Treme

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Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:13 am

AP wrote:NEW YORK (AP) — David Simon has made the streets of Baltimore famous with gritty television dramas such as "The Wire," "Homicide: Life on the Street," and "The Corner." Now he wants to take on the Big Easy.

The next series he hopes to produce for HBO is about musicians reconstituting their lives in New Orleans, he told The New Yorker for its issue hitting newsstands Monday.

Simon, whose dramas are known for their authenticity and detail, has been spending time there researching the music scene.

"This show will be a way of making a visual argument that cities matter," Simon said. "'The Wire' has never done that. I certainly never said or wanted to say that Baltimore is not saving, or that it can't be saved. But I think some people watching the show think, Why don't they just move away?"

A goal of the show will be to celebrate the glories of an American city, and "why we need to accept ourselves as an urban people," Simon said.

"At the Macy's parade, when they show New York, they gotta get the dancers from Broadway shows out in the streets doing a kick line," he said. "In New Orleans the musicians are already in the streets."

The fifth and final season of HBO's "The Wire" begins in January, this time focusing on layoffs at The Sun — where Simon once worked — and how newspapers fail to capture certain complex truths. Previous seasons of the acclaimed drama have featured drug dealers, struggling longshoremen, city politicians and inner-city students.

The drama is actually about "the decline of the American empire" and the failure of postmodern institutions, Simon said. He is also working on an HBO miniseries called "Generation Kill," based on the 2004 book, about a Marine platoon in Iraq.


After The Corner and The Wire I will watch anything David Simon does.
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Postby colonel_lugz on Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:17 am

Could The Wire become the second best show on TV?
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Postby stereosforgeeks on Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:27 am

colonel_lugz wrote:Could The Wire become the second best show on TV?


first being?
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Postby colonel_lugz on Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:29 am

stereosforgeeks wrote:
colonel_lugz wrote:Could The Wire become the second best show on TV?


first being?


The Wire....was that not clear?
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Postby stereosforgeeks on Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:34 am

colonel_lugz wrote:
stereosforgeeks wrote:
colonel_lugz wrote:Could The Wire become the second best show on TV?


first being?


The Wire....was that not clear?


It's early I am not operating with all my faculties intact.

I was going to say Ive never seen a shwo better than The Wire.

This one's topic isn't as interesting to me, but I'm sure Simon will make it somethign special.
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Postby colonel_lugz on Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:37 am

If someone had tried to talk me into the wire just based on it's premise I probably wouldn't have been interested. I had to see it to fully understand what I was missing and boy am I glad I did.
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Postby stereosforgeeks on Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:38 am

colonel_lugz wrote:If someone had tried to talk me into the wire just based on it's premise I probably wouldn't have been interested. I had to see it to fully understand what I was missing and boy am I glad I did.


Valid point.
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Re: Treme

Postby Ribbons on Thu Jan 14, 2010 11:28 pm

Now w/ long-ass press release:

HBO wrote:For Immediate Release

NEW HBO DRAMA SERIES TREME, CREATED AND EXECUTIVE PRODUCED BY DAVID SIMON AND ERIC OVERMYER, TO DEBUT IN APRIL

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 14, 2010 – The one-hour drama series TREME will launch its ten-episode first season on HBO in April, it was announced today by Sue Naegle, president, HBO Entertainment. From David Simon (“The Wire,” “Generation Kill,” “The Corner”) and Eric Overmyer (“Homicide,” “The Wire”), the show follows musicians, chefs, Mardi Gras Indians and ordinary New Orleanians as they try to rebuild their lives, their homes and their unique culture in the aftermath of the 2005 hurricane and levee failure that caused the near-death of an American city.

“New Orleans is a city which lives in the imagination of the whole world,” says Overmyer. “We wanted to capture something authentic about it, as its people struggle with the after effects of the greatest calamity to befall an American city in the history of this country.”

Simon adds, “What happens in New Orleans matters. An ascendant society rebuilds its great cities.”

TREME begins in fall 2005, three months after Hurricane Katrina and the massive engineering failure in which flood control failed throughout New Orleans, flooding 80 percent of the city and displacing hundreds of thousands of residents. Fictional events depicted in the series will honor the actual chronology of political, economic and cultural events following the storm.

“As much as possible, we’re trying to show fealty to the post-Katrina history,” Overmyer notes. “New Orleanians have had their lives transformed by the storm and its aftermath, and we want to be careful in our presentation of that.”

Simon adds that viewers familiar with “The Wire,” the previous HBO drama on which he, Overmyer and fellow executive producer Nina Noble labored, should not expect a similar drama set in another city.

“In some fundamental ways,” he says, “TREME is centered on the ordinary lives of ordinary people. It is political only in the sense that ordinary people find themselves dealing with politics in their own lives. That said, New Orleanians – those who have been able to return, especially – are passionate about their city.”

The drama unfolds with Antoine Batiste, a smooth-talking trombonist who is struggling to make ends meet, earning cash with any gig he can get, including playing in funeral processions for his former neighbors. His ex-wife, LaDonna Batiste-Williams, owns a bar in the Central City neighborhood and splits her time between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, where her children and new husband have relocated. Concerned over the disappearance of her younger brother David, or Daymo, unseen since the storm, LaDonna has turned to a local civil rights attorney, the overburdened and underpaid Toni Bernette, for help. The government’s inconsistent and ineffectual response to the devastation has spurred Bernette’s husband Creighton, a university professor of English literature and an expert on local history, to become an increasingly outspoken critic of the institutional response.

Tremé resident Davis McAlary, a rebellious radio disc jockey, itinerant musician and general gadfly, is both chronicler of and participant in the city’s vibrant and varied musical culture, which simply refuses to be silent, even in the early months after the storm. His occasional partner, popular chef Janette Desautel, hopes to regain momentum for her small, newly re-opened neighborhood restaurant. Elsewhere in the city, displaced Mardi Gras Indian chief Albert Lambreaux returns to find his home destroyed and his tribe, the Guardians of the Flame, scattered, but Lambreaux is determined to rebuild. His son Delmond, an exile in New York playing modern jazz and looking beyond New Orleans for his future, is less sure of his native city’s future, while violinist Annie and her boyfriend Sonny, young street musicians living hand-to-mouth, seem wholly committed to the battered city.

As the story begins, more than half the population of New Orleans is elsewhere and much of the city is wrecked, muddied and caked in mold, while other neighborhoods remain viable. The tourists have yet to return, the money that follows them is scarce, and residents can take solace only in the fact that the city’s high levels of crime have migrated to Houston and Baton Rouge. And for those returning, housing is hard to come by, with many people waiting on insurance checks that may never arrive.

The ensemble cast of TREME includes Wendell Pierce (“The Wire,” HBO’s documentary “When the Levees Broke”) as Antoine Batiste; Khandi Alexander (“CSI: Miami,” HBO’s Emmy®-winning “The Corner”) as LaDonna Batiste-Williams; Clarke Peters (“Damages,” HBO’s “The Wire” and “The Corner”) as Albert Lambreaux; Rob Brown (“Stop-Loss,” “Finding Forrester”) as Delmond Lambreaux; Steve Zahn (“A Perfect Getaway,” “Sunshine Cleaning”) as Davis McAlary; Kim Dickens (HBO’s “Deadwood”) as Janette Desautel; Melissa Leo (“Homicide: Life on the Street”; Oscar® nominee for “Frozen River”) as Toni Bernette; John Goodman (“The Big Lebowski,” “O Brother, Where Art Thou?”) as Creighton Bernette; Michiel Huisman (“The Young Victoria”) as Sonny; and classical violinist Lucia Micarelli as Annie.

The series will also feature cameos by notable real-life New Orleanians, as well as the talents of many of its extraordinary musicians and other artists associated with the city’s music. Early episodes feature appearances by Allen Toussaint, Dr. John, Elvis Costello, Steve Earle, Kermit Ruffins, Donald Harrison Jr., Galactic, Trombone Shorty Andrews, Deacon John, and the Rebirth and Tremé Brass Bands.

“The disaster impacted people on every possible level – physically, emotionally, and spiritually,” says New Orleans native Wendell Pierce. “The only things people had to hang on to were the rich traditions we knew that survived the test of time before: our music, food and family, family that included anyone who decided to accept the challenge to return. We knew that America was, in the words of Martin Luther King, a ‘ten-day nation.’ We knew our plight wouldn't stay in the spotlight of the world long. But we are exercising our right of self-determination in the darkness with personal resolve. We are accessing the best of the human spirit and bringing light to this difficult time. That’s what TREME is about. We won't bow down.”

Longtime friends and collaborators since they both worked on the network drama “Homicide: Life on the Street,” Simon and Overmyer have wanted to make a series about New Orleans and its culture ever since they learned of each other’s affinity for the city. Overmyer has been a New Orleans resident for 20 years, while Simon has been a frequent visitor since the late 1980s.

“Neither one of us could figure out how to pitch it properly. The problem is that in order to convince anyone to let us depict New Orleans, you have to first explain it,” Simon says, adding, “And until Katrina, the only way to begin to explain it was to shoot the film.”

TREME is named for the Faubourg Tremé (an historic neighborhood just to the lakeside of the more celebrated French Quarter). Jazz itself was said to be born there, created by the slaves of Creole planters who were allowed to drum and chant on Sundays and market days in a public area that came to be known as Congo Square. It was in New Orleans that African rhythms and the pentatonic scale of flatted “blue” notes met European instrumentation and arrangements – a cross-cultural creation that transformed music on a worldwide scale.

The 80-minute pilot episode of TREME was directed by Agnieszka Holland (“The Wire,” “Cold Case”). Additional episodes are directed by Simon Cellan Jones (“Generation Kill”) as well as alumni of “The Wire,” including Jim McKay (HBO’s “In Treatment” and “Big Love”), Ernest Dickerson (“Burn Notice”), Anthony Hemingway (the upcoming film “Redtails”), Christine Moore (“CSI: NY”), Brad Anderson (“Fringe,” “The Machinist”) and Dan Attias (“Big Love,” “House”).

In addition to Simon and Overmyer, TREME is written by David Mills (HBO’s “The Corner” and “The Wire”) and George Pelecanos (“The Wire” and HBO’s upcoming miniseries “The Pacific”). Additional writers include New Orleans natives Lolis Elie (author and columnist for The New Orleans Times-Picayune) and Tom Piazza (author of the novel “City of Refuge” and “Why New Orleans Matters”).

Simon’s most recent HBO project, “Generation Kill,” debuted in July 2008. Based on the award-winning nonfiction book of the same name by journalist Evan Wright, it recounted the early weeks of the U.S. march into Iraq from the point of view of the officers and commanders who led the way to Baghdad. The New York Times called the miniseries “impeccable” and “searingly intense,” and USA Today praised it as “honest” and “painfully vivid.”

Finishing its five-season run in March 2008, “The Wire” examined a dystopic American city in which civic institutions and civic leadership could no longer recognize fundamental problems, much less address those problems. Daily Variety said of the Peabody Award-winning series, “When television history is written, little else will rival ‘The Wire’… extraordinary,” while San Francisco Chronicle hailed it as “a masterpiece” and Entertainment Weekly called the show “a staggering achievement.”

TREME was created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer; executive producers, David Simon, Nina K. Noble, Eric Overmyer, Carolyn Strauss; co-executive producer, David Mills; producer, Anthony Hemingway; directors, Agnieszka Holland, Jim McKay, Ernest Dickerson, Anthony Hemingway, Christine Moore, Brad Anderson, Simon Cellan Jones, Dan Attias; writers, David Simon, Eric Overmyer, David Mills, George Pelecanos, Lolis Elie, Tom Piazza.


The show begins in April
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Re: Treme

Postby magicmonkey on Fri Jan 15, 2010 1:39 am

Ribbons wrote:Now w/ long-ass press release:

HBO wrote:For Immediate Release

NEW HBO DRAMA SERIES TREME, CREATED AND EXECUTIVE PRODUCED BY DAVID SIMON AND ERIC OVERMYER, TO DEBUT IN APRIL

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 14, 2010 – The one-hour drama series TREME will launch its ten-episode first season on HBO in April, it was announced today by Sue Naegle, president, HBO Entertainment. From David Simon (“The Wire,” “Generation Kill,” “The Corner”) and Eric Overmyer (“Homicide,” “The Wire”), the show follows musicians, chefs, Mardi Gras Indians and ordinary New Orleanians as they try to rebuild their lives, their homes and their unique culture in the aftermath of the 2005 hurricane and levee failure that caused the near-death of an American city.

“New Orleans is a city which lives in the imagination of the whole world,” says Overmyer. “We wanted to capture something authentic about it, as its people struggle with the after effects of the greatest calamity to befall an American city in the history of this country.”

Simon adds, “What happens in New Orleans matters. An ascendant society rebuilds its great cities.”

TREME begins in fall 2005, three months after Hurricane Katrina and the massive engineering failure in which flood control failed throughout New Orleans, flooding 80 percent of the city and displacing hundreds of thousands of residents. Fictional events depicted in the series will honor the actual chronology of political, economic and cultural events following the storm.

“As much as possible, we’re trying to show fealty to the post-Katrina history,” Overmyer notes. “New Orleanians have had their lives transformed by the storm and its aftermath, and we want to be careful in our presentation of that.”

Simon adds that viewers familiar with “The Wire,” the previous HBO drama on which he, Overmyer and fellow executive producer Nina Noble labored, should not expect a similar drama set in another city.

“In some fundamental ways,” he says, “TREME is centered on the ordinary lives of ordinary people. It is political only in the sense that ordinary people find themselves dealing with politics in their own lives. That said, New Orleanians – those who have been able to return, especially – are passionate about their city.”

The drama unfolds with Antoine Batiste, a smooth-talking trombonist who is struggling to make ends meet, earning cash with any gig he can get, including playing in funeral processions for his former neighbors. His ex-wife, LaDonna Batiste-Williams, owns a bar in the Central City neighborhood and splits her time between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, where her children and new husband have relocated. Concerned over the disappearance of her younger brother David, or Daymo, unseen since the storm, LaDonna has turned to a local civil rights attorney, the overburdened and underpaid Toni Bernette, for help. The government’s inconsistent and ineffectual response to the devastation has spurred Bernette’s husband Creighton, a university professor of English literature and an expert on local history, to become an increasingly outspoken critic of the institutional response.

Tremé resident Davis McAlary, a rebellious radio disc jockey, itinerant musician and general gadfly, is both chronicler of and participant in the city’s vibrant and varied musical culture, which simply refuses to be silent, even in the early months after the storm. His occasional partner, popular chef Janette Desautel, hopes to regain momentum for her small, newly re-opened neighborhood restaurant. Elsewhere in the city, displaced Mardi Gras Indian chief Albert Lambreaux returns to find his home destroyed and his tribe, the Guardians of the Flame, scattered, but Lambreaux is determined to rebuild. His son Delmond, an exile in New York playing modern jazz and looking beyond New Orleans for his future, is less sure of his native city’s future, while violinist Annie and her boyfriend Sonny, young street musicians living hand-to-mouth, seem wholly committed to the battered city.

As the story begins, more than half the population of New Orleans is elsewhere and much of the city is wrecked, muddied and caked in mold, while other neighborhoods remain viable. The tourists have yet to return, the money that follows them is scarce, and residents can take solace only in the fact that the city’s high levels of crime have migrated to Houston and Baton Rouge. And for those returning, housing is hard to come by, with many people waiting on insurance checks that may never arrive.

The ensemble cast of TREME includes Wendell Pierce (“The Wire,” HBO’s documentary “When the Levees Broke”) as Antoine Batiste; Khandi Alexander (“CSI: Miami,” HBO’s Emmy®-winning “The Corner”) as LaDonna Batiste-Williams; Clarke Peters (“Damages,” HBO’s “The Wire” and “The Corner”) as Albert Lambreaux; Rob Brown (“Stop-Loss,” “Finding Forrester”) as Delmond Lambreaux; Steve Zahn (“A Perfect Getaway,” “Sunshine Cleaning”) as Davis McAlary; Kim Dickens (HBO’s “Deadwood”) as Janette Desautel; Melissa Leo (“Homicide: Life on the Street”; Oscar® nominee for “Frozen River”) as Toni Bernette; John Goodman (“The Big Lebowski,” “O Brother, Where Art Thou?”) as Creighton Bernette; Michiel Huisman (“The Young Victoria”) as Sonny; and classical violinist Lucia Micarelli as Annie.

The series will also feature cameos by notable real-life New Orleanians, as well as the talents of many of its extraordinary musicians and other artists associated with the city’s music. Early episodes feature appearances by Allen Toussaint, Dr. John, Elvis Costello, Steve Earle, Kermit Ruffins, Donald Harrison Jr., Galactic, Trombone Shorty Andrews, Deacon John, and the Rebirth and Tremé Brass Bands.

“The disaster impacted people on every possible level – physically, emotionally, and spiritually,” says New Orleans native Wendell Pierce. “The only things people had to hang on to were the rich traditions we knew that survived the test of time before: our music, food and family, family that included anyone who decided to accept the challenge to return. We knew that America was, in the words of Martin Luther King, a ‘ten-day nation.’ We knew our plight wouldn't stay in the spotlight of the world long. But we are exercising our right of self-determination in the darkness with personal resolve. We are accessing the best of the human spirit and bringing light to this difficult time. That’s what TREME is about. We won't bow down.”

Longtime friends and collaborators since they both worked on the network drama “Homicide: Life on the Street,” Simon and Overmyer have wanted to make a series about New Orleans and its culture ever since they learned of each other’s affinity for the city. Overmyer has been a New Orleans resident for 20 years, while Simon has been a frequent visitor since the late 1980s.

“Neither one of us could figure out how to pitch it properly. The problem is that in order to convince anyone to let us depict New Orleans, you have to first explain it,” Simon says, adding, “And until Katrina, the only way to begin to explain it was to shoot the film.”

TREME is named for the Faubourg Tremé (an historic neighborhood just to the lakeside of the more celebrated French Quarter). Jazz itself was said to be born there, created by the slaves of Creole planters who were allowed to drum and chant on Sundays and market days in a public area that came to be known as Congo Square. It was in New Orleans that African rhythms and the pentatonic scale of flatted “blue” notes met European instrumentation and arrangements – a cross-cultural creation that transformed music on a worldwide scale.

The 80-minute pilot episode of TREME was directed by Agnieszka Holland (“The Wire,” “Cold Case”). Additional episodes are directed by Simon Cellan Jones (“Generation Kill”) as well as alumni of “The Wire,” including Jim McKay (HBO’s “In Treatment” and “Big Love”), Ernest Dickerson (“Burn Notice”), Anthony Hemingway (the upcoming film “Redtails”), Christine Moore (“CSI: NY”), Brad Anderson (“Fringe,” “The Machinist”) and Dan Attias (“Big Love,” “House”).

In addition to Simon and Overmyer, TREME is written by David Mills (HBO’s “The Corner” and “The Wire”) and George Pelecanos (“The Wire” and HBO’s upcoming miniseries “The Pacific”). Additional writers include New Orleans natives Lolis Elie (author and columnist for The New Orleans Times-Picayune) and Tom Piazza (author of the novel “City of Refuge” and “Why New Orleans Matters”).

Simon’s most recent HBO project, “Generation Kill,” debuted in July 2008. Based on the award-winning nonfiction book of the same name by journalist Evan Wright, it recounted the early weeks of the U.S. march into Iraq from the point of view of the officers and commanders who led the way to Baghdad. The New York Times called the miniseries “impeccable” and “searingly intense,” and USA Today praised it as “honest” and “painfully vivid.”

Finishing its five-season run in March 2008, “The Wire” examined a dystopic American city in which civic institutions and civic leadership could no longer recognize fundamental problems, much less address those problems. Daily Variety said of the Peabody Award-winning series, “When television history is written, little else will rival ‘The Wire’… extraordinary,” while San Francisco Chronicle hailed it as “a masterpiece” and Entertainment Weekly called the show “a staggering achievement.”

TREME was created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer; executive producers, David Simon, Nina K. Noble, Eric Overmyer, Carolyn Strauss; co-executive producer, David Mills; producer, Anthony Hemingway; directors, Agnieszka Holland, Jim McKay, Ernest Dickerson, Anthony Hemingway, Christine Moore, Brad Anderson, Simon Cellan Jones, Dan Attias; writers, David Simon, Eric Overmyer, David Mills, George Pelecanos, Lolis Elie, Tom Piazza.


The show begins in April


Now w/ long ass quote box of said press release. Will be looking out for this. I like the bit about civic institutions and civic leadership being unable to recognise fundamental problems - sooooooooooo true.
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Re: Treme

Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Jan 15, 2010 1:48 am

Fuck.

I don't know what to do, here. See...this doesn't sound interesting to me at all. BUT, Homicide was one of the better TV shows ever made. And because of that, I didn't originally give The Wire a shot. I figured, "Well, it can't be like Homicide!" And I was kinda right. It wasn't. It was BETTER. Now, I'm thinking, "Treme doesn't sound appealing, plus it can't top Homicide or The Wire."

Am I going to get burned again, by missing out on a fantastic show at the beginning?

Fuck.

edit: crap, it has Melissa Leo and Bunk Moreland in it? Fuck you, David Simon, I have to tivo this up now.
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Re: Treme

Postby Leckomaniac on Fri Jan 15, 2010 9:43 am

Yes, yes, yes! Gimme, gimme, gimme!
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Fri Jan 15, 2010 10:42 am

thomasgaffney wrote:Fuck.

I don't know what to do, here. See...this doesn't sound interesting to me at all. BUT, Homicide was one of the better TV shows ever made. And because of that, I didn't originally give The Wire a shot. I figured, "Well, it can't be like Homicide!" And I was kinda right. It wasn't. It was BETTER. Now, I'm thinking, "Treme doesn't sound appealing, plus it can't top Homicide or The Wire."

Am I going to get burned again, by missing out on a fantastic show at the beginning?

Fuck.

edit: crap, it has Melissa Leo and Bunk Moreland in it? Fuck you, David Simon, I have to tivo this up now.


It really doesnt sound all that interesting but it's David Simon so I will be waiting in anticipation.
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Re: Treme

Postby Leckomaniac on Fri Jan 15, 2010 10:48 am

I must be crazy because I think it sounds extremely interesting. The setting, characters, creative talent, network, etc. make this seem quite compelling.

Can't wait!
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:27 am

Leckomaniac wrote:I must be crazy because I think it sounds extremely interesting. The setting, characters, creative talent, network, etc. make this seem quite compelling.

Can't wait!


All of that does sound compelling it's more the question of "story." It lacks a distinct dramatic hook. That's not saying Simon won't create a great story with it, but at this point i feel like that's the one thing missing.

It's probably just hard to explain in terms of a generic narrative arc.
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Re: Treme

Postby Leckomaniac on Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:52 am

stereosforgeeks wrote:
Leckomaniac wrote:I must be crazy because I think it sounds extremely interesting. The setting, characters, creative talent, network, etc. make this seem quite compelling.

Can't wait!


All of that does sound compelling it's more the question of "story." It lacks a distinct dramatic hook. That's not saying Simon won't create a great story with it, but at this point i feel like that's the one thing missing.

It's probably just hard to explain in terms of a generic narrative arc.


I think that is a good thing. I find "hooks" to be a burden to television shows. Look at HEROES. That show crumbled under the weight of it's "hook".

I find it comforting that this show is just going to be straightforward drama featuring a sterling creative team and a vibrant locale. THAT is, one might say, the "hook".
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Fri Jan 15, 2010 12:22 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:
stereosforgeeks wrote:
Leckomaniac wrote:I must be crazy because I think it sounds extremely interesting. The setting, characters, creative talent, network, etc. make this seem quite compelling.

Can't wait!


All of that does sound compelling it's more the question of "story." It lacks a distinct dramatic hook. That's not saying Simon won't create a great story with it, but at this point i feel like that's the one thing missing.

It's probably just hard to explain in terms of a generic narrative arc.


I think that is a good thing. I find "hooks" to be a burden to television shows. Look at HEROES. That show crumbled under the weight of it's "hook".

I find it comforting that this show is just going to be straightforward drama featuring a sterling creative team and a vibrant locale. THAT is, one might say, the "hook".


Heroes crumbled because of terrible writers and a creator without a clear plan. David Simon I'm sure has a clear plan for his drama. I just wish he would let more people in on it.

I am really excited about the show. Between this, Boardwalk Empire, and Game of Thrones I am really excited in the direction HBO is going. Hopefully the new shoes will find an audience.

Now if HBO would only get their cronenberg project off the ground! Maybe that one is dead?
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Re: Treme

Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Jan 15, 2010 4:04 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:I must be crazy because I think it sounds extremely interesting.


My life is pretty shitty and depressing right now, so do I really want to watch a show where ALL the characters are fucked and get even more depressed? No.

But David Simon and the actors assembled so far DO kick ass...
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Re: Treme

Postby so sorry on Fri Jan 15, 2010 4:09 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:I must be crazy because I think it sounds extremely interesting. The setting, characters, creative talent, network, etc. make this seem quite compelling.

Can't wait!


Don't you mean 'tremely interesting?
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Re: Treme

Postby Leckomaniac on Fri Jan 15, 2010 4:22 pm

thomasgaffney wrote:
Leckomaniac wrote:I must be crazy because I think it sounds extremely interesting.


My life is pretty shitty and depressing right now, so do I really want to watch a show where ALL the characters are fucked and get even more depressed? No.

But David Simon and the actors assembled so far DO kick ass...


Um, ok?

That sounds like a personal problem and not really a valid criticism against the show? Unless you expect every show to be uplifting in order to accommodate your fluctuating mood?

Good thing you weren't depressed when THE WIRE was airing...otherwise you may have missed out for fear of becoming MORE depressed.

And besides, from that press release it seems to me that the overall posture of the show is about the determination of spirit that is present within New Orleans (and it's residents). Not sure where I have no doubt that the series will have some heartbreaking moments, but ultimately the show appears to be mainly about overcoming...persevering, etc.

I don't know, but that sounds cool to me.
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Re: Treme

Postby thomasgaffney on Fri Jan 15, 2010 4:29 pm

Leckomaniac wrote:That sounds like a personal problem and not really a valid criticism against the show?


I never said I was criticizing the show, I just said I didn't find interesting. And in the interest of information, I was stating that it had nothing to do with the creative talent behind the show (which I love), or the acting talent in front of the cameras (which I love), it has to do with the premise of the show and the situation the story is set in.

Hence, my conundrum as to whether or not to give it a shot right away, or wait for season 1 to his DVD and netflix it...
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Re: Treme

Postby Hermanator X on Sat Mar 13, 2010 9:26 am

thomasgaffney wrote:
Leckomaniac wrote:That sounds like a personal problem and not really a valid criticism against the show?


I never said I was criticizing the show, I just said I didn't find interesting. And in the interest of information, I was stating that it had nothing to do with the creative talent behind the show (which I love), or the acting talent in front of the cameras (which I love), it has to do with the premise of the show and the situation the story is set in.

Hence, my conundrum as to whether or not to give it a shot right away, or wait for season 1 to his DVD and netflix it...



Heres a trailer to help you decide.



Im in. Looks interesting.
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Sat Mar 13, 2010 9:43 am

Thats a really good trailer. Gives you a great feel for the show without giving well anything away.
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Re: Treme

Postby Fievel on Sat Mar 13, 2010 2:50 pm

I 100% agreed with Gaffney's earlier statement. The basic premise of this show does NOT interest me in the slightest.
Having said that, the trailer did indeed catch my attention.

The first 10 seconds made me think it was going to be Resident Evil 5: The Series.
Some of The Wire regulars were a welcome sight.
Kim Dickens (Deadwood) is always nice to see.
Steve Zahn? Interesting.
Khandi Alexander (CSI Miami)... forgot she was on Simon's very good mini series The Corner. Also forgot she was a News Radio regular.
John Goodman!!!!

I am now interested.
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Re: Treme

Postby Maui on Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:55 am

I saw this trailer before The Pacific the other night. I think it looks fantastic. I'll definitely be tuning into this.
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Re: Treme

Postby Leckomaniac on Wed Mar 31, 2010 12:05 pm

David Mills, Co-Writer and Co-exec for 'Treme has died

He was a writer for The Wire, and many other shows.

Bummer.
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Re: Treme

Postby Ribbons on Sun Apr 11, 2010 3:25 am

A heads-up to some of you David Simon fans overseas, this show debuts tonight!

Here's a preview for anyone else who hasn't made up their mind yet:

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Re: Treme

Postby Seppuku on Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:42 am

Not 100% on the subject matter, but it was very cool seeing a few cameos from New Orleans musicians in there, particularly Allen Toussaint and Dr John. I'll be checking this out. And that frame of John Goodman is not flattering! :shock:
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Re: Treme

Postby travis-dane on Sun Apr 11, 2010 10:07 am

Man, I miss The Wire.
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Re: Treme

Postby Pacino86845 on Sun Apr 11, 2010 11:22 am

Herc has seen the first three episodes of Treme, and so have other reviewers, most likely.

In a nutshell, he's saying that it's tough to figure out just how good the show will be, as was the case with prior Simon projects because they tend to build up slowly.

Herc wrote:Is it as good as “The Wire”? Three episodes in, I had no idea how good “The Wire” was (it turned out to be really REALLY good), so it’s hard to judge, but there’s no chance I’ll be moving on before HBO cablecasts the 10th episode that concludes “Treme’s” first season.

The series fascinates at times with details of time and place, from the helmeted national guardsmen who shadow the city to the mud on the floors and the mold on the walls. Disaster has even apparently driven most of the criminal element out west to Houston. What becomes of a major metropolis after it spends weeks as part of the Atlantic Ocean? My inner survivalist loves to learn how we cope with catastrophe, and I’d be lying if I said this series doesn’t beckon to that part of me.

And I think I already like “Treme” better than Simon’s last series, “Generation Kill.” I can also speculate that if you’re a jazz fan you’ll enjoy this series more than a not-jazz-fan, as it features stretches in which little happens beyond men blowing hard into horns. The project should also sell quite a few albums for real-life recording artist Kermit Ruffins, who performs and plays himself in a pivotal supporting role.

(More a callow punk/alternative maven myself, I’m excited to discover that Elvis Costello is a major presence in the series, having come to the city to record a new album with legendary songwriter-musician and Louisiana native Allen Toussaint. I note that Costello and Toussaint did indeed record the Grammy-nominated album “The River in Reverse” there between Nov. 27 and Dec. 10, 2005.)
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Sun Apr 11, 2010 11:55 pm

I really liked it. Simons attention to detail is in full force. Ive never been to New Orleans but he makes you feel like you are there.

One of the major things that struck me is how much the show made me smile. All the little dialog quips, the music, and just the general sense while things may be f*d up we are at least working to make them better.

The cast is huge and the only person that didnt feel authentically human was Zahns DJ. I thought the character was humorous but felt a tad cliche at this point. Im sure as the series goes on he will become much more complex and "lived in."

Anyway I am definitely happy with the results so far and am interested in how these story lines will slowly progress.
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Re: Treme

Postby Maui on Mon Apr 12, 2010 10:39 am

stereosforgeeks wrote:One of the major things that struck me is how much the show made me smile. All the little dialog quips, the music, and just the general sense while things may be f*d up we are at least working to make them better.


Loved the part when Davis (after meeting Evlis Costello) says to Kermit : "You’re just standing there telling me that all you want to do is get high, play some trumpet, and barbecue in New Orleans your whole damned life?”

and Kermit simply replies: “That’ll work.”

I really enjoyed the show too. You do really get a sense that these people will prevail with the help of family, music and bbq. The jazz music is beyond incredible. I did read that Zahn will be showcasing his musical abilities on the show, perhaps this will help his case as I found his character a tad annoying.

Great pilot.
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Re: Treme

Postby RaulMonkey on Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:09 pm

WIN. ...as if there were any doubt.

I think it will take me a little while to get used to John Goodman as a character in this world because it's unusual for David Simon to use such a recognizable star. But with Simon's track record, I trust that Dan Conner and Walter Sobchak will be the farthest people from my mind by the third or fourth episode.
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Re: Treme

Postby Fried Gold on Tue Apr 13, 2010 6:23 pm

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Re: Treme

Postby Seppuku on Tue Apr 13, 2010 6:39 pm

Ver' cool news (that's me typing in my southern accent). I'm gonna wait until this comes out on DVD. David Simon's shows are best experienced all at once like an extra-long movie. Going from the fast pace of everything else out there straight into the slow flow of New Orleans wouldn't wash with me. That's a city you've gotta immerse yourself in until all of a sudden you get locked into its groove. Once a week would water down the effect. I'm glad you guys dug the first ep, though.
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Re: Treme

Postby papalazeru on Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:06 am

Jazz, the music of hope for a once oppressed race.

Damn the show meanders! It's slow, very slow, like the funeral song at the end. It's not a bad thing at all, I wish more shows cared enough to treasure the time developing characters.

Just as openly as Jazz plays a big part of the show, so does hope and it really delivers. I really felt that we'd been throw into these characters lives just after the grieving process and are now trying to pick up the pieces. Some are still grieving, some continue as before and others seemed quite self centered.

If you aren't used to the style in which the Wire was directed with overly long sequences (which aren't actually overly long, just not as fast as most modern shows) and a realistic pacing in the dialogue, then I'd suggest you watch the Wire first to understand.

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Maui wrote:Loved the part when Davis (after meeting Evlis Costello) says to Kermit : "You’re just standing there telling me that all you want to do is get high, play some trumpet, and barbecue in New Orleans your whole damned life?”

and Kermit simply replies: “That’ll work.”


That sums up the lifestyle of quite a few of the people we met (and it felt like a meeting) in the show and I'm sure it will crop up again.

I've never been to New Orleans or know what it was like on ground level for people post Katrina but after seeing Simon's previous works and reading how close to life it's like, I have no doubt that if I was there - it would probably be exactly as shown.
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Re: Treme

Postby Fried Gold on Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:57 am

Considering I'm not a massive fan of jazz, it didn't bother me at all in this. Perhaps because it's not that kind of jazz...the kind where the members of a band clearly aren't all playing the same piece of music.


I wasn't overly convinced by Steve Zahn though. He didn't quite seem to fit in with the rest of the programme. Maybe he'll grown into it.
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Wed Apr 14, 2010 12:13 pm

Fried Gold wrote:Considering I'm not a massive fan of jazz, it didn't bother me at all in this. Perhaps because it's not that kind of jazz...the kind where the members of a band clearly aren't all playing the same piece of music.


I wasn't overly convinced by Steve Zahn though. He didn't quite seem to fit in with the rest of the programme. Maybe he'll grown into it.


Its because it's his typical stoner sidekicky shtick. He does have some good range though (Rescue Dawn). Hopefully that comes out sooner than later.
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Re: Treme

Postby Maui on Mon Apr 19, 2010 11:49 am

Coco Robicheaux sings soulfully then splatters chicken blood. Goodman's speech on 1st year university students having only read H@rry Fucking Potter cracked me up. Easily my favourite character is Chief Lambreaux (played by Clarke Peters), only 2 episodes into Treme and he delivers such powerful performances. Alot of story lines opened up in last night's episode AND I even found Zahn's character endearing.

Lastly, Lucia Micarelli on the violin. Brilliant.
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Mon Apr 19, 2010 12:03 pm

Maui wrote:Coco Robicheaux sings soulfully then splatters chicken blood. Goodman's speech on 1st year university students having only read H@rry Fucking Potter cracked me up. Easily my favourite character is Chief Lambreaux (played by Clarke Peters), only 2 episodes into Treme and he delivers such powerful performances. Alot of story lines opened up in last night's episode AND I even found Zahn's character endearing.

Lastly, Lucia Micarelli on the violin. Brilliant.


That was quite a performance of Saints was it not?

I loved goodmans speech about engineering depts! He is basically the voice of the audience at this point.

The characters are definitely deepening quite nicely.
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Re: Treme

Postby Maui on Mon Apr 19, 2010 12:22 pm

stereosforgeeks wrote:I loved goodmans speech about engineering depts! He is basically the voice of the audience at this point.


Yeah, he was doing much of the same at the very beginning of the Pilot episode during his interview with the British news team.
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Mon Apr 19, 2010 12:30 pm

One thing I am having a little bit of a problem with is Simon talking directly to the audience. In Generation Kill and The Wire he let his situations do the talking for him and so fare in Treme hes been talking at us. "You probably didnt even know what the 9th ward was until the storm" etc... I wish he would be a bit more organic.
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Re: Treme

Postby John-Locke on Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:13 pm

Did Freemon kill that kid?

Funny to see Slim Charles at the end there.

I'm diggin' Bunks character the most at the moment.

It's going to take me a while to remember all these characters names.

Anyone know what I might recognise the soft spoken Creole Chef Jacque from? It's been really bugging me and he's not listed on IMDB (which is the only reason I remember his name, I listened out for it so I could do a search).

It goes without saying that this show is a keeper.
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Re: Treme

Postby Maui on Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:22 am

John-Locke wrote:Did Freemon kill that kid?


It certainly gave that impression but I think the kid will live to see the next day.

John-Locke wrote:Anyone know what I might recognise the soft spoken Creole Chef Jacque from? It's been really bugging me and he's not listed on IMDB (which is the only reason I remember his name, I listened out for it so I could do a search).


The actor's name is Ntare Mwine. He's done alot of TV judging by his IMDB listing.
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Re: Treme

Postby Peven on Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:30 am

HBOless as i am, the dvd's for this will be going up on my netflix queue
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Re: Treme

Postby John-Locke on Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:33 am

Maui wrote:
John-Locke wrote:Anyone know what I might recognise the soft spoken Creole Chef Jacque from? It's been really bugging me and he's not listed on IMDB (which is the only reason I remember his name, I listened out for it so I could do a search).


The actor's name is Ntare Mwine. He's done alot of TV judging by his IMDB listing.


I recognised him from Heroes

:oops:


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Re: Treme

Postby Fried Gold on Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:17 pm

stereosforgeeks wrote:One thing I am having a little bit of a problem with is Simon talking directly to the audience. In Generation Kill and The Wire he let his situations do the talking for him and so fare in Treme hes been talking at us. "You probably didnt even know what the 9th ward was until the storm" etc... I wish he would be a bit more organic.

Yeah, I get that too.

The Wire & Generation Kill didn't spell quite so much out so early on - I actually had to go read up on some of the things that were happening some of the time.

I think people actually are quite aware of the problems New Orleans faced (and still face) after the hurricane (it was covered here in quite a lot of detail anyway) so it's odd that you'd have those upfront pieces of exposition. I guess it's based on real life happenings though.
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Re: Treme

Postby Fievel on Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:25 pm

Just watched the first two and I'm loving it.
I don't think I've found my self physically grooving along with a TV show like I have with this.
This is not a show I should be watching while trying to get my 7 month old daughter to sleep (she kept waking up). :oops:

The music? Awesome. But then I'm a big fan of funk and to see one of my favorite bands (Galactic*) on the second episode? :shock:
And then to see the same band smoking weed on a set break? :shock: 8-)

They are doing a great job of slowly introducing us to the characters while giving us just enough action to keep it interesting. And every character arc so far has enough intrigue to keep me wanting more.

* Seriously if you like a little funk in yo trunk check these guys out. I've seen them in a bar smaller than the one they were in on Treme and have seen them in very large venues as well. Always a great live show from these guys. Their name again.... Galactic.
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Re: Treme

Postby Fievel on Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:49 am

So the stuff with Chief and the whole Indian thing... I have no idea what I'm watching there, but it's really interesting to watch. Not to mention that during their memorial thing they were kickin' out some sweet grooves... until the tour bus with the Glen Beck lookalike came by.
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Re: Treme

Postby stereosforgeeks on Mon Apr 26, 2010 9:21 am

Simon again rails on the outsiders in the final scene. It isnt prticularly fair to the outsiders because they arent written as more than cliches and they arent really given any sort of way to respond. The outsiders have good intentions and the show needs to recognize this fact.

Scott Tobias of the AV Club wrote:"Last thing’s first: In an otherwise stellar episode, the final scene of tonight’s Treme, where a busload of tourists intrudes on a ritual to honor one of Katrina’s tragically neglected, sticks in my craw a bit. Arriving right on the heels of last week’s subplot about the freshly scrubbed, out-of-place Wisconsinites and their odyssey through “real New Orleans,” I’m worried the show has gone beyond merely reflecting the prickly attitudes of some NOLA natives and adopted them itself. That’s not to say those attitudes are unfounded: The intrusion of photo-snapping tourists on a scene of that gravity borders on the obscene—something the driver eventually acknowledges—and the neglect shown to the city before and after Katrina was something worse. And, of course, there are negative consequences to having outsiders descend on the city that Treme does address, must address, and addresses with a lot of insight.

At the same time, I think the show could stand to be a bit more charitable to outsiders. It’s a natural impulse for people to bear witness to tragedy. It’s also natural for them to show compassion and help where they can, even if they cannot begin to fathom what makes this great and ornery city tick. (And perhaps unwittingly piss off the locals as a result.) Great as David Simon’s series have all been, Treme underlines his weakness for painting those outside the show’s generously considered inner circle with too broad and too contemptuous a brush. And make no mistake: As viewers, we’re very much on the outside here. There are times when I worry I’m simply not cool enough to hang out with Treme. It gets mad when I neglect it, but it isn’t happy with my interest, either. Because no matter how hard you try, you’re never gonna be New Orleans enough for it. (The New Yorker’s Nancy Franklin puts it more succinctly: “The series virtually prohibits you from loving it, while asking you to value it.”)"


Other than that I loved the episode. Antoines impromptu singing with annie and i forget his name was awesome in particular.
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Re: Treme

Postby Fievel on Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:20 am

Fuck that.
Taking a way for a moment that those people were having a memorial for their friend whose body had just been found in a horrid state of decay. That's their neighborhood. Those are their homes. And here comes a tour bus designed to go through the very same neighborhood so that people can sightsee and take pictures. They responded with their cameras. They responded by (likely) paying money to bear witness to these families' loss. Now if they were only going through the business district? Different story. But to have a tour bus pass through neighborhoods is sick.
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