Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

All the dirt. All the top secret stuff. Anything that has to do with the process of getting us to sit and watch something projected on the big screen.

Re: Summer School

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 02, 2012 7:54 pm

From THR:
Adam Sandler's Happy Madison to Produce 'Summer School' Remake (Heat Vision Exclusive)
Borys Kit wrote:Paramount has been trying to revisit the 1980s comedy since 2005, but the project has been stuck in development detention.

Happy Madison, the production banner run by Adam Sandler and Jack Giaraputo, is in negotiations to come aboard to produce Paramount’s planned remake of Summer School.

School was a light 1987 comedy directed by Carl Reiner that starred Mark Harmon as a gym teacher forced to cancel his summer plans and teach an English class filled with oddballs and rebels. The film also featured a young Courtney Thorne-Smith.

Paramount has been trying to remake the film since 2005, but the project has been stuck in development detention. Jordan Kerner, the producer behind The Smurfs and Charlotte’s Web, initially was backing a version that would have made the teacher hard-nosed (as opposed to Harmon's laid-back character) and squaring off against one mischievous student.

Another incarnation, this one around 2010, involved Star Trek writer-producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci.

By bringing aboard Sandler and Giaraputo, the studio is signaling that it hopes to bring a more comedic focus to the project. Sandler is not attached to star in the project, which soon will hire writers.
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Re: “Die Hard in a…”

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 02, 2012 10:48 pm

From Deadline:
Roland Emmerich in Talks to Helm $3 Million Sony Spec ‘White House Down’
MIKE FLEMING wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
Roland Emmerich is in talks to next direct White House Down, the James Vanderbilt-scripted action drama. Sony Pictures paid $3 million when Vanderbilt and his Mythology Entertainment partners brought the spec script to market last week. The film focuses on a paramilitary takeover of the White House and was compared to Die Hard when it fetched the highest sum for a spec script so far this year for Vanderbilt, who scripted The Amazing Spider-Man for Sony and is working on the sequel to the Marc Webb-directed 3D film that stars Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone.

Emmerich and his producing partner Harald Kloser will join Mythology Entertainment partners Bradley Fischer, Vanderbilt, and Laeta Kalogridis to produce the film. It will be his next project as director, and production is slated to begin in the fall. Emmerich will follow White House Down with Singularity, which remains a priority project at Columbia Pictures. Kloser is also a producer of Singularity. Vanderbilt’s script work includes Zodiac, he’s adapting Red Riding for Steve Zaillian’s Film Rites and Ridley Scott, and is doing a production rewrite on Robocop. Emmerich is repped by CAA.
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Re: “Die Hard in a…”

Postby Fievel on Tue Apr 03, 2012 1:10 am

TheButcher wrote:From Deadline:
Roland Emmerich in Talks to Helm $3 Million Sony Spec ‘White House Down’
MIKE FLEMING wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
Roland Emmerich is in talks to next direct White House Down, the James Vanderbilt-scripted action drama. Sony Pictures paid $3 million when Vanderbilt and his Mythology Entertainment partners brought the spec script to market last week. The film focuses on a paramilitary takeover of the White House and was compared to Die Hard when it fetched the highest sum for a spec script so far this year for Vanderbilt, who scripted The Amazing Spider-Man for Sony and is working on the sequel to the Marc Webb-directed 3D film that stars Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone.

Emmerich and his producing partner Harald Kloser will join Mythology Entertainment partners Bradley Fischer, Vanderbilt, and Laeta Kalogridis to produce the film. It will be his next project as director, and production is slated to begin in the fall. Emmerich will follow White House Down with Singularity, which remains a priority project at Columbia Pictures. Kloser is also a producer of Singularity. Vanderbilt’s script work includes Zodiac, he’s adapting Red Riding for Steve Zaillian’s Film Rites and Ridley Scott, and is doing a production rewrite on Robocop. Emmerich is repped by CAA.


Story made me think of Orson Scott Card's book Empire.
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Re: Beetlejuice 2

Postby TheButcher on Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:49 am

Seth Grahame-Smith Touts New Novel 'Unholy Night,' Discusses Movie Schedule and Collaborating With Tim Burton (Q&A)
Andy Lewis wrote:THR: Where does Beetlejuice fit in your schedule?

SGS:The Beetlejuice sequel will come after Unholy Night in my schedule. The first opportunity to tackle that will probably be later this year.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Sun Apr 15, 2012 11:21 pm

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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:47 pm

2012 pic menu more like an '80s stew - Hollywood opts to imitate rather than innovate
Peter Bart wrote:Bill Castle was a colorful producer of a previous generation who had a simple philosophy about filmgoers. "Keep surprising 'em," he used to tell me. "Give 'em something they've never seen before."

Castle would himself be surprised were he around today (he died in 1977 having produced scores of films, including "Rosemary's Baby"). That's because today's tentpoles are usually geared to deliver filmgoers something they've indeed seen before and hopefully will want to see again. Filmmakers of Castle's era were expected to deliver "surprise," but their successors are obliged to summon up the familiar.

The upshot, of course, is an abundance of sequels and prequels and, most recently, remakes from the '80s. The closest thing to a game-changing new movie like "Titanic" is the 3D re-release of "Titanic," which is finding a receptive audience even at 3 hours and 14 minutes of running time.

And now we have "The Avengers," which will be honored April 28 with an extravaganza closing the Tribeca Film Festival -- a new movie with an old cast. Its agglomeration of superheroes -- Iron Man, Thor, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Captain America and the Incredible Hulk -- don't usually touch down at film festivals; tentpoles need tweets and viral buzz, not the nods of cineastes -- but Tribeca decided that its audience, too, would enjoy a glimpse of the familiar.

The box office success of "21 Jump Street" will doubtless spur a recycling of '80s movies and TV shows -- today's Hollywood decisionmakers came of age with this material. Already coming up soon are a new "Dirty Dancing" and the return of "RoboCop" and even a new installment in the "Die Hard" series. This means new careers for Sylvester Stallone, Bruce Willis, Arnold Schwarzenegger. Even Billy Crystal will be a leading man again.

It's a paradox that studios today are working so hard to recapture the familiar, because that's exactly what their predecessors of the '70s were rebelling against. Hollywood back then had lost its "habit audience," and a new generation of filmgoers was embracing films like "Easy Rider," "Midnight Cowboy" and "Bonnie & Clyde." While today's tentpoles desperately seek instantaneous awareness, movies of that era opened in a limited number of markets and slowly built their own awareness. Their impact changed the pop culture of the moment.

I think if Bill Castle were around today, he would take heart in the remarkable success of "The Hunger Games." Even though it was pre-ordained to be a tentpole and opened amid a global explosion of publicity, the movie offered a fresh cast of characters and considerable shock value.

It's always amazing what happens when new ideas are introduced, not old ones recycled.

Heady numbers, indeed

I'm beginning to think that numbers are the new narcotic.

Staring at them leaves me disoriented, if not downright giddy.

Facebook tosses $1 billion at photo startup Instagram. The Dodgers sell for $2 billion. The new boss of Apple frets publicly that he's got $100 billion in cash on his balance sheet and isn't quite sure how to dispose of it.

The mavens responsible for dealing with these numbers dwell in an equally disorienting universe. Hedge funds had a lousy year in 2011 but a manager like Steven A. Cohen paid himself $585 million while John A. Paulson had to settle for $500 million in take-home pay.

Corporate CEOs had reasons for envy. In the entertainment world, Philippe Dauman of Viacom received $43.1 million in compensation and Disney's Bob Iger $31.4 million, leaving Rupert Murdoch in third place with $29.4 million (OK, Rupe arguably earned his pay last year).

Why is all this disorienting? Possibly because most people live in a parallel universe where budgets are still being cut, temps are being hired instead of fulltime workers and gasoline prices are putting a crimp in home budgets.

Besides, I tried Instagram. I think it's a sappy app.
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Re: From Dusk Till Dawn...

Postby TheButcher on Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:43 am

Elgin James Resumes Movie Career With Deal To Direct Indie Thriller ‘Come Sundown’
EXCLUSIVE: Elgin James has been set to direct Come Sundown, a drama scripted by Justin Marks that will shoot in the fall. Jamie Patricof and Lynette Howell of Electric City Entertainment are producing the thriller about a family taken hostage by desperate fugitives determined to get across the border. It becomes a struggle between a father trying to protect his family while hanging onto his humanity, and a hardened criminal with nothing to lose.

It will be the first project for James after spending almost a year in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Detention Center (he spent eight months behind bars, and another three in a halfway house). If you recall, James grew up on the rough streets around Boston and after getting thumped plenty, helped form the rough street gang FSU that battled skinheads and other ethnic gangs, and robbed drug dealers for money and gave half the proceeds to charity. James came to Hollywood with a film deal to tell his story, but after he made a vow to his girlfriend (now his wife) that he would swear off violence and embrace pacifism, he blew off that deal because he was embarrassed by his past actions and knew they would be glamorized in a Robin Hood-like story. Instead, he wrote the script Little Birds, found an advocate in Blue Valentine producer Patricof, and then got accepted into the Sundance Labs program. He made his directing debut on Little Birds, which made the 2011 Sundance Festival (and subsequently got acquired by Millennium Entertainment). He found an agent at WME, and got his first studio job writing Low Riders for Imagine.

Then, just like that, his violent past reared back to bite him. A Chicago judge ordered James to spend a year in jail for attempted extortion. I met James at Sundance on the day Little Birds premiered, as he awaited the judge’s decision. At the time, it struck me that while so many filmmakers in Park City made gritty films that depicted violence they could only imagine, James had lived plenty of that and went out of his way to de-glamorize the violence in his own film.

I spoke with James today, and he confirms that doing time is at least as bad as you might think. “I’d call it the crappiest writing sabbatical ever,” he joked. It was worse than that. “Because it was an administrative facility and high security, I never stepped outside,” he said. “No fresh air, no sunlight for eight months. I tried to use the time positively, with the idea that since I was losing a year just when things started happening, I could figure out my strengths and weaknesses as a filmmaker. I also set a goal to read 100 books, and I read 101.”

James exposed himself to classics like Gone With the Wind, and the fiction of writers like Pat Conroy. His big challenge was not slipping back into a pattern of settling disputes with violence, and keeping to the vow of pacifism that he feels has turned his life around. “It was one thing to embrace non-violence when you’re living in Silverlake, sipping smoothies with Kate Bosworth and Juno Temple, and meeting with all the intelligent beautiful people who inspired me. It’s another thing when you’re thrown into the darkest, most violent place, the general population of the U.S. Federal prison system. Every day I was challenged, especially at the beginning because some people knew who I was, and they knew about my past. I learned that like being an alcoholic, rage does not just go away because you say you won’t act on it. Every day was like the first day of school, times 1000. Not to sound arrogant, but fear of the unknown goes away quickly, and the bigger issue is handling anger. Here I had spent years fighting against drug dealers, bullies and racists and I was surrounded by them. And I was the only guilty person in prison. Everybody else was fighting their case, while I’d said, yes, I did it. I owned up to it, and was serving my time.”

James won his personal battle with rage, walking away from confrontation and surrounded himself with seasoned cons who had seen enough trouble not to look for more. He would make acquaintances with men who seemed nice enough, only to discover they were there because they’d done ghastly things. And he had to stop himself from getting defensive when former Boston kingpin Whitey Bulger took residence in protective custody. To his fellow inmates, Bulger was a rat. While James was growing up on the rough streets around Boston, Bulger was the man.

It was during that struggle that Patricof sent him Come Sundown. The script had been titled Borderline when Rod Lurie was going to direct it. In prison, James was precluded from writing scripts–he has turned in Low Riders, but if he did any scribbling behind bars, he wasn’t telling me–but he read everything sent to him and found a kinship to the protagonist’s dilemma.

“There is this clash of the lower self against the higher self,” James said. “The kidnapped man is a doctor who is a pacifist, and he has to decide whether to put ideals and principles above protecting his family against the ex-con who personified the lower self. I wouldn’t have thought of doing the project beforehand, it was just a violent action thriller when I first read it. But the idea of exploring where that line should be drawn, when the doctor’s insistence on being a pacifist becomes an excuse for cowardice or self-righteousness at the expense of his family, that intrigued me.”

James recalled seeing footage of himself just before he entered the Sundance Labs, the brashness and rage still in him before the Labs humbled him and changed his life, he said. “Once I had a positive light coming out of myself, I didn’t recognize the old me. I thought, what a fucking asshole I was.” That adherence to pacifism kept him out of trouble in prison. The question of how far it would carry his protagonist got James to commit to the film. James worked with Marks to strip away the violence and cliches that felt exploitative, until he and Marks wound up with a real study of contrasting characters.

“The funny while we worked on it was how Justin related to the ex-con,” James said. “Ironically, I was the ex-con, and I related to the doctor determined to be pacifist. I felt his principles were his weapons, his strength.”

Only time will tell if James can follow those principles and become a positive force in Hollywood. Millennium waited for him to open Little Birds, which bows August 17 in New York and Los Angeles. James, on parole, has to walk the straight and narrow to be able to promote the film and travel to shoot his future films where he wants to. Things other filmmakers take for granted.
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Re: Beetlejuice 2

Postby TheButcher on Sun May 06, 2012 10:23 pm

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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Mon Jun 18, 2012 5:34 am

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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby so sorry on Mon Jun 18, 2012 9:00 am

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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby The Vicar on Mon Jun 18, 2012 4:24 pm



Raging Bull II?
Are you shitting me?
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'End times is coming!!!
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Jun 19, 2012 9:29 am

Raging Bull II? really?

if this keeps up, before we know it all those Titanic II jokes will someday become a reality.




oh wait...
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Spandau Belly on Tue Jun 19, 2012 11:06 am

Will RAGING BULL 2 feature scenes involving Jake LaMotta as advisor on the biopic Scorcese made about him called RAGING BULL? Can we have one actor playing Jake LaMotta advising another actor playing DeNiro playing LaMotta?
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby so sorry on Tue Jun 19, 2012 12:37 pm

Spandau Belly wrote:Will RAGING BULL 2 feature scenes involving Jake LaMotta as advisor on the biopic Scorcese made about him called RAGING BULL? Can we have one actor playing Jake LaMotta advising another actor playing DeNiro playing LaMotta?



In that briefly described link I think that might actually happen! It sounds like this shit bomb is based on a LaMatta book he wrote about the making of the RB movie and how it affected his life after.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Jun 19, 2012 1:06 pm

so sorry wrote:
Spandau Belly wrote:Will RAGING BULL 2 feature scenes involving Jake LaMotta as advisor on the biopic Scorcese made about him called RAGING BULL? Can we have one actor playing Jake LaMotta advising another actor playing DeNiro playing LaMotta?



In that briefly described link I think that might actually happen! It sounds like this shit bomb is based on a LaMatta book he wrote about the making of the RB movie and how it affected his life after.


i hope this movie is a hit. then i can pitch my idea for Raging Bull 3, a film about a bunch of bloggers and internet fanboys who get outraged when they hear about some guys making a sequel to Raging Bull, and they hunt them down and beat them up. also based on a true story.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Spandau Belly on Tue Jun 19, 2012 1:18 pm

No no no, the obvious next step is a William Forsythe biopic so that we can get another actor to play Forsythe during his time on the set of RAGING BULL 2 playing LaMotta on the set of the first RAGING BULL advising a different actor playing another actor playing DeNiro playing LaMotta.

I'm sure Charlie Kaufman could be enticed to right the script with the right offer.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby minstrel on Tue Jun 19, 2012 1:29 pm

Spandau Belly wrote:No no no, the obvious next step is a William Forsythe biopic so that we can get another actor to play Forsythe during his time on the set of RAGING BULL 2 playing LaMotta on the set of the first RAGING BULL advising a different actor playing another actor playing DeNiro playing LaMotta.

I'm sure Charlie Kaufman could be enticed to right the script with the right offer.


My brain hurts already. Why did you have to bring Kaufman into this?

Maybe they could make this work as a stop-motion animated movie starring an animated bull as LaMotta and barnyard animals as the rest of the cast. Frank Welker could do all the voices. Somebody get Tim Burton on the phone!
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Jun 19, 2012 2:01 pm

minstrel wrote:
Spandau Belly wrote:No no no, the obvious next step is a William Forsythe biopic so that we can get another actor to play Forsythe during his time on the set of RAGING BULL 2 playing LaMotta on the set of the first RAGING BULL advising a different actor playing another actor playing DeNiro playing LaMotta.

I'm sure Charlie Kaufman could be enticed to right the script with the right offer.


My brain hurts already. Why did you have to bring Kaufman into this?

Maybe they could make this work as a stop-motion animated movie starring an animated bull as LaMotta and barnyard animals as the rest of the cast. Frank Welker could do all the voices. Somebody get Tim Burton on the phone!


can we somehow work in andy serkis playing the motion-captured CGI role of martin scorsese's eyebrows?
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Re: Jumanji

Postby TheButcher on Fri Dec 07, 2012 6:04 am

papalazeru wrote:Someone make Jumanji 3 please.

From THR:
Zach Helm to Write 'Jumanji' Remake (Heat Vision Exclusive)
UPDATED: Matt Tolmach and Bill Teitler are producing the reimagining of the story, based on a Chris van Allsburg book and previously adapted into the 1995 Robin Williams movie.
Borys Kit wrote:Zach Helm, who garnered acclaim for penning Stranger Than Fiction, has been tapped to write Columbia’s reimagining of Jumanji.

Matt Tolmach and Bill Teitler are producing the project, which is a new adaptation of the Chris Van Allsburg book. The tome, first published in 1981, was previously a 1995 movie directed by Joe Johnston that starred Robin Wiliams and Kirsten Dunst. Ted Field and Mike Weber are exec producing the new project.

The movie, blending light comedy and family adventure, told of a board game come to life as two kids discover the supernatural game and release a man trapped in there decades earlier. They also unleash jungle forces and must team up with the man to quell the game’s powerful magic.

The 2005 Jon Favreau-directed film Zathura was a sequel of sorts.

Word of a remake came early this summer when Sony execs said they were developing the project as “an update for the present."

Helm has proven to have a whimsical touch with Stranger Than Fiction and his Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium, the latter of which he directed. He recently did rewrite work on The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, another comedic adventure movie that stars Ben Stiller and will be released Dec. 25, 2013.

He is repped by CAA.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 01, 2013 4:20 pm

Paramount Animation Plans ‘Monster Trucks’ Live Action-Toon Franchise: In Final Talks With Blue Sky’s Chris Wedge To Direct
NIKKI FINKE wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
Who hasn’t seen boys big and small intently watching monster trucks do their stuff? I’ve learned that there’s a combination live action/computer animation feature about them which is Adam Goodman‘s priority project for Paramount Animation right now. And he’s kicking off the toon division’s second project by going after one of Blue Sky Studios’ biggest names. Based on an original idea and planned for Summer 2015, Monster Trucks could hopefully become a Transformers-like franchise the way Paramount sees it. So my sources say the studio is in final negotiations with Chris Wedge (Ice Age, Robots, Epic) to direct the planned $100M budget film which should start production in the first half of 2014. Mary Parent is producing, and Jonathan Aibel & Glenn Berger writing. Those scribes also scripted DWA’s Kung Fu Panda and Paramount Animation’s first project, the untitled SpongeBob SquarePants, which Parent also is producing as well as Noah for big Paramount.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 01, 2013 4:24 pm

Fleming Rants On Why Studios Can’t Launch Franchises Anymore, Leaving Us With Retreads Like ‘The Mummy’
MIKE FLEMING JR wrote:Universal has confirmed that Len Wiseman has dropped off Universal’s reboot of The Mummy franchise, which will get a new round of movies after the last reboot trilogy grossed north of $1.25 billion worldwide before running out of steam. Do we need another Mummy? I wouldn’t think so, but apparently we do need to reopen that sarcophagus, especially since studios are whiffing badly in attempts to create new intellectual properties. They instead seem bent on running tried and tested past successes into the ground.

Leaving The Mummy might be the best thing for Wiseman, a props man who got off to an impressive start as a director by launching the ambitious Underworld. He helped hatch that series, which added some real flourishes to the vampires and werewolves genre. Since then, Wiseman has gone through a succession of sequels (Live Free Or Die Hard) and remakes (Total Recall), becoming a symbol of a time where Hollywood studios place too little emphasis on originality and instead prize utterly familiar product studios hope might put up big global numbers. Wiseman needs an original movie, and fast.

Why does Hollywood go back to the well so often on tired retreads? Because, as this summer has proven, it’s damn near impossible to create new intellectual properties that are not based on bestselling book series with vast reading audiences like Twilight Saga or The Hunger Games. Some of this summer’s non-sequel misfires, like After Earth, The Lone Ranger and R.I.P.D., surely deserve to be one-offs. But even worthy, imaginative films like Pacific Rim have it rough. They get measured and dismissed quickly, not helped by the fact that press coverage has become reliant on imprecise tracking service estimates that give journalists a touchstone to dismiss movies even before anyone has seen them. Early low tracking on Pacific Rim fueled advance stories that the movie would be a flop, which it wasn’t. When The Wolverine‘s opening weekend didn’t match high advance tracking estimates, journalists bashed the movie (which is quite good), and not the faulty tracking services that overestimated the opening weekend numbers in the first place. Pacific Rim also wasn’t helped by a marketing campaign straight out of Transformers, and it wasn’t until too late that Warner Bros switched to spots that showed the movie had heart and wasn’t just a collision of robots and over-sized alien monsters from beneath the sea.

If there are two originals this summer worth sequel-izing, I would nominate Pacific Rim and World War Z. Despite being real crowd-pleasers, these will not be easy decisions because their high production budgets require each to do upwards of $400 million worldwide before serious sequel talk even begins. WWZ passed this threshold and is at $475 million, while Pac Rim is at $226 million but playing strong in Asian territories including China. All of this raises the currency of worn franchises like The Mummy.

If you actually look at some of the films that grew into lucrative franchises, many came in with low expectations and were happy accidents rather than pre-programmed franchise launches. The Terminator, for instance, is a big franchise for Paramount, Annapurna and Skydance, after Megan Ellison bought for $20 million or so. I can remember James Cameron telling me that his backer on the original, Hemdale, drew a clear line in the sand and told the director to end the movie at the point where Michael Biehn’s Reese character sticks an explosive in the semi-tanker and dives into the dumpster. Cameron had to beg and borrow for the money to shoot the final scene. Would The Terminator have been memorable without Sarah Connor crushing the cyborg in a hydraulic press in that automated factory? Maybe not. There are a million stories like these. Marvel under Kevin Feige has been the most prolific hit-making success story in Hollywood, but this came only after decades of futility when Marvel was horribly mismanaged, made bad deal after bad deal and wound up in bankruptcy.

The Fast And The Furious was almost entirely out of gas before Universal smartly brought in Chris Morgan and Justin Lin, who tinkered under the hood and and much to the surprise of everybody, restored it into Universal’s most valuable franchise outside of Jurassic Park. They smartly added energy by bringing back Vin Diesel and adding Dwayne Johnson and others. The studio is now looking for another big star to join the next film in a small role and then be a big part of the film that follows. Denzel Washington just turned down that opportunity, but they’ll undoubtedly get somebody important by the time The Conjuring helmer James Wan starts shooting the seventh film. And this summer’s World War Z went in with a blueprint for multiple movies, and shot an ending that lent itself to an easy sequel. Trouble was, nobody liked the final scene where Brad Pitt slays zombies in a giant battle in Russia. In what seems all too rare these days, Paramount spent $20 million to shoot another, far more satisfying climax that made the movie great. But the studio created a challenge for itself to move forward, and I’m not sure where they go with the storyline if they actually make a sequel.

I think that Hollywood is going to have to reconsider its all-or-nothing formula for launching new intellectual properties. These films have to be nurtured, and maybe that’s not possible with all the overspending and the $125 million it takes to launch a studio tentpole film on a global scale. The current batch of summer originals cost too much, and it’s clear that audiences are on to the fact these 3D conversions are just a revenue-raising gimmick on most films. There has to be a way to hatch new franchises without putting so much pressure on them that sequel potential gets snuffed out when they don’t immediately do smashing global business on opening weekend.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 01, 2013 4:30 pm

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Re: “Die Hard in a…”

Postby TheButcher on Thu Aug 01, 2013 4:39 pm

TheButcher wrote:From Deadline:
Roland Emmerich in Talks to Helm $3 Million Sony Spec ‘White House Down’
MIKE FLEMING wrote:EXCLUSIVE:
Roland Emmerich is in talks to next direct White House Down, the James Vanderbilt-scripted action drama. Sony Pictures paid $3 million when Vanderbilt and his Mythology Entertainment partners brought the spec script to market last week. The film focuses on a paramilitary takeover of the White House and was compared to Die Hard when it fetched the highest sum for a spec script so far this year for Vanderbilt, who scripted The Amazing Spider-Man for Sony and is working on the sequel to the Marc Webb-directed 3D film that stars Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone.

Emmerich and his producing partner Harald Kloser will join Mythology Entertainment partners Bradley Fischer, Vanderbilt, and Laeta Kalogridis to produce the film. It will be his next project as director, and production is slated to begin in the fall. Emmerich will follow White House Down with Singularity, which remains a priority project at Columbia Pictures. Kloser is also a producer of Singularity. Vanderbilt’s script work includes Zodiac, he’s adapting Red Riding for Steve Zaillian’s Film Rites and Ridley Scott, and is doing a production rewrite on Robocop. Emmerich is repped by CAA.

20 Ways White House Down Was Not Exactly Like Die Hard
Nick Robins-Early wrote:

White House Down, Roland Emmerich’s latest piece of cinematic destruction, features a good-hearted, gun-toting guy trapped in a building with terrorists, and he alone can take them all down, one by one. This has led some to call it “Die Hard in the White House,” a shorthand that is insultingly reductive. These movies are nothing alike! It’s apples and oranges, Deep Impact and Armageddon, Due Date and Planes, Trains, and Automobiles! Witness the disparate evidence. (Spoilers ahead for those who haven’t seen the film yet.)

1. In Die Hard, Bruce Willis plays John McClane, while in WHD, Channing Tatum plays John Cale. Other than the eight letters they have in common (only four of which are in a row), these are totally different names.

2. While they both wear dark grey khakis and blood-stained white tank tops, the two men showcase entirely different belt buckles: McClane’s is silver while Cale’s is gold.

3. Willis’s off-duty law-enforcement officer, who is caught in the wrong place when things start to go sideways, is from New York. Tatum’s off-duty law-enforcement officer, who is caught in the wrong place when things start to go sideways, is from D.C. These cities are over a three-hour car trip from each other.

4. Yes, both films feature protagonists trying to rescue a loved one entrapped in a hostage situation, but Cale is trying to rescue his daughter, while McClane is trying to rescue his wife.

5. McClane is in the bathroom when a hostage crisis erupts, allowing him to hide. Cale’s daughter is in the bathroom when a hostage crisis erupts, allowing her to hide. One is the men’s room, the other is the ladies’ room. The absence of urinals in the latter make any comparison a non-starter.

6. In Die Hard, McClane loses two shoes. In White House Down, Jamie Foxx’s president only loses one.

7. McClane and Cale are both in contact with a member of law enforcement on the outside who butts heads with their superiors in order to aid the protagonist. But in WHD it’s someone Tatum knew from college (Maggie Gyllenhaal) and is alluded to potentially have had a relationship with; in Die Hard it’s a cop (Reginald VelJohnson) who McClane just met and has no known sexual history with.

8. Bad guys entering the Nakatomi Plaza nonchalantly shoot the front desk security guard with a silenced pistol. Bad guys entering the White House nonchalantly shoot the front desk security guard with a silenced pistol … plus like eight other security guards after that.

9. While both films have scenes where the protagonist hides on top of an elevator while the bad guys are in it and overhears their plan, in WHD the elevator goes down afterwards, while in Die Hard it goes up.

10. Hans Gruber’s smug hacker sits in the basement breaking into an encrypted vault, while WHD’s smug hacker in the basement breaks into the encrypted missile command.

11. In Die Hard the villains initially pose as terrorists but are actually robbers who just want money, while in WHD the villains initially pose as robbers who just want money but are in fact terrorists who just want to blow up Iran.

12. McClane performs amateur surgery by removing glass from his own wound. Cale performs amateur surgery by taking glass out of the President’s wound.

13. Sleazy journalists reveal McClane’s name while he’s hiding in Die Hard. In WHD, sleazy journalists reveal the name of Tatum’s daughter while she’s hiding in the White House.

14. Both Tatum and Willis talk to themselves at certain points in the movie and call themselves “stupid,” but in WHD Tatum also talks to a squirrel, suggesting a more deep-seated mental illness.

15. In Die Hard, the FBI takes over the operation and wants to call in an airstrike to take out the terrorists, despite that it will potentially kill hostages. This is wholly different from WHD where it’s the Speaker of the House–cum–acting President who wants to call in an airstrike to take out the terrorists despite the fact that it will definitely kill hostages.

16. The henchmen in Die Hard are beefed-up white dudes with long blond hair, but in WHD the terrorists are made up of almost entirely beefed up white dudes with short brown hair.

17. While the lead henchmen of both movies’ villains are seemingly dispatched by choking, in Die Hard the bad guy isn’t really dead and poses a problem at the end. In order to avoid such a problem in WHD, Tatum chokes him out and then detonates several grenades to blow up his head.

18. Toward the end of Die Hard, John McClane has only two bullets left, something that majorly raises the stakes. In WHD John Cale announces he only has three bullets left, which raises the stakes — for about five seconds before he immediately finds another gun.

19. In Die Hard, Bruce Willis takes a bad guy’s walkie-talkie after killing him, setting up some witty repartee with Alan Rickman. In WHD, Channing Tatum takes a bad guy’s walkie-talkie after killing him, setting up his barely using it for anything ever.

20. In Die Hard, Hans Gruber cowers in fear and pretends to be a hostage in order to not be shot, despite the fact he’s actually the villain. In WHD, John Cale cowers in fear and pretends to be a hostage in order to not be shot, despite the fact he’s actually the hero.

Other movies that White House Down is not like:
Air Force One
Olympus Has Fallen
Die Hard 2
Die Hard With a Vengeance

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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Fievel on Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:04 pm

This seemed like as good of a thread as any.......

‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ Sequel in the Works
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Mon Nov 18, 2013 5:44 pm

Fievel wrote:This seemed like as good of a thread as any.......

‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ Sequel in the Works


Karolyn Grimes, who played George Bailey’s daughter “Zuzu” in the original, will return for the “Wonderful Life” sequel as an angel who shows Bailey’s unlikeable grandson (also named George Bailey) how much better off the world would have been had he never been born.


so this one will be called It's a Shitty Fucked-Up Life?
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It’s a Wonderful Life 2: Zuzu's Rose Petals

Postby TheButcher on Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:20 am

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Re: It’s a Wonderful Life 2: Zuzu's Rose Petals

Postby so sorry on Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:46 pm




Meh, honestly couldn't care less about this sequel. I know I've watched Wonderful Life once or twice in my lifetime, but it holds no emotional significance to me, so a sequel wouldn't anger me at all. This is one of those movies that just has an American cultural icon status attached to it, but seriously, how many people sit down and watch this every year? Under the age of say 40?
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Re: It’s a Wonderful Life 2: Zuzu's Rose Petals

Postby Fievel on Tue Nov 19, 2013 1:57 pm

so sorry wrote:



Meh, honestly couldn't care less about this sequel. I know I've watched Wonderful Life once or twice in my lifetime, but it holds no emotional significance to me, so a sequel wouldn't anger me at all. This is one of those movies that just has an American cultural icon status attached to it, but seriously, how many people sit down and watch this every year? Under the age of say 40?


Guilty.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Spandau Belly on Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:09 pm

Bret Ratner and Nic Cage did a movie called FAMILY MAN back in the year 2000. It was transparently inspired by IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE (and Dickens's Christmas Carol) and had an almost identical plot to that premise for the proposed sequel. It was pretty whatever.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Fievel on Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:33 pm

Frank Darabont put on Frank Capra's underpants when he directed The Majestic in 2001.

Modern audiences yawned.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:38 pm

i always thought this was the "rest of the story".
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby so sorry on Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:42 pm

TheBaxter wrote:i always thought this was the "rest of the story".



BWAHAHAHAHA!!!!! A classic indeed!
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Tue Nov 19, 2013 6:57 pm

so sorry wrote:
TheBaxter wrote:i always thought this was the "rest of the story".



BWAHAHAHAHA!!!!! A classic indeed!

I love that one!
Why you're not even crippled
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Tue Nov 19, 2013 7:30 pm

TheButcher wrote:
so sorry wrote:
TheBaxter wrote:i always thought this was the "rest of the story".



BWAHAHAHAHA!!!!! A classic indeed!

I love that one!
Why you're not even crippled


NOOOOO the line is "you're not even a cripple!"

subtle difference, but important.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Thu Nov 21, 2013 4:36 am

TheBaxter wrote:
TheButcher wrote:
so sorry wrote:
TheBaxter wrote:i always thought this was the "rest of the story".



BWAHAHAHAHA!!!!! A classic indeed!

I love that one!
Why you're not even crippled


NOOOOO the line is "you're not even a cripple!"

subtle difference, but important.

True.
That is some classic SNL!


Paramount Threatens Legal Action Over 'It's a Wonderful Life' Sequel Plan
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Fievel on Thu Nov 21, 2013 8:28 am

TheButcher wrote:
TheBaxter wrote:
TheButcher wrote:
so sorry wrote:
TheBaxter wrote:i always thought this was the "rest of the story".



BWAHAHAHAHA!!!!! A classic indeed!

I love that one!
Why you're not even crippled


NOOOOO the line is "you're not even a cripple!"

subtle difference, but important.

True.
That is some classic SNL!


With the cast of characters represented in that skit, and Dennis Miller even having a rare (his only?) acting role, that skit has come to define that era of SNL for me.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:25 am

Lifeforce to be remade as TV series


unless this is airing on Skinemax and starring Eva Green, i see no way this could possibly do justice to the original.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Mon Nov 25, 2013 6:03 pm

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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Spandau Belly on Tue Nov 26, 2013 8:15 am

A remake of ROADHOUSE would probably be a decent paycheck gig for Craig Brewer. If he signs on to helm, I might actually check it out.

And yeah, you know they're already offering the Swayze role to Tatum.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby so sorry on Tue Nov 26, 2013 11:01 am

Spandau Belly wrote:And yeah, you know they're already offering the Swayze role to Tatum.


100% agree on this.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Fievel on Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:01 pm

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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby so sorry on Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:20 pm



I bet they can get the real O.J. back at a cheap price!
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Al Shut on Fri Dec 13, 2013 2:15 pm

The youtube clip is called ' The Naked Gun Trilogy - Funniest Moments' but is only eight minutes instead of 3 hours?

I call bullshit on that.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby minstrel on Fri Dec 13, 2013 6:03 pm

Damn. I like Ed Helms, but I also like Leslie Nielsen. This could be truly awful, but I hope it isn't. I still haven't gone near the Steve Martin Pink Panther movie because I don't want it to sour me on Peter Sellers.

Argh.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Spandau Belly on Sat Dec 14, 2013 12:28 pm

I think if it were Denzel Washington or Jon Hamm in a NAKED GUN movie, I might at least be interested. Hearing that it's the dentist from THE HANGOVER just gives me flashbacks to that shitty Steve Carrell GET SMART movie.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby Fievel on Sat Dec 14, 2013 1:20 pm

Spandau Belly wrote:I think if it were Denzel Washington or Jon Hamm in a NAKED GUN movie, I might at least be interested.


Let me get this out first - this should NOT be remade. But having said that, I absolutely agree with the notion of Hamm being cast. Casting a constantly-cast buffoon as another buffoon is hardly inspired casting and goes completely against what made Nielsen's casting as Drebben work in the first place.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby caruso_stalker217 on Sun Dec 15, 2013 3:44 pm

I'm not offended by this latest development, but it seems pretty pointless. I won't see it when it comes out and I give it 2-3 weeks before I forget it exists at all.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheBaxter on Sun Dec 15, 2013 8:57 pm

Spandau Belly wrote:I think if it were Denzel Washington or Jon Hamm in a NAKED GUN movie, I might at least be interested. Hearing that it's the dentist from THE HANGOVER just gives me flashbacks to that shitty Steve Carrell GET SMART movie.


its nice to know from the start that this movie will suck so i wont have to pay attention to it.
you know who could actually do justice to leslie nielsen though? stephen colbert.
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'Santa Claus: The Movie'

Postby TheButcher on Thu Dec 26, 2013 6:17 am

When 'Superman: The Movie' Became 'Santa Claus: The Movie'
Scott Mendelson wrote:This December 15th was the 35th anniversary of the theatrical release of Richard Donner’s Superman: The Movie. The groundbreaking superhero adventure was of course a massive box office smash, earning $300 million worldwide way back in 1978, making it one of the ten-biggest global success of all time at that moment. Despite a tumultuous production that involved shooting two films at the same time, a record-high budget of around $55 million for the first film, and enough backstage intrigue to fill a very long book, the Warner Bros. picture earned rave reviews, a special Oscar for its groundbreaking special effects (yes, we did believe a man could fly), and a place in the history books as the template for pretty much every superhero origin story that would follow in its footsteps. Yes, watching Superman: The Movie makes you realize just how perfectly Richard Donner and Tom Mankiewicz distilled the iconic three-act origin story structure (initial trauma and/or discovery of powers, experimentation with powers and public appearances, discovery and showdown with the arch villain) for that kind of heroic journey, paving the way for Spider-Man, Batman, Captain America, and Santa Claus.


Why does every story have to be an Earth-shattering epic?
Genevieve Valentine wrote:Lately, it seems like every story has to be massive, or nobody cares. Every Doctor Who story is about saving the entire universe. The latest Hobbit movie seemed to be trying to be a Lord of the Rings-style saga. Every action movie needs global stakes. Can we talk about our epic epidemic?


The Reason Why So Many Movies Seem So Similar
Ria Misra wrote:Commenter SteveTheCreep shared these thoughts on how the process impacts his own screenwriting:

I can tell you why: development executives. 2013 was the year my screenwriting career finally started to take off, which meant constant meetings with development executives, and they all seemed to have the same notes.

1) the main character has to be the only person who could possibly be the hero of this script. They have an epic destiny or a very specific set of skills that make them perfect. Gone are the days when a protagonist could be an anybody who happened to be in the right place at the wrong time.

2) the stakes have to be raised. No matter how high the stakes are now, they need to be higher. This can't be about one small town, it has to have the possibility to leak into the whole world. It can't be about one man or woman saving their child. In the process, they also have to stop the villains from taking over the government. Any successful film that didn't meet these two points is considered an "fluke."

It's like they all got a checklist of what to ask when it comes to story pitches. I'm probably like most other screenwriters, in that I now develop my pitches so they hit these bullet points.


The Epic-ification of the Hollywood Blockbuster
Corey Atad wrote:There was once a time when the physical barriers to world-creation on-screen dictated a level of narrative justification for an epic scope. Were we to pinpoint the new age of “epic-ification,” we might place it somewhere in the post-Lord of the Rings/Star Wars prequels area. It was then, after the audience’s expectations for visual effects was permanently altered, that Hollywood started to lose its grip on the relationship between narrative necessity and epic scope. Now that anything could be put on the screen, everything should, and in as massive a scale as possible.

The trend toward epic-ification is something I had felt for a while, but which I first noticed consciously when I sat through Sam Raimi’s mildly amusing but mostly awful Oz the Great and Powerful. Obviously it’s unfair to compare any new take on L. Frank Baum’s stories to the classic MGM film, The Wizard of Oz, even when the new film plays as more-or-less a direct prequel. That film was a kind of lightning-in-a-bottle that just doesn’t strike twice. It’s a cultural landmark, and deservedly so. But it wasn’t the lesser quality of Raimi’s film that bothered me most. No, what kept gnawing at me was the totally unnecessary attempt to take the world of Oz and make it “epic.”

The Wizard of Oz was limited by the technology available at the time. Though it features some incredible visual effects, they are modest in their scope. Everything is very clearly shot on soundstages, and the world of Oz is often seen in obviously painted backdrops. This gives the film a quaint charm, but it also fits in perfectly with the scope of the narrative. It isn’t an epic film. It’s about characters on a quest, but the stakes are as simple as going to see a wizard so he can send Dorothy back to Kansas. The emotional importance of the quest is there, to be sure, but nothing about the story requires a larger scale rendering than the one it’s given.

Compare that to Oz the Great and Powerful, which strains under the weight of an unjustifiably epic scope. Though the journey of the main character, Oz, is arguably deeper and weightier than the one Dorothy went through, the film goes much too far in widening its vision of the world it creates. It seems to attempt a sort of mythic rendering of the world of Oz. Apparently it wasn’t enough to tell a nice redemption story in the form of a charmingly simple quest. Heaven forbid the film stick to an airy tone (in one of the more rage-inducing moments, the singing munchkins are essentially mocked and then told to stop by Oz himself).

In a decision I suspect was influenced largely by Disney executives and the film’s producers, Raimi and his writers attempt an epic-ification of the material at hand. Oz needs to organize the people for a battle. There need to be big explosions, vastly rendered flyover shots to establish every location, expansive vistas, huge, ungainly rock formations. The result is a film that feels too big for its story, as well as too serious to be charming, and too ironic in its comedy style. The comedy factor is particularly disheartening. Everything is so big that the only way to inject comedy is to have character ironically undercut nearly every genuine moment with a not-so-witty jab.

The sequence in the film most emblematic of this epic-ification approach is the introduction into the world of Oz. In The Wizard of Oz we famously see Dorothy stepping out of her house black-and-white and into the candy-colored Munchkin Land. It’s a spectacle of sorts, and it’s effective even today. That simple transition from black-and-white to bright Technicolor was enough. How is the corresponding transition done in Oz the Great and Powerful? Oz comes out of the tornado, flying in his balloon. The black-and-white, 1.33:1 image begins to saturate with color and the aspect ratio slides into the wider 2.39:1. That in itself is quite simple and tasteful, but the color image and wider frame is then used to show a huge, CGI landscape, and it’s accompanied by loud, dark music. It’s as though the filmmakers felt the need to say, “this ain’t your grandmother’s Oz; this is epic!”

It’s not just Oz the Great and Powerful, though, that suffers from epic-ification. My feelings about this trend were equally informed by a recent re-watch of Gore Verbinski’s Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy. Nobody would really claim that the original film, The Curse of the Black Pearl is a small film. In many ways it is epic: spanning a wide geography; glorious shots of the open seas; featuring sword fights and ship battles. It’s a big film rendered on a big canvas, but when you actually sit down to consider it, the film is at its heart a fun swashbuckling adventure and nothing more.

The biggest scale sequence in the film is a ship battle, but it’s done in a pretty standard way for a swashbuckler of its ilk. Cannons are fired, swords clash and people swing around on ropes. The other big action sequences are essentially just well staged sword fights in pretty small locations. One near the start of the film is fun almost entirely for the rapport between the two characters. The big scene at the end features a few more characters and the added CGI-aided spectacle of characters transforming between flesh-and-blood and skeleton.

The sequels, Dead Man’s Chest and At World’s End, both suffer a multitude of problems, but perhaps the biggest is that somewhere along the lines it was decided that being fun swashbucklers wasn’t enough: the series needed to go epic! Huge sea monsters! Outrageously set action set pieces! Goddesses! A battle for the very fate of piratedom! The big sword fight in Dead Man’s Chest isn’t just a well-written, well-choreographed bit of fun. Oh no. It’s three characters fighting on top of a huge water wheel rolling through the jungle. The final ship battle in At World’s End? It’s not enough that the stakes are stupidly high. Heavens, that wouldn’t do at all. Take those two ships and have them firing at each other while spinning around a huge maelström. It’s all too much. It’s too epic, and it never feels justified for the series.

There are many other examples of this. I get the physical scale, but why are the Transformers films all 150-minute-plus epics? Why did Disney need to make Alice in Wonderland, ostensibly the forbearer to Oz the Great and Powerful, a dark, Lord of the Rings-inspired epic with huge battles? The same could be said for Snow White and the Huntsman, or The Hobbit, or Twilight: Breaking Dawn, or Prometheus or the upcoming The Lone Ranger. There’s even and animated film coming soon titled Epic!

Finding the impetus behind epic-ification is tricky. As long as there have been movies there have been attempts to make the “biggest” movie possible. This goes all the way back to the silent era with films like the original Ben-Hur, The Ten Commandments and Intolerance. The sense I get these days, though, is that “epic” has become synonymous both with “coolness” and with a certain kind of seriousness, if not of tone, then of approach. It’s no longer enough for a movie to have some spectacle and maybe a good action sequence. A fight between two people isn’t cool. You know what’s cool? A battle with thousands of CGI creatures. These films need to compete for audience attention by proving they can go big enough in scope to make the journey to the theatre worth it.

The problem, as I see it, is a bit of a chicken-and-egg scenario. Is it a matter of studios going overboard in trying to make everything big and epic because they think that’s what audiences want, or is it audiences that want it and thus cause the studios to make films this way? It’s difficult to say. It’s clear that CGI is not helping in this regard. It used to be that if you wanted to film a battle scene featuring a thousand extras you’d need to justify the epic task with a truly epic story like Ben-Hur­ or ­Lawrence of Arabia. If you wanted to create the practical effects to realistically portray cities being destroyed, it would have to be justified by the likes of Independence Day. Now it’s all too easy. Even with sequels, the “bigger is better” mentality has gotten ridiculously out of hand just because modern effects allow for anything. Take a look at the over-the-top stupidity of Live Free or Die Hard and A Good Day to Die Hard compared to the original Die Hard. No amount of surfing on fighter jet wings will ever be as satisfying as the narrative build-up and payoff in the rooftop explosion sequence in that first John McClane film.

We still get films like The Dark Knight, Avatar, Inception, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, Harry Potter 7 and The Avengers, all of which are justified in their scale, both on narrative terms and the need to use size as spectacle. Then you have all those other films. The films that feel the only way they can compete with those truly epic blockbusters is to become epic themselves, even when they strain to carry the weight. Already Disney is hard at work on epic-ifying other fairy tales, including the story of Sleeping Beauty. No doubt it’ll be heavy in tone and replete with soaring helicopter shots of vast, foreboding, computer animated landscapes, you know, to sell that epic scope. It makes sense of course, because today, in the age of the epic-ification of the Hollywood blockbuster, if it isn’t absurdly scaled, why bother?


Iron Man 3 named 2013's highest-grossing movie
Last edited by TheButcher on Sat Mar 01, 2014 5:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Hollywood has OFFICIALLY run out of ideas

Postby TheButcher on Wed Jan 08, 2014 4:34 pm

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