

Whatever, it's a HELL of a read...
Personally, I'm an atheist in the voting booth and a theist in the movie theatre. I separate the morality of religion with the spirituality and solace of it. There is something boring about atheism.
User avatar
Keepcoolbutcare
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 9407
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 4:14 am
Location: Blacktionville

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:42 am

Talent #2 is coming out soon...I suggest that you pick up issue #1 and #2...you will be impressed.

Plus, after the release of #1 Universal bought the rights and are making it into a movie. So might as well read pick it up and give it a shot!
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby buster00 on Thu Jul 13, 2006 6:08 am

I didn't hear anything about Transformers: Evolution until I saw the @ssholes' review on the main site.

Did anyone here pick up issue #1? The preview sketches in the link look pretty cool, and the idea of "Steampunk Transformers" appeals to me. Just wanted a second opinion if any of you guys have read it.
User avatar
buster00
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 6401
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 7:12 pm

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Sep 06, 2006 5:45 am

I decided to give this thread a bump.

I posted my review of LOCAL an indie comic by Brian Wood in the review thread. You can read it here

Or...for those of you who don't want to look around for it:

[quote]I just finished reading LOCAL #1 and #2 written by Brian Wood with art by Ryan Kelly.

Brian Wood is a rising star in comics. Demo, Supermarket, DMZ...the list of outstanding titles that this guy has written is becoming a bit ridiculous. The covers of LOCAL #1 and #2 come with endorsements from Warren Ellis and Brian K. Vaughan...two of the biggest names in the industry...and it is no surprise that they both enjoy the heck out of this book.

LOCAL, as Wood puts it, "is a series of short stories about people and the places they live in". A very simple premise, but an intriguing one nonetheless. Each issue takes place in a new location...for example the first issue takes place in Portland and the second in Minneapolis. Wood and Kelly go to great lengths to provide a realistic feel to each new location. In fact, they include legitimate shops and buildings...so if you are actually FROM Portland...you might recognize the drug store Megan goes into because it actually is there. This provides an added depth to the title.

Now, the main character of the book is Megan. However, Wood tells us at the end of the first issue that while Megan will make an appearance in every book, she will not always be the focus of the book. In some issues, her role will be limited to a cameo. Also, the first issue takes place in 1994...in each issue Megan will age one year. So issue 2 takes place in 1995. Wood and Kelly go to great lengths again to make sure that each issue is accurate to the date in which it takes place. Updating the character’s wardrobe slightly, car brands, etc. For instance, the drug store that is the location for issue #1 was there in 1994, but has since closed down. Obviously, a lot of work went into making this comic feel realistic for the reader.

Does all the hard work matter though? Is it worth a read? Most definitely. Wood and Kelly have created something really special with LOCAL. The artwork is especially gorgeous...Kelly does an outstanding jobs with these locations that make them feel real. Having been to Minneapolis I can honestly say that while reading this issue I felt like I was there again. The most important thing about LOCAL is that Wood's stories are so strong that they are not overshadowed by the art and the location. Each story is strong in its ownright and emotional. These are not huge, end of the world type stories, but instead, small stories that give you a glimpse into another person's life.

LOCAL is a perfect example of what the comic book medium can do. Each issue is like taking a road trip to a different city, if only for a small while. Strongly recommended.

“The Perfect three-minute single. You’re going to want this one.â€
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby doglips on Wed Sep 06, 2006 6:13 am

buster00 wrote:I didn't hear anything about Transformers: Evolution until I saw the @ssholes' review on the main site.

Did anyone here pick up issue #1? The preview sketches in the link look pretty cool, and the idea of "Steampunk Transformers" appeals to me. Just wanted a second opinion if any of you guys have read it.


Those design sketches of the steam powered Transformers are great!

Shockwave is brilliant, I'm going to have to check this book out. Have you read any of it Buster?
User avatar
doglips
MOD FAIRY
 
Posts: 6288
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2005 6:08 am

Postby doglips on Wed Sep 06, 2006 6:21 am

[quote="Leckomaniac"]I decided to give this thread a bump.

I posted my review of LOCAL an indie comic by Brian Wood in the review thread. You can read it here

Or...for those of you who don't want to look around for it:

[quote]I just finished reading LOCAL #1 and #2 written by Brian Wood with art by Ryan Kelly.

Brian Wood is a rising star in comics. Demo, Supermarket, DMZ...the list of outstanding titles that this guy has written is becoming a bit ridiculous. The covers of LOCAL #1 and #2 come with endorsements from Warren Ellis and Brian K. Vaughan...two of the biggest names in the industry...and it is no surprise that they both enjoy the heck out of this book.

LOCAL, as Wood puts it, "is a series of short stories about people and the places they live in". A very simple premise, but an intriguing one nonetheless. Each issue takes place in a new location...for example the first issue takes place in Portland and the second in Minneapolis. Wood and Kelly go to great lengths to provide a realistic feel to each new location. In fact, they include legitimate shops and buildings...so if you are actually FROM Portland...you might recognize the drug store Megan goes into because it actually is there. This provides an added depth to the title.

Now, the main character of the book is Megan. However, Wood tells us at the end of the first issue that while Megan will make an appearance in every book, she will not always be the focus of the book. In some issues, her role will be limited to a cameo. Also, the first issue takes place in 1994...in each issue Megan will age one year. So issue 2 takes place in 1995. Wood and Kelly go to great lengths again to make sure that each issue is accurate to the date in which it takes place. Updating the character’s wardrobe slightly, car brands, etc. For instance, the drug store that is the location for issue #1 was there in 1994, but has since closed down. Obviously, a lot of work went into making this comic feel realistic for the reader.

Does all the hard work matter though? Is it worth a read? Most definitely. Wood and Kelly have created something really special with LOCAL. The artwork is especially gorgeous...Kelly does an outstanding jobs with these locations that make them feel real. Having been to Minneapolis I can honestly say that while reading this issue I felt like I was there again. The most important thing about LOCAL is that Wood's stories are so strong that they are not overshadowed by the art and the location. Each story is strong in its ownright and emotional. These are not huge, end of the world type stories, but instead, small stories that give you a glimpse into another person's life.

LOCAL is a perfect example of what the comic book medium can do. Each issue is like taking a road trip to a different city, if only for a small while. Strongly recommended.

“The Perfect three-minute single. You’re going to want this one.â€
User avatar
doglips
MOD FAIRY
 
Posts: 6288
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2005 6:08 am

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Sep 06, 2006 6:27 am

[quote="thedoglippedone"][quote="Leckomaniac"] I decided to give this thread a bump.

I posted my review of LOCAL an indie comic by Brian Wood in the review thread. You can read it here

Or...for those of you who don't want to look around for it:

[quote]I just finished reading LOCAL #1 and #2 written by Brian Wood with art by Ryan Kelly.

Brian Wood is a rising star in comics. Demo, Supermarket, DMZ...the list of outstanding titles that this guy has written is becoming a bit ridiculous. The covers of LOCAL #1 and #2 come with endorsements from Warren Ellis and Brian K. Vaughan...two of the biggest names in the industry...and it is no surprise that they both enjoy the heck out of this book.

LOCAL, as Wood puts it, "is a series of short stories about people and the places they live in". A very simple premise, but an intriguing one nonetheless. Each issue takes place in a new location...for example the first issue takes place in Portland and the second in Minneapolis. Wood and Kelly go to great lengths to provide a realistic feel to each new location. In fact, they include legitimate shops and buildings...so if you are actually FROM Portland...you might recognize the drug store Megan goes into because it actually is there. This provides an added depth to the title.

Now, the main character of the book is Megan. However, Wood tells us at the end of the first issue that while Megan will make an appearance in every book, she will not always be the focus of the book. In some issues, her role will be limited to a cameo. Also, the first issue takes place in 1994...in each issue Megan will age one year. So issue 2 takes place in 1995. Wood and Kelly go to great lengths again to make sure that each issue is accurate to the date in which it takes place. Updating the character’s wardrobe slightly, car brands, etc. For instance, the drug store that is the location for issue #1 was there in 1994, but has since closed down. Obviously, a lot of work went into making this comic feel realistic for the reader.

Does all the hard work matter though? Is it worth a read? Most definitely. Wood and Kelly have created something really special with LOCAL. The artwork is especially gorgeous...Kelly does an outstanding jobs with these locations that make them feel real. Having been to Minneapolis I can honestly say that while reading this issue I felt like I was there again. The most important thing about LOCAL is that Wood's stories are so strong that they are not overshadowed by the art and the location. Each story is strong in its ownright and emotional. These are not huge, end of the world type stories, but instead, small stories that give you a glimpse into another person's life.

LOCAL is a perfect example of what the comic book medium can do. Each issue is like taking a road trip to a different city, if only for a small while. Strongly recommended.

“The Perfect three-minute single. You’re going to want this one.â€
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby doglips on Wed Sep 06, 2006 6:32 am

Yeah, I bought it a few weeks ago, it's great. I'll try and throw together a mini-review later.
User avatar
doglips
MOD FAIRY
 
Posts: 6288
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2005 6:08 am

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Sep 06, 2006 6:37 am

thedoglippedone wrote:Yeah, I bought it a few weeks ago, it's great. I'll try and throw together a mini-review later.


Awesome. I look forward to reading your review. Like I said I will definitely be thumbing through SLOTH on Thursday when I hit the comic shop.

By the way...I loved the first issue Phonogram. I really look forward to #2. The glossary at the back was an excellent idea. Some of the references did go a bit over my head so it was good to have the glossary handy.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Postby Leckomaniac on Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:28 pm

I am bumping this thread to implore people to start reading Brian Wood's DMZ. It is incredible. Pick up the first volume and pick up issue #12 which acts as a guide. DMZ follows the adventures of Matt Roth...a naive young intern thrust into the middle of a modern day Civil War set in NY. Wood crafts an immensely captivating story that will knock your sock off, fold them, and put them in the proper drawer for you.

Trust me. This book IS one of the best books available at the moment.

For those interested you can download the first issue in PDF format here. I would strongly, STRONGLY suggest that you do.
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Re: Starstruck

Postby TheButcher on Wed Aug 25, 2010 5:25 pm

From Newsarama 17 June 2009:
The Starstruck Chronicles, I: Bringing Starstruck Back
The Starstruck Chronicles II: Helping Gene Colan
Zack Smith wrote:The last few years have seen a renaissance of reprints, ranging from classic comic strips to runs by legendary creators. And once in a while, an underappreciated gem gets a new chance to shine.

Such is the case of Starstruck, a universe-spanning adventure whose history involves multiple publishers, formats and mediums. Beginning as a stage play, it became a series of stories in Heavy Metal, then a series in Marvel’s Epic imprint, then a continuation at Dark Horse. Now, it’s being reissued in an all-new, updated edition, and even becoming a series of audio adventures, the first of which will serve as a charity reading to help comics legend Gene Colan.

Starstruck will be reissued by IDW Publishing starting in August as a 13-issue limited series. But this is no mere reprinting. In addition to being completely recolored by renowned fantasy artist Lee Moyer, series creators Elaine Lee and Michael William Kaluta have reworked the original material, including reformatting pages, expanding images, and all-new “Galactic Girl Guide” material inked by Charles Vess.

To take us through this massive story, Newsarama was privileged to talk with Elaine Lee, Michael William Kaluta and Lee Moyer about a book that Clive Barker called “one of the most brave and elegant experiments in comic book storytelling.” In our three-part talk, we’ll also give you a preview of the new, remastered pages. Ladies and gentlemen...Starstruck, as you’ve never seen it before.



From IDW:
First serialized in Heavy Metal Magazine, then a Marvel graphic novel and comic series... and now finally back in print after nearly 20 years, Michael Kaluta's amazing Starstruck-completely remastered and with incredible new color by Lee Moyer-is back and looking better than ever!

Each issue also contains an episode of Galactic Girl Guides, by the same creative team.

Written by Elaiine Lee, with art by Kaluta and Charles Vess.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: IDW's "Parker: The Martini Edition"

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:03 pm

WC11: IDW Goes Deluxe for Stevens & "Parker"
Shaun Manning wrote:In addition to announcing a new "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" series and "Walter Simonson's The Mighty Thor: Artist's Edition," IDW Publishing revealed two additional prestige hardcovers at WonderCon, one focusing on the little-seen sketches of a beloved artist and the other presenting one of the publisher's most acclaimed series of graphic novels in a new, oversized format. CBR News spoke with editor Scott Dunbier about the "Dave Stevens Sketchbook" and "Parker: The Martini Edition," which collects the first two of Darwyn Cooke's Parker books at a larger size and with additional material.

Shaun Manning wrote:Dunbier spoke about "Richard Stark's Parker: The Martini Edition," which collects Darwyn Cooke's lauded adaptations of "The Hunter" and "The Outfit" at a size similar to the "Man with the Getaway Face" preview comic, which bridged the gap between the Parker graphic novels. "It's called the 'Parker Martini Edition,' because we wanted something that got the feel of the book," Dunbier said. "Fans really reacted very well to the 'Man with the Getaway Face' preview comic we did last year, which was 8x12 inches. We are actually doing the Martini Edition a little bit larger than that, it will be 9x13 inches, it will have a slipcase, it will be 344 pages. That'll contain both of the graphic novels that Darwyn did -- both of them were pretty widely acclaimed. It'll have a number of illustrations, sketchbook material, a lot of cool little extras. One of the best is, it'll actually have an original eight-page story that will only be available in this Martini Edition."

Though the "Man with the Getaway Face" is the most immediate influence for "Parker: The Martini Edition," the deluxe volume also continues a pattern in Dunbier's editorial interests. "Anybody who knows my past history knows that I like to do big books," Dunbier laughed. He was also responsible for DC Comics' Absolute Edition line and of course IDW's own Artist's Edition books are presented at a larger size. "Part of it's just my general nature likes to do things like this."

Even with his avowed interest in big books, though, Dunbier recognizes that not every artist would benefit from the large-as-life treatment. "If you look at Darwyn's work, he's a very interesting artist in that his art works on a number of different levels. We do the regular graphic novels, they come at 6x9 inches, which is considerably smaller than 8x12. It works perfectly in that size and format, but I think it works just as well in that larger size, too. And a lot of artists can't do that. You have a guy who is printed very small and it looks great, but then you blow it up and it doesn't look quite as good. But with Darwyn, the nature of his style allows it to be large and small and not lose what makes it special."

With two more Parker books coming from Cooke in the future, it's a safe bet there will be a second Martini Edition, as well. "It would kind of seem like a wasted opportunity if we didn't," Dunbier said. "I would think that probably just having one on your bookshelf isn't enough."
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: You HAVE To Check This Book Out! (Small Press Thread)

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:05 pm

CBR @ WC10:
Darwyn Cooke Spotlight Panel
The tone for Darwyn Cooke's Saturday afternoon spotlight panel at this year's WonderCon was set right at the beginning, as moderator Scott Dunbier, Cooke's editor on his IDW "Parker" series of graphic novels, asked the crowd, "You want a rundown of his career?" Laughing, Cooke answered "Nooooooooooo," and then said that he would rather answer audience questions instead of solemnly reflect on his work to date. "I think these [spotlight] panels, generally, are rather boring," he admitted, before giving fans an hour that was anything but.

Asked why "Parker" creator Donald Westlake had allowed Cooke to use the name of his character instead of renaming him, as in movie adaptations of the novels, Cooke joked, "My wonderful singing voice seduced him," before saying that his intended approach eventually won the author over: "If he was going to let someone use the name, he wanted someone to commit on a deeper level. He could tell I wasn't interested in taking his work and interpreting it in an abstract way. He knew I was interested in doing a series, [and] he knew I was very sincere." The book's period setting, keeping it in the time setting in which it was originally written, was an example of Cooke's sincerity; he said that he had told Westlake, "I think your words are perfect," and not updating the material allowed him to "keep it as true as to what he'd written."

Dunbier talked about receiving an email from Westlake in response to an initial pitch on the project, where the author talked about Cooke's previous works. He said that he knew there was a chance Westlake would eventually agree when he saw the last line of the email, in which Westlake had ended a long list of reasons why the project wouldn't work by saying, "But this guy is really good." Cooke laughed that Westlake had never told him that, adding that the writer hadn't been impressed with early work Cooke produced for the project: "The first batch of artwork I sent him, he didn't like it at all." Amongst other advice Westlake offered was that Cooke pull back on the passion he tended to give his central characters: "He kept bouncing it back. He said, think of him as a carpenter. He's a man of his trade... The minute I thought of him as a guy with a toolbox, that's when it clicked for me."

Asked how his work on the Parker books would influence future projects, Cooke said that the series has had a "great effect" on him, and is so rewarding that it ceases to feel like work. "I'm producing cartoons that reflect me. It's taken me to a great place." That doesn't mean that his post-"Parker" projects will be more of the same, however: "It'll push me in an opposite direction, to be honest. By that, I mean something more optimistic... Hopefully, it'll make me a better storyteller, and push me in a different direction."

Those new projects, he said in response to a question from the Comic Reporter's Tom Spurgeon, may come as early as the end of 2011; although he didn't talk more about that, he did talk about a project he feels he's not ready to tackle yet: "I want to do an incredible fantasy that's going to appeal to children and have long-lasting appeal. I hope at some time, I'll have the facility and clarity to do it." He admitted that, although he's enjoying working on the "Parker" books, "it's been really hard for me to put my own thing on hold. [Ed] Brubaker is giving me a hard time, but I'm like, 'Ed, I work with better writers than me.' If I have to choose between me and Donald Westlake, I'll choose Westlake."

That doesn't mean that he doesn't give his artists an easy ride. Admitting that he "beats up" writers ("The only writer whose words I haven't touched is Peter Milligan's," he said), Cooke described an example of his ability to fight for what he believes is the best story possible: At the end of his four issue 2001 run on the relaunched "Catwoman" title, he felt so dissatisfied with Ed Brubaker's original finale that he refused to work on the book for two weeks before plotting, and submitting an all-new climax that he felt made Catwoman a stronger character. "[Editor Matt] Idelson said, 'This doesn't match the script,' and I said, 'I know. I wouldn't draw that.'" Brubaker was forced to rewrite his script around the finished pages, despite (thankfully short-lived) animosity. "I found a way to patch it all up and we're good friends now," Cooke said.

He talked about the ways in which working on the "Parker" series was a risk as a creator: "You get worried because of how far your readers will go with you. 'Are they my readers or Green Lantern's readers?' I was worried. I sweated that, I sweated that a lot." Part of his concern was the rougher style of art, which he said he'd been consciously avoiding since an earlier attempt in the "Catwoman" prologue that ran in issues of "Detective Comics" in 2001 met with editorial disapproval: "You're trying to make a living, and you don't want to alienate the guy, so you drop it, (but) if you look at those Slam Bradley pages and 'The Hunter,' they look like they were done a couple of weeks apart." This was a symptom of a larger problem, he suggested, as creators try to meet expectations of fans and editors: "It's hard to explain, and I'm not whining, but in the mainstream direct market, none of us are drawing they way we want to draw," he said, before saying that his "Parker" art was influenced by the way in which Joe Kubert's art became looser in the 1960s: "It gets harder as you get older. I loosened up to hide that I was getting decrepit (by pretending that) I was already getting decrepit."

When asked about the origins of his distinctive styles, he called it "a disaster with characteristically great timing." He first tried to break into the comic industry in 1994, when Image's cross-hatching and detailed rendering was the hot look, but purposefully tried to stay true to his own tastes. "I always thought, I don't want t be part of the crowd, even if I fail. A lot of people said, 'This is pretty good, but you're not going to get any work.'" Noting that his 1994 submission for "Batman: Ego" took 6 years to become a comic, he joked, "People ask me, 'How do you get into the business?' I dunno. Dumb luck."

Later, he expanded on this by saying that he'd made a name for himself by staying true to his own tastes and style instead of trying to fit in. Calling Eduardo Risso "the modern master of page layout," he went on to say "Every time I try to do page layout, it fails... It's about finding a place." His place, he said, was the strength of his storytelling. When he was breaking into the industry, he said, "Image had taken over and storytelling had been left on the side of the street with a condom in its ass."

Despite the isx year delay, "Ego" wasn't his only project to require patience. When it was finally released in 2000, DC's editor Mark Chiarello asked for a proposal for a follow-up, which eventually became 2003's award-winning "DC: The New Frontier," a project that Cooke almost walked away from when Dan Didio suggested updating the setting to the modern day ("It should be easy to do," Cooke paraphrased Didio as saying, "Space capsule, space shuttle..."). To a somewhat surprised audience, Cooke said that he told Didio that he'd rather walk away from the project altogether than update it. Two days after walking away from the project, Didio relented on the period setting, and Cooke began work. "There's nothing heroic about it," he said. "I was just old enough to know I was going to get hosed if I let these guys drive my bus."

Not that Cooke isn't aware of what he perceives as his own shortcomings, namely, coloring and lettering. Asked about the use of color in "Parker: The Hunter," he said, "I don't think I'm good at it. It takes me two days, it takes Dave (Stewart, Cooke's colorist on projects like "DC: The New Frontier" and "Catwoman: Selina's Big Score") two minutes. It's hard for my self-esteem. It's a horrible experience." Nonetheless, he hand-colors and hand-letters the "Parker" books, working only with period-specific tools. "I wanted every day to be 1962 when I was drawing," he explained. Of course, he's not rejecting technology down the line: "I think there's a spastic nature to my lettering. But you don't see it, because I fix it all in Photoshop."

Asked what he's currently reading, Cooke mentioned James Ellroy's latest novel before saying, "I'm not a literate man, I'm not a learned man. I read for entertainment. I don't read as much as I want to... I can't find enough to interest me." When asked specifically about comics, he paraphrased John Reed with a smile: "Comics? For God sakes, I'm a 47 year old man, I don't read comics." He does, however, collect comic art; he talked about owning artwork by Jack Kirby, Neal Adams, Lee Elias, Joe Kubert and Alex Toth, whom he called "probably one of the most primary influences on me [and] probably one of the greatest designers and craftsmen of the American comics industry." Praising his design and storytelling skills, he added "I also thought he had this incredibly cool aesthetic. It just looked wicked cool."

Currently, Cooke's future consists of more "Parker;" he plans four books, but he can't guarantee which novels they'll adapt, as the choices change as he continues to work on the series. After that, he'll "absolutely" work on more noir stories, he said, adding "I'll probably take a break after 'Parker.' It's like, lasagna's your favorite food, but you eat it day and night for five years, and you'll never want to eat it again." That over-familiarity has chased him away, he said, from superhero work for the time being; when asked what it would take to get him back to either Marvel or DC, he said bluntly, "Money is the only thing. But it'd have to be buckets of money. Right now, I feel like the happiest guy in the world, I make enough for me and Marsha to live on. So it'd have to be buckets of money." Enough, he joked, to buy a whole new body for Gene Colan and pay for the surgery to attach his head.

With the panel ending by Cooke telling fans to buy IDW's $2 oversized con-exclusive preview of the next "Parker" book, October's "The Outfit," perhaps it's time for publishers to start saving.
Last edited by TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 10:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: IDW Artist’s Edition Books

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:37 pm

Walt Simonson And The Mighty Thor To Get IDW Artist’s Edition
Rich Johnston wrote:Scott Dunbier was the man who created the Absolute format at DC, showcasing comic book work in a very European high quality oversized fashion.

Then at IDW he created the Artist’s Edition, effectively reproducing original art boards bound in a volume, with the Dave Stevens’ Rocketeer: Artist’s Edition.

Well now there is a second Artist Edition. In an unprecedented deal with Marvel Comics, IDW will publish the Walt Simonson’s The Mighty Thor: Artist’s Edition, recreating original art boards for the Marvel series. Reproducing pencils under the ink, blue lines, yellow pages, whiteout, essentially what Walt submitted to his editors, at 12″ x 17″ size, 176 pages containing issues 337-340 and360-362 for $100, published in July.

And what’s more, there are more Marvel art projects to come, with different artists and different projects.

Damn. So… who and what do you want to see next?
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: IDW Artist’s Edition Books

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:38 pm

CBR @ WC11:
IDW Lifts the Hammer for "MIghty Thor Artist's Edition"
Shaun Manning wrote:In perhaps the biggest surprise announcement of WonderCon, IDW Publishing revealed that it will publish Artist's Edition books of several classic Marvel Comics stories, beginning with Walter Simonson's "The Mighty Thor." The Artist's Edition format, in which original comics pages are reproduced at full-size, without coloring or other alterations, debuted last year with "Dave Stevens' The Rocketeer: Artist's Edition," and proved a popular and critical success for IDW. "Walter Simonson's The Mighty Thor: The Artist's Edition" will collect issues #337-340 and 360-362, two arcs featuring Beta Ray Bill that Simonson wrote, pencilled and inked. CBR News spoke with editor Scott Dunbier, who oversees this and other IDW premiere lines, about the project and what else might be coming up in this format.

Dunbier told CBR that he'd long been interested in the Artist's Edition concept. "It's something that I wanted to do for a long time, a beautiful art book that would collect stories in a purely natural form, without any coloring, without any cleanup, actually photographing the work so you can see it in its base element, as original art," he said.

"['Rocketeer: The Artist's Edition'] was an expensive undertaking, but luckily people responded to it. And I thought they would, because people really do appreciate beautiful books and beautiful art, and you can't get much more beautiful than Dave Stevens," Dunbier continued. "But after we did the Artist's Edition, I started thinking about different types of things that are available. I had a few ideas, but I kept coming back to Marvel. Marvel obviously has an incredible publishing history. Some of the greatest artists ever to work in comics worked at Marvel. Leading up to San Diego Comic-Con last year, I approached some people at Marvel. I sent them copies of the Stevens Artist's Edition book when we had advance copies, and I've got to say they were pretty blown away by it. It was a pretty refreshing attitude they came into this with. They looked at this book and said, 'Wow, this is something that we would want to have on our bookshelves. It took several months, but we talked back and forth and eventually we struck a deal. The first book will be 'Walter Simonson's The Mighty Thor: Artist's Edition.' That'll be coming out at San Diego Comic-Con. I couldn't be more excited about it. That will be the first of the Marvel Artist's Editions we'll be doing."

As to what makes Simonson's art ideal for the format, Dunbier said "there are a number of different factors," including practical matters of accessibility. "One of the most basic things, obviously to do an Artist Edition you have to have access to the original art. Walter is one of those artists who does not enjoy parting with his work, and so he has a very large percentage of what he's done over the years still in his possession. So I was able to just go over to his house and scan the work," Dunbier told CBR. "But as far as what makes his work in particular suited to an Artist's Edition, you look at his work and it's the raw vitality, the raw energy, of a Walter Simonson page. It bursts off the paper. You look at it and it's glorious to behold.

"He would laugh at that, by the way. He'd say, 'Oh, go on!'" Dunbier laughed.

Dunbier noted that Artist's Editions differ from other art-focused books or publications reprinting original art because they collect complete stories. "With 'Rocketeer,' we were missing a grand total of two pages, that we did print from black and white stats, but the pages were there -- we were missing two originals in that case," the editor said. "In the case of Walter's 'Thor,' we had every single page of the seven issues that we're collecting."

For aspiring artists hoping to learn from Simonson's, Stevens', and other artists' raw art, Dunbier said, a book such as this "really is invaluable." "You can go to comic book shows and see who's hanging out around original art tables, it's always fans but also a lot of pencillers, inkers, people who want to learn from a great artist. Looking at this book, or the Dave Stevens book since it's already out, you can see every brush stroke. You can see every bit of whiteout and blue pencil. You get the feeling of really being able to piece together what an artist was thinking. It's there for you to discover if you can read it properly. And nothing beats looking at great art by a great artist."

Asked who might be the subject of future Marvel Artist's Edition volumes, Dunbier laughed, "I'm not going to tell you." He did offer that "we actually have a fair number of Artist's Editions that we're working on, at San Diego we'll probably announce a couple more at least. I'm always trying to think of new Artist Editions to do."

"Walter Simonson's The Mighty Thor: The Artist's Edition" will be released this summer from IDW Publishing.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: You HAVE To Check This Book Out! (Small Press Thread)

Postby Leckomaniac on Sat Apr 02, 2011 4:48 pm

Gosh, does that sound fantastic.

Glad to see this thread brought back to life. So, in the spirit that it was created:

Return of the Dapper Men is a fantastic book and well worth your time.

Also, the upcoming Image book (who are technically small press) Nonplayer looks like it is going to be a visual treat. Check it out here.

This week also saw the release of Butcher Baker Righteous Maker, from Mike Carey which you can check out here if you like over-the-top violence and political satire of the not-so-subtle variety.
Image
User avatar
Leckomaniac
AIRWOLF PLUS
 
Posts: 11031
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:32 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Re: You HAVE To Check This Book Out! (Small Press Thread)

Postby Pacino86845 on Sat Apr 02, 2011 6:28 pm

Hmm, I figured getting into those Marvel Omnibus releases would be a neat way to appreciate the artwork of the classics especially, but that Artist's Edition idea certainly tops that. You don't get as much story, which is not the point I suppose. It's essentially a bunch of prints of the original art for those who can't afford it, or of those pieces that are basically impossible to get.
User avatar
Pacino86845
EGYPTIAN LOVER
 
Posts: 14064
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 5:20 am

Re: Nonplayer

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:46 am

From Bleeding Cool:
Nonplayer Is Coming…
Rich Johnston wrote:At WonderCon this week, there were a few hundred copies of Nonplayer by Nate Simpson for sale, ahead of this Wednesday’s release. They sold fast, one per person. I understand it looked a little like the above.

And here’s the response on Twitter.
shopofideas
Wed. NONPLAYER #1. NATE SIMPSON! This book is beautiful! The plot is actually awesome, but seriously look at this…

AlexSanch
Hey it was awesome meeting you, absolutely LOVE Nonplayer

ronxo
The two things that totally lived up to the hype at WonderCon: Nonplayer by @NateSonOfSimp + the @gameofthrones marketing – very impressed

RobertKirkman:
Just read NONPLAYER by @natesonofsimp and I gotta say, I think it totally exceeds the hype.

RyanHigginsRyan
Nonplayer is gorgeous. @NateSonOfSimp is gonna be huge…

philipsytan
know what’s d best thing I came across in Wondercon so far? NateSimpson’s #NONPLAYER from image comics.. Dang I’m jealous o how pretty it is

theblairbutler
side note: Just read #wondercon purchases Nonplayer 1 and Walking Dead 83. Mind = Blown

BridgeCityComx
Coming in on Wednesday: NONPLAYER #1, one of the BEST new comics in a while! http://fb.me/UMZmyFWP

theycallmeninja
Picked up and read fantastic new comic called Nonplayer by @NateSonOfSimp.

stephenchristy
This is hands-down the best single-issue comic of #Wondercon: NONPLAYER

ChrisPartin
No doubt! NONPLAYER is amazing!

BarryCrain
“Nonplayer” asks the question, What if Moebius and Eric Shanower had a baby, and William Stout raised him?

Erulite
Just finished reading Nonplayer 1 as well. So good, and gorgeous! Thank you #wondercon.

ChristianLipski
Oh, and I met @NateSonOfSimp and nabbed a copy of NONPLAYER, suckas. Hella rad

Jeremy_Holt
For all that haven’t met @NateSonofSimp, you’re missin’ out. Great guy with a bitchin’ new comic out. Follow this man and pick up NONPLAYER.



From IGN January 28, 2011:
Image Comics Dabbles in MMOs
Joey Esposito wrote:Nate Simpson, formerly a concept artist within the video game industry, recently took a year off to "learn how to make comics." A year later, Image Comics has announced Nonplayer, a new six-issue mini-series that blends Simpson's gorgeous artwork with the world of MMO gaming.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: NONPLAYER

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:58 am

The Next Big Thing: Nate Simpson Talks NONPLAYER
The Outhouse: For readers who haven't heard of the book, what's Nonplayer about?

Nate Simpson: Nonplayer follows the exploits of Dana Stevens, a tamale delivery girl in the future who spends most of her time inside a full-immersion MMO called "Warriors of Jarvath." Unbeknownst to her, The AI-driven characters within the game have recently achieved sentience, and they've decided they don't like being hunted for sport. When she kills the wife of celebrity game character King Heremoth, she ends up on the receiving end of a major blood vendetta.

OH: What was the inspiration behind Nonplayer?

NS: I'm not sure if I can point to just one inspiration -- Nonplayer contains ingredients from the works of Hayao Miyazaki, Ray Kurzweil, Vernor Vinge, Moebius, and Geof Darrow, among others. Specifically, it was Miyazaki's storyboards for Nausicaa that got me to start thinking about world-building as a career.


(Super) Advance Review: Nonplayer #1
If there's an idea that you can rather readily get behind these days, it's that when a comic book comes out from Image and has a fresh #1 on it you're going to want to buy that comic. They proved that beyond the shadow of a doubt over the past year with fantastic first issues for both minis and ongoings. On top of that, we've recently seen Image take unknown creators and absolutely launch their careers above and beyond with their work, making Image one of the hottest companies to watch in terms of output.

Then there is Nonplayer #1 by Nate Simpson.

There is a review behind the cut, but I'm going to tell you right now that as much as I have to say about the comic, you don't need to read my review. I can very firmly tell you that you're going to want to buy this comic. You are. I read this comic immediately after seeing preview art with no real knowledge of the story, and I can very firmly say that I was blown away with my blind read. I was so blown away that I didn't even put the solicit information at the top of this review like we normally do, if only because going in without any previous knowledge was such a rewarding experience.

Today is the final order cut-off date for the comic, which is set to release April 6th for $2.99. So do yourself a favor: go to your local shop and make sure you are getting a copy of this comic.

However, if you really need a full explanation why, click behind the cut for the full review and solicit.


Game On: Nate Simpson's "Nonplayer"
Long time video game designer Nate Simpson has stepped aside from that world to create something wholly his own with "Nonplayer" a six issue Image Comics miniseries kicking off in early April. Following the adventures of Dana Stevens as her online video game adventures begin to infect her real life, "Nonplayer" has been the recipient of a wave of online buzz before a single issue hits the stands thanks in large part to Simpson's highly detailed artwork.

"My style is very heavily influenced by comic artists, especially Geof Darrow, Moebius and William Stout," Simpson told CBR NEws. "Arthur Rackham is also a big hero of mine. I'm really impressed by a lot of the concept art that gets made these days, especially by guys like Craig Mullins and Vinod Rams, but I never really had a knack for that painterly approach. I was often told -- usually as part of a rejection letter -- that my style was 'too comic-like.' So I finally took those comments to heart and moved over to comics!"


In the gorgeous comic Nonplayer, World of Warcraft goes cyberpunk
io9 recently got a sneak peek at Nate Simpson's upcoming Image Comics series Nonplayer. This handsome comic follows players of Warriors of Jarvath, a futuristic massive multiplayer online game that may have evolved past its programming.

After checking out the inaugural issue of this title, we were blown away by Simpson's meticulous artwork, which bridges the MMORPG's swords-and-swashbuckling realms with near-future 21st century trappings. Nonplayer's script follows Dana Stevens, a tamale delivery girl (shades of Hiro Protagonist) who spends most of her days jacked in to Jarvath, a World of Warcraft-style fantasy world where players organize raids to gain experience and online prestige (and to escape their meatspace responsibilities).


Escape with Image Comics into the Fantasy of Nonplayer


Newcomer Nate Simpson Debuts at Image with "Nonplayer"


'Nonplayer' by Nate Simpson: The Next Image Comics Classic [Preview]


ADVANCE REVIEW: Nonplayer #1
Last edited by TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 10:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Green Wake

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:58 am

The Next Nonplayer – Green Wake?
A week and a half away, we already know that Nonplayer by Nate Simpson from Image Comics will be the big breakout hit of 2011. It’s a given. Joining Chew, Morning Glories, Skullkickers and 27 as Image breakout hits. But what else is coming out shortly that may challenge it?

Kurtis Wiebe and Riley Rossmo give us a tale that seems ripped from Vertigo and, like Chew, one they probably turned down. A tale of a town that seems very much like purgatory, far more than the locations seen in Lost or Twin Peaks. In that its denizens are lost, are trapped, there are rumours of a gleming city somewhere near.

And we meet two detectives in this town investigating that rare thing, a murder. Both are human but one is looking distinctively less.

But this is not just some kind of CSI: Limbo, it’s a disjointed journey of a separated man and a woman, with a foreshadowing of disaster ahead. This is not Undying Love, this is Love That Rotten A Long Time Ago But Is Still Dragging Them Along. It’s dirty, it’s rancid, it smells off the page. And it’s pure dead brilliant. ANd I want a Carl plushie please,

Green Wake is published on the 6th April from Image Comics.
Last edited by TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 10:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Blue Estate

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:58 am

The Next Nonplayer – Blue Estate?
Blue Estate by Viktor Kavalchev, Kiosta Yanev, Andrew Osbourne, Tony Cypress, Nathan Fox and Robert Valley, is most definitely a noir comic, without any of the supernatural trappings of Undying Love and Green Wake. It’s LA crime steeped in Hollywood with private detectives, red haired femme fatales with their own agenda, lots of money and a corrupt police force. It’s smart, fresh, good looking and just the kind of thing anyone who enjoyed LA Confidential will lap up.

The first issue does fall under the trap of narrated events a little too much, almost like a Bluewater biography, but with much dirtier details and, of course, fictional. And, yes, it seems perfect as a movie pitch. But hey, I like movie pitches, often more than the movies themselves…

Blue Estate is published by Image Comics on April 6th.
Last edited by TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 10:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: NONPLAYER

Postby TheButcher on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:07 pm

New Artist Opening Eyes with Image's Games Comic NONPLAYER

20 years ago if you wanted to be a sword-wielding warrior or a powerful mage you had to live out your fantasies fumbling through a Dungeons & Dragons guidebook with friends. Now you can live out those fantasies in video games. Think about the huge leap in technology that’s occurred in just 20 years – and then imagine what it could look like twenty years from now.

In the upcoming Image series Nonplayer, artist Nate Simpson introduces readers to a twenty-something named Dana Simpson who isn’t in a hurry to grow up in real life, but spends hours leveling up in games. Dana splits time from her hum-drum life in a time several years in the future and the engrossing sword-and-sorcery realm inside a MMORPG video game. Although she’s years past her 18th birthday, she continues to live at home with her mom and escapes to the video game world where the tables are turned and she’s an elite warrior. But when she messes with the wrong character in this fantasy world, she begins to feel the effects not just online but in her real life as well.

Set for debut on April 6, Nonplayer is the auspicious debut from a creator that comes to comics with years of experience as a video game artist. You may not know the games Nate Simpson worked on, but you’ll know his skill when you get a look at the series. Comics’ heavyweights as far reaching as Frank Cho, Warren Ellis and Moebius have expressed admiration for his work – and it looks like when the comic is on shelves the world might too.
Last edited by TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 10:09 pm, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: NONPLAYER

Postby TheButcher on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:08 pm

Nate Simpson and Nonplayer: The Bleeding Cool Interview
Nate Simpson is the creator of upcoming comic book smash Nonplayer that Bleeding Cool has sunk all its frankly spurious credibility into. In an attempt to buoy interest in the comic and, vicariously, justify this website’s existence, I talked to Nate Simpson about his work on the book. And managed to hardly talk about the book at all. Well, at least you don’t have to worry about spoilers.
Last edited by TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 10:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Green Wake

Postby TheButcher on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:09 pm

From CBR:
5-STAR REVIEW: "Green Wake" #1
"Green Wake" is the strongest debut of 2011. It crafts a tale of emotion and murder against an ethereal backdrop of mystery and metaphor. This is a noir tale of a man investigating the strange new world around him while also trying to get to the truth at the heart of himself, perhaps at the heart of the human condition. To feel and to love mean only to eventually lose and to hate. Then you end up on the shores of Green Wake with blurry memories and the clothes on your back. There you remain.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: PIGS

Postby TheButcher on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:10 pm

WC11 EXCLUSIVE: Cosby & McCool's "Pigs"
Nate Cosby and Ben McCool spoke exclusively with CBR about their Image title "Pigs" which takes a long, hard look at the personal aspect of an America-based terror cell tasked with overthrowing the US government.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: You HAVE To Check This Book Out! (Small Press Thread)

Postby TheButcher on Fri Apr 08, 2011 2:54 pm

Would IDW Restart Transformers From Marvel Continuity?
Rich Johnston wrote:It all began with a question and answer session that long time Transformers comic book writer Simon Furman did on his blog and the IDW forums.

He wrote “I actually would like to pick up the baton from Marvel issue #80 and run with it again. There was a lot we never got to do, that I’d like to revisit or just to take the next big steps with all that we’d set up in the previous 20 or so issues.”

IDW had done this with their GI Joe series, but with Transformers the older Marvel continuity was junked, even if IDW had just reprinted almost all of it in classic collectionsm, and have used creators from that series…

The IDW forums seemed to support Simon’s position. Before you knew it there was a petition.

Then original series artist who drew eleven of the final twelve Marvel issues, Andrew Wildman chipped in:
“A while ago myself and Simon Furman considered the idea of picking up where we left off with the old Marvel Comics run of Transformers. For me it came about because after doing a series of six covers IDW asked me to do some interior art for their Transformers book. I wasn’t particularly interested in doing any so they asked me what it would take to do some. Well the obvious amswer would be copious amounts of dallar but to be honest it wasn’t about that. It was more to do with the fact that I was happy to just do cover art for Transformers and that I am busy doing other stuff these days. I gave it some thought though and put to them that it would be possible under a couple of conditions. First was that I would want to work with Simon Furman. Second was that we would want to do something that had a point. Something that felt like it was really saying something. I came up with the gist of an idea and put it to Simon. He ran with it and things began to take shape. What was clear was that it fitted well into the continuity of our old Marvel run. IDW agreed that there is precedent for this with the fact that GI Joe recently picked up on Larry Hama‘s old Marvel story threads. So. An idea took shape and we almost had it until the current economic siutation put the breaks on it.

“So where are we now? Well it is clear that IDW are not resistant to the idea but in these current times of relatively low comics sales they would need to feel confident that it would sell.

“So what can be done about it? If you are interested, sign the petition that is going about. Get enough names on that and it would clearly be a viable project. Of course it remains to be seen who would draw it as there are other interested parties but I think it is safe to say that Simon would love to get his teeth into it.”
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Re: Green Wake

Postby TheButcher on Sat Apr 16, 2011 6:42 pm

Murder, Mystery, Mayhem in Image's GREEN WAKE
You might have traveled all over the world, but you’ve never been to a town like Green Wake.

This sleepy town carries with it a haunted past and a foreboding quality that permeates the streets, the buildings and even its residents. If that wasn’t enough, it’s been the scene of a string of lurid homicides that draws in a man from outside. This man, Morley Mack, finds himself in the unlikely position of investigating the source of these deaths and all roads point to another new face to town – a woman named Ariel. Mack must find out the truth and Ariel’s involvement in these crimes, as well as how he came to end up in Green Wake to begin with.

This story is told in the upcoming five-issue series Green Wake from Image’s Shadowline imprint. It’s a new partnership between two Image creators – artist Riley Mossmo (Proof, Cowboy Ninja Viking) and Kurtis J. Wiebe (The Intrepids) -- whose discussions about the setting in this forgotten hamlet of Green Wake sprawled out to overtake the story and Mossmo’s signature art style. With the first issue of Green Wake on shelves now, we talked to the pair and got the five cent city tour.
User avatar
TheButcher
ZONE NEWS DIRECTOR
 
Posts: 17418
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2005 7:02 am
Location: The Bureau of Sabotage

Next

Return to Comic Books

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests